hide Sorting

You can sort these results in two ways:

By entity
Chronological order for dates, alphabetical order for places and people.
By position (current method)
As the entities appear in the document.

You are currently sorting in ascending order. Sort in descending order.

hide Most Frequent Entities

The entities that appear most frequently in this document are shown below.

Entity Max. Freq Min. Freq
Fitzhugh Lee 369 33 Browse Search
Stonewall Jackson 359 1 Browse Search
Frederick Grant 268 0 Browse Search
United States (United States) 246 0 Browse Search
Braxton Bragg 242 8 Browse Search
Robert E. Lee 224 0 Browse Search
Jubal A. Early 221 5 Browse Search
Robert Lee 215 1 Browse Search
Robert Edward Lee 193 35 Browse Search
Sheridan 180 2 Browse Search
View all entities in this document...

Browsing named entities in Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 11. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones).

Found 18,088 total hits in 5,758 results.

1 2 3 4 5 6 7 ...
Pinckney. So charmed was Mr. DeRenne with A Bachelor's Reverie, in three parts. I. Smoke, signifying Doubt; II. Blaze, signifying Cheer; III. Ashes, signfying Desolation: by Ik. Marvel, that in 1850, by permission of and as a compliment to the gentle author, he had a beautiful edition of twelve copies privately printed. In 1851 Mr. DeRenne published, as his fourth Wormsloe Quarto, the Diary of Colonel Winthrop Sargent, Adjutant-General of the United States Army during the Campaign of 1791. Only such portion of the diary was printed as related to St. Clair's expedition. Of these Quartos but a very limited edition was printed, and the copies were donated to famous libraries and placed in the hands of favored friends. Of the first quarto, there are only twenty-one copies of the second, forty-nine; of the third, nineteen, and of the fourth, forty-six. They are all admirable specimens of typography and literary taste; and, in addition to the historical value they possess, are
the sons of the Missouri, in a perfectly white hunting shirt of deer skin, and leggins and moccasins of the same, with an elegant head-dress of feathers. He held a white flag in his right hand and a beautifully ornamented pipe in the other. He said: I have offended. I sacrifice myself to save my country. In 1828, Lieutenant Johnston was selected as Adjutant of his regiment by Brigadier General Henry Atkinson. The Colonel commanding, Colonel T. L. Alexander, who joined the regiment in 1830 says of him at this time: Possessing in an extraordinary degree the confidence, esteem and admiration of the whole regiment, he was the very beau ideal of a soldier and an officer. Peace prevailed until the breaking out of the Black Hawk war in 1832. In this war the Sixth regiment took an active part, and the careful memoranda or journal, kept daily by Lieutenant Johnston, forms the data mainly from which the history of this Indian war has been written After a series of skirmishes and enga
d dawn has begun. [After concluding his paper Dr. Burrows stated that a clipping from a newspaper had been sent to him after he had prepared his paper, giving an incident of considerable interest, which he desired to read to the meeting, and on being informed by the President that the meeting would be pleased to hear it, he read the following extract from a letter written by M. Quad in the Detroit Free Press of a recent date]: One of the occupants of the Castle, in the winter of 1864-5, was a Federal named James Hancock, claiming to be a scout attached to Grant's army. He was captured under circumstances which seemed to prove him a spy, and while waiting for his case to be investigated he was sent to Castle Thunder. Hancock was a jolly, rollicking fellow, having wonderful facial expression and great powers of mimicry. One evening, while singing a song for the amusement of his fellow-prisoners, he suddenly stopped, threw up his hands, staggered, and fell like a bag of sand
ed Artillery. The vessel was by the Confederates called Virginia. She was put in commission during the last week of February, but continued crowded with mechanics until the eve of the fight. She was badly ventilated, very uncomfortable, and ver gave equal evidence that the divine spark in their natures was indeed a living fire. Editorial Paragraphs. our February and March numbers are combined under one cover for the convenience of the Secretary, who expects to be absent from his oeed in their efforts. General Fitzhugh Lee (accompanied by the Secretary) expects to start on the 19th of this month (February) on his second lecturing tour in behalf of the Southern Historical Society. The programme of lectures as now arrangedecked effectually the cavalry expeditions sent out by Sheridan. Matters were now rapidly hastening to an end. Late in February Sheridan set out from Winchester with 10,000 sabres, and moved up the Valley. Early attempted, with the 1,200 or 1,300
which was declined. In December, his health having sufficiently improved, he returned to Texas. In 1838 Mirabeau B. Lamar was elected President, and David G. Burnet Vice President, and on the 22d of December, after their installation, General Johnston was appointed Secretary of War, a position which he filed with distinguished ability until 1840, when he resigned. After his resignation he repaired to his plantation in Brazoria county, Texas, and was made happy by the admission of Texas, in 1845, to a place as one of the independent and sovereign States of the American Union. On the admission of Texas into the Union, General Z. Taylor was ordered to the Rio Grande to protect our western frontier from the threatened invasion of the Mexicans. The Mexicans began the contest by an attack on Fort Brown, where Major Brown was killed. But the fort held out until succor came. On May 8th the forces under General Taylor, returning from Point Isabel, encountered the Mexicans, led by Gener
thout undue egotism, be permitted briefly to refer to our antecedent history. The Washington Artillery is distinguished by being the oldest military organization in Louisiana, and the oldest perhaps in any of the Southern States. In the year 1840, the Washington Regiment, commanded by Colonel Persifer F. Smith, was the only military organization of note above Canal street. It was composed of cavalry, artillery and infantry, partaking of the character of a legion. The Washington Artillery, In 1838 Mirabeau B. Lamar was elected President, and David G. Burnet Vice President, and on the 22d of December, after their installation, General Johnston was appointed Secretary of War, a position which he filed with distinguished ability until 1840, when he resigned. After his resignation he repaired to his plantation in Brazoria county, Texas, and was made happy by the admission of Texas, in 1845, to a place as one of the independent and sovereign States of the American Union. On the ad
two. The third was Mr. Calhoun. No time-serving or self-seeking entered into their calculations. Self-abnegation, at the bidding of duty, was the rule of their lives. Could our much-maligned section lay no further claim to the consideration of mankind, the fact that it produced, almost in the same generation, such a triumvirate, typical of their people, is enough to place it among the foremost nations of the earth in the realm of thought, patriotism and knightly grace. By the treaty of 1848 the Territory of Utah was ceded to the United States. Some of the Federal judges sent to the Territory were murdered, and others were driven from the Territory. General Johnston was put in command of the troops sent to restore order in the Territory. He arrived at Fort Leavenworth on the 11th of September, and by the 17th of the same month was on the road to Salt Lake City, his command acting as an escort to the civil officers sent to said Territory. His march was through ice and snow; the
in my possession. During, the winter of 1861-62, Colonel George H. Steuart, commanding the Firsthe Second regiment was organized in the fall of 1862, and during the winter elected Lieutenant-Coloncted into one command were as manifest to me in 1862-64 as they are now. They had no relation to thed. Their manufacture was discontinued early in 1862, and a new projectile, having a saucer-shaped c the three-inch rifled guns during the whole of 1862, and these projectiles were used also in the bebattalions were well organized in the winter of 1862 that anything was done to simplify this matter. that such an one as I should, in the spring of 1862, be invited by him to that post. Verily, had nefeat of Milroy at McDowell in the early May of 1862, that of Banks at Winchester; the concentrationTake another: He writes to his wife, Christmas, 1862, in answer to the inquiry whether he could not ernstown, where Shields had repulsed Jackson in 1862. Early's victory was thorough, Crook's forces
al index to first ten volumes of Southern Histori-Cal Society Papers, which we published in our December number, cost us a good deal of labor, and considerable extra expense for the printing; but we aic importance, to which we shall hereafter give attention. The Bivouac, Louisville, Ky., for December, is an interesting and valuable number, and we again commend it as worthy of a wide circulationy on the 27th of November, to go into quarters for the winter, and during all the early part of December the men were engaged in building houses for themselves and stables for the horses. The officerth Company were not idle and were heard meanwhile at Mumfordsville and at Perryville, Ky. In December, at Fredericksburg, Va., the battalions held the post of honor on Marye's Hill against repeated7th of June he wrote to the Secretary of War tendering his resignation, which was declined. In December, his health having sufficiently improved, he returned to Texas. In 1838 Mirabeau B. Lamar was
o brigades, to be known as the Maryland Line. III. Colonel George H. Steuart, now commanding the First Maryland regiment, is assigned to this duty of organization, re-enlisting for his own regiment, and re-organizing from the material obtained by enlistments and transfers, in accordance with the foregoing law—having command of the whole. By order of the Secretary of War, S. Cooper, Adjutant & Inspector General. Colonel Steuart was promoted to be Brigadier-General in the following March, and on reporting to Major-General Ewell, of Jackson's army in the Valley, was allotted the First Maryland regiment, Brown's troop of cavalry, and the Baltimore Light Artillery, which thus constituted the Maryland Line. During the Campaign of the Valley, however, in the advance he commanded a brigade of cavalry, and it was not until after the battle of Winchester (May 26) that he assumed command of the Line, which was attached to the second brigade Jackson's division, also under Steuart's
1 2 3 4 5 6 7 ...