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Browsing named entities in a specific section of Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 17. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones). Search the whole document.

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Russia (Russia) (search for this): chapter 1.12
be owned, was accomplished, whatever and however great the wrongs to be avenged may have been. It did restore the cotton States to the Union, but it restored only the land and the wretched inhabitants of it. Instead of maintaining the honor, the integrity, and the existence of our national Union, it destroyed that Union, in all but a territorial sense, more effectually than secession, by substituting conquered provinces for free States, and repeating in America the shameful history of Russia and Poland. Instead of maintaining the perpetuity of popular government, it established a military government; instead of enforcing the laws of the Union, it established over nearly half the Union military and martial law. In fact, arbitrary power and force have proved themselves failures as agencies in establishing or maintaining the true principles of American government. The actual re-establishment of the Union, with all the blessings we enjoy under it, has come through a reacti
Arkansas (Arkansas, United States) (search for this): chapter 1.12
, about the causes of secession, the discussion occurring, curiously enough, after the act of secession had been consummated. If we now turn to the border slave States we shall find a marked difference of opinion and feeling. The people of Arkansas voted on the 16th of January, 1861, on the proposition to call a convention to decide upon the subject of secession. It was determined to hold a convention by a vote of 27,412 for and 15,826 against the measure, out of a voting population of 54Supreme Court of the United States, and the others were so vague that the border States themselves might be embraced within their scope. Their resolution was quickly taken upon the question thus suddenly forced upon them. The convention of Arkansas, which on the 18th of March had refused to adopt an ordinance of secession by a vote of 35 to 39, assembled again on the 6th of May and passed that ordinance by a vote of 69 to 1. In North Carolina, which had refused in February to call a con
Louisiana (Louisiana, United States) (search for this): chapter 1.12
ession. Soon after it became known that Mr. Lincoln had been elected, the cotton States, consisting of South Carolina, Georgia, Florida, Alabama, Mississippi, Louisiana, and Texas, took measures to secede from the Union, treating his election as a sufficient cause for their action. South Carolina led the way on the 17th of Debmitted to the people. In Mississippi the ordinance was adopted on the 9th of January, 1861, by a vote of 84 to 15, and was not submitted to the people. In Louisiana the ordinance was adopted in convention on the 25th of January, 1861 by a vote of 113 to 17, the convention refusing to submit it to the people by a vote of 84 ts have been for some time past and now are opposed and the execution thereof obstructed in the States of South Carolina, Georgia, Alabama, Florida, Mississippi, Louisiana, and Texas by combinations too powerful to be suppressed by the ordinary course of judicial proceedings, or by the powers vested in the marshals by law: No
Mexico (Mexico, Mexico) (search for this): chapter 1.12
demy at West Point. He was not educated by the Federal Government, but by Virginia; for she paid her full share for the support of that institution, and was entitled to demand in return the services of her sons. Entering the army of the United States, he represented Virginia there also, and nobly performed his duty for the Union, of which Virginia was a member, whether we look to his peaceful services as an engineer, or to his more notable deeds upon foreign fields of battle. He came from Mexico crowned with honors, covered by brevets, and recognized, young as he was, as one of the ablest of his country's soldiers. When Virginia joined the Confederacy, and the seat of government was moved to Richmond, Lee was the highest officer in the little army of Virginia, and promptly co-operated in all the movements of the Confederate Government for the defense of the common country; and when he was sent to West Virginia made no inquiry as to his rank, but continued to serve under the impre
Libby Hill (Vermont, United States) (search for this): chapter 1.12
olding a wreath of laurel over the head of a Confederate soldier who is seated at her feet. The standing figure was intended for an impersonation of the South. These suggestions Mons. Mercie soon elaborated into a beautiful group. Let us hope that for the want of a few thousand dollars, this noble monument of General Lee will not be left in an unfinished state, as it must be while it lacks the two groups of sculpture which formed a part of the original design. Discussing the site. Libby Hill, Gamble's Hill, and the Allen lot, in the western part of the city, were successively discussed and voted on as the site of the statue. The Allen lot was at last chosen and accepted as the gift of Mr. Otway S. Allen, by the following resolution: June 18th, 1887. Resolved, That in view of the original advantages of the location, the donation of Mr. Otway S. Allen, heirs and devisees, of the circle of 100 feet, radius as the monument site, and especially in consideration of the surrou
Pennsylvania (Pennsylvania, United States) (search for this): chapter 1.12
ory rather than retreat. You did not know it, for I would not have known had he not reported it, with the request, however, that it should not be made public. The clamor which then arose followed him when he went to South Carolina, so that it became necessary to write a letter to the Governor of that State telling him what manner of man he was. Mr. Davis then spoke of the straits to which the Confederacy was reduced, and reviewed her sad and glorious history through the advance into Pennsylvania, the battle of Gettysburg, the final surrender. He then proceeded: Here he now sleeps in the land he loved, and that land is not Virginia only, for they do injustice to Lee who believe he fought only for Virginia. He was ready to go anywhere, on any service for the good of his country, and his heart was as broad as the fifteen States struggling for the principles that our forefathers fought for in the Revolution of 1776. This day we unite our words of sorrow with those of the g
Richmond (Virginia, United States) (search for this): chapter 1.12
of the Hollywood Memorial Association was also invited. Hollywood associations appeal. The following is a copy of the circular by which this collection was made: The undersigned, connected with the Hollywood Memorial Association of Richmond, Va., respectfully request the friends and admirers of General Robert E. Lee, in our whole country and abroad, to unite with them in a contribution for an equestrian bronze statue of our chieftain, of the best workmanship, to be erected in the solourth Sunday (27th) has been appointed as the day on which the collection for the monument will be taken up. Please advertise as far as you can. Remit contributions to Miss S. N. Randolph, secretary of Ladies' Lee Monument Committee, Box 838, Richmond, Va. Work of both organizations. Both associations soon adopted the most practical and efficient way of raising funds, which was to send, on the part of each, an efficient and accredited agent to travel through the South and canvass the dif
Poland (Poland) (search for this): chapter 1.12
was accomplished, whatever and however great the wrongs to be avenged may have been. It did restore the cotton States to the Union, but it restored only the land and the wretched inhabitants of it. Instead of maintaining the honor, the integrity, and the existence of our national Union, it destroyed that Union, in all but a territorial sense, more effectually than secession, by substituting conquered provinces for free States, and repeating in America the shameful history of Russia and Poland. Instead of maintaining the perpetuity of popular government, it established a military government; instead of enforcing the laws of the Union, it established over nearly half the Union military and martial law. In fact, arbitrary power and force have proved themselves failures as agencies in establishing or maintaining the true principles of American government. The actual re-establishment of the Union, with all the blessings we enjoy under it, has come through a reaction against
Hunt (Ohio, United States) (search for this): chapter 1.12
er walked up to him and told him a rebel had stolen his hat. In the midst of his orders he stopped and told the rebel to give him back the hat, and saw that he done it, too. I wondered at him taking any notice of a prisoner in the midst of battle. It showed what a heart he had for them. I did not want his life to appear without notice of it, for I cannot forget it. These are the facts of the case. You may put them in what shape you wish. Yours respectfully, John E. Davis. Hunt's Station, Knox county, O. I think this story worthy of a place beside that of Sir Philip Sidney and the wounded soldier. Sir Philip showed mercy, but here is the blessed union of mercy and justice on the battle-field. There is hardly an incident in General Lee's life, great or small, when he was called upon to deal with the rights and the interests and the feelings of others, or to deal with matters affecting the public that does not present an illustration of some virtue. Dignity and grandeur
Toulouse (France) (search for this): chapter 1.12
ught of it as winning a prize. It was marked Glory to the Hero. It represented a triumphant warrior careering over the battle-field waving a sword and shouting to his followers. too often during the progress of his work to need repetition. It is much to be regretted that the artist cannot be present to witness the enthusiasm with which his statue is received. He is described as a short, thick-set, squarely built man, with dark hair and eyes, and a short black beard. He is a native of Toulouse, and holding the eminence which he does in art, he is much sought in Parisian society; he has a handsome establishment, whose windows look out on the charming gardens of the Avenue de L'Observatoire, and in the rear of his house is his studio. One of the orders he received during the past year is for a tomb to be erected in Constantinople. Mons. Mercie is a painter as well as a sculptor. He is a rapid worker; and as an illustration of his merit, it may be mentioned that he generally has
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