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Browsing named entities in a specific section of Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 29. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones). Search the whole document.

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New York State (New York, United States) (search for this): chapter 1.7
He finally proved, and many of the so-called witnesses confessed, the whole matter to be a conspiracy for the purpose of deceiving General Holt and obtaining money from the government. The investigation proved, and the report states, that— Sanford Conover—his true name is Dunham; lawyer by profession, formerly lived at Croton, then in New York and Brooklyn; a very shrewd, bad, and dangerous man. William Campbell—his true name is Joseph A. Hoare, a gas-fixer by trade; born in the State of New York, and never south of Washington. Joseph Snevel—his true name is William H. Roberts, formerly ticket agent on Harlem railroad; then kept tavern at Yonkers, &c.; was never South. Farnum B. Wright—true name, John Waters; is lame in the knee; works in a brick-yard near Cold Spring, on Long Island, &c. John H. Patten—true name, Peter Stevens; lives at Nyack, near Piermont, on the North river; is now a justice of the peace there. Sarah Douglass and Miss Knapp—the true name of one i
Delaware (Delaware, United States) (search for this): chapter 1.7
e said, had, on the 22nd day of May, 1866, passed an act providing that the Circuit Court of the United States should be held at Richmond on the first Monday in May and the fourth Monday in November in each year. This, the Attorney-General held, abrogated the special term fixed for October. But on the 23d of July Congress passed an act to fix the number of judges of the Supreme Court and to change certain judicial circuits. Among those changed was that assigned to the Chief Justice, when Delaware was taken out and South Carolina substituted. This change, it was thought, would make a new allotment necessary, and as this could only be made by the Supreme Court, and not by it until it met, it was probable that the court in Richmond could not convene even in November; during all of which time and through all these contingencies Mr. Davis was to remain in a military jail. Thus it appears that, despite the expressions of a desire to see justice done the prisoner, made by the only men
Centreville (Ohio, United States) (search for this): chapter 1.7
an, Mr. and Mrs. C. C. Clay, Major-General Joseph Wheeler and staff, Colonels Johnston and Lubbock, and Mr. Burton N. Harrison, besides one or two subaltern officers. The safeguards were at once augmented by placing a gunboat on each side of the Clyde. Stephens and Reagan were sent to Fort Warren; Wheeler and staff, Johnston and Lubbock, to Fort Delaware, and Harrison to Washington, while the women and children were sent back South. Fearing that Halleck might not be harsh enough or Miles sebellion, p. 563), and as it is both accurate and authentic, it may be instructive to quote a few sentences: At precisely 1 o'clock General Miles left with a tug and a guard from the garrison to go for Davis and Clay. At 1:30 the tug left the Clyde for the fort. She landed at the engineer wharf, and the procession, led by the cavalrymen of Colonel Pritchard's command, moved through the water battery on the east front of the fortress and entered by a postern leading from that battery. The
Piermont (New York, United States) (search for this): chapter 1.7
rewd, bad, and dangerous man. William Campbell—his true name is Joseph A. Hoare, a gas-fixer by trade; born in the State of New York, and never south of Washington. Joseph Snevel—his true name is William H. Roberts, formerly ticket agent on Harlem railroad; then kept tavern at Yonkers, &c.; was never South. Farnum B. Wright—true name, John Waters; is lame in the knee; works in a brick-yard near Cold Spring, on Long Island, &c. John H. Patten—true name, Peter Stevens; lives at Nyack, near Piermont, on the North river; is now a justice of the peace there. Sarah Douglass and Miss Knapp—the true name of one is Dunham, who is the wife of Conover, the name of the other is Mrs. Charles Smythe; she is the sister or sister-in-law of Conover, and lives at Cold Spring, Long Island; her husband is a clerk on Blackwell's Island. McGill—his name is Neally; he is a licensed pedler in New York, and sometimes drives a one-horse cart. After so ably completing his work, Colonel Turner close
Georgia (Georgia, United States) (search for this): chapter 1.7
n's clothes, or that his wife acted in any way unladylike and undignified on the occasion. Mr. T. H. Peabody, a lawyer of St. Louis, and one of the captors, in a speech made before a Grand Army Post, a few days after Mr. Davis' death, also denied the whole story. The Secretary of War, however, rolled the statement under his tongue as a sweet morsel, and, on the 14th of May, wrote gleefully to the Rev. R. J. Breckinridge, of Kentucky, that Jefferson Davis was caught three days ago in Georgia trying to escape in his wife's clothes.(121 War of Rebellion, p. 555.) On the 23d of May, Mr. C. A. Dana, Assistant Secretary of War, ordered General Miles to direct Colonel Pritchard to bring with him the woman's dress in which Jefferson Davis was captured. (Id., p. 569.) After his capture, Mr. Davis was sent to Savannah. Thence he was carried to Fortress Monroe in the steamer Clyde, under a heavy guard, commanded by Colonel Pritchard. The steamer was convoyed by the United States st
Augusta (Georgia, United States) (search for this): chapter 1.7
h which to manipulate his rude diet. When, on the 13th of September, 1865, Mrs. Davis asked General Miles by telegraph what was the condition of her husband, who had been very sick, the telegram was submitted to the War Department for action; that department replied, instructing the Major-General to send the following telegram, which it was thought, after a few days' consideration, might be sent without detriment to the public welfare: Fort Monroe, Sept. 14, 1865. Mrs. Varina Davis, Augusta, Ga.: Mr. Davis suffered temporarily from a carbuncle on the leg and from erysipelas in the face; that is now over, and he is as well as usual. N. A. Miles, Major-General Commanding. On reading this reply, framed in and transmitted from Washington, one is at a loss to understand the functions of a Major-General commanding, if discretion was not given him to inform an anxious wife five hundred miles away of the condition of her husband's health. (See War of the Rebellion, 747.) Abo
Nyack (New York, United States) (search for this): chapter 1.7
yn; a very shrewd, bad, and dangerous man. William Campbell—his true name is Joseph A. Hoare, a gas-fixer by trade; born in the State of New York, and never south of Washington. Joseph Snevel—his true name is William H. Roberts, formerly ticket agent on Harlem railroad; then kept tavern at Yonkers, &c.; was never South. Farnum B. Wright—true name, John Waters; is lame in the knee; works in a brick-yard near Cold Spring, on Long Island, &c. John H. Patten—true name, Peter Stevens; lives at Nyack, near Piermont, on the North river; is now a justice of the peace there. Sarah Douglass and Miss Knapp—the true name of one is Dunham, who is the wife of Conover, the name of the other is Mrs. Charles Smythe; she is the sister or sister-in-law of Conover, and lives at Cold Spring, Long Island; her husband is a clerk on Blackwell's Island. McGill—his name is Neally; he is a licensed pedler in New York, and sometimes drives a one-horse cart. After so ably completing his work, Colone
Ohoopee (Georgia, United States) (search for this): chapter 1.7
cattered over the States through which his line of march lay, were on the lookout for him; with what intent may be inferred from an order issued by command of General R. H. G. Minty, by F. W. Scott, Captain and Acting Assistant Adjutant-General. It was dated near Macon, Ga., on the 8th of May, 1865, and was addressed to Lieut.-Colonel H. N. Howland, commanding a brigade. The order says: You will have every port and ferry on the Ochmulgee and Altamaha rivers, from Hawkinsville to the Ohoopee river, well guarded, and make every effort to capture or kill Jefferson Davis, the rebel ex-President, who is supposed to be endeavoring to cross the Ochmulgee, south of Macon. (104 War of Rebellion, 665.) On the 8th of May, Brevet Major-General J. H. Wilson wrote General Upton: The President of the United States has issued his proclamation announcing that the Bureau of Military Justice has reported, upon indisputable evidence, that Jefferson Davis, Clement C. Clay, Jacob Thompson, Geor
Macon (Georgia, United States) (search for this): chapter 1.7
, and some of his cabinet; his avowed object being to join the Confederate forces west of the Mississippi river. His party was too large for the success of such an undertaking. He was tracked easily by Federal troopers, who, scattered over the States through which his line of march lay, were on the lookout for him; with what intent may be inferred from an order issued by command of General R. H. G. Minty, by F. W. Scott, Captain and Acting Assistant Adjutant-General. It was dated near Macon, Ga., on the 8th of May, 1865, and was addressed to Lieut.-Colonel H. N. Howland, commanding a brigade. The order says: You will have every port and ferry on the Ochmulgee and Altamaha rivers, from Hawkinsville to the Ohoopee river, well guarded, and make every effort to capture or kill Jefferson Davis, the rebel ex-President, who is supposed to be endeavoring to cross the Ochmulgee, south of Macon. (104 War of Rebellion, 665.) On the 8th of May, Brevet Major-General J. H. Wilson wrote
Portland (Maine, United States) (search for this): chapter 1.7
e up by a newspaper correspondent, but circulation was given to it by Major-General J. H. Wilson, who, in his official report to Mr. Stanton, the Secretary of War, on the 14th of May, makes the statement, saying he derived it from the captors. Colonel Pritchard, however, makes no such statement in his published official report and correspondence. Mr James H. Parker, of Elburnville, Pa., who was one of the squad who arrested Mr. Davis, and the first to recognize him, published in the Portland (Maine) Argus, while Davis was still in confinement, a full denial of the whole story. He says that some newspaper correspondent fabricated it, and that it was regarded merely as a joke in the command. He writes: She (Mrs. Davis) behaved like a lady, and he as a gentleman, though manifestly he was chagrined at being taken into custody. Our soldiers behaved like gentlemen, as they were, and our officers like honorable, brave men, and the foolish stories that went the newspaper rounds we
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