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Browsing named entities in a specific section of Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 33. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones). Search the whole document.

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Brashear City (Louisiana, United States) (search for this): chapter 1.19
00 men, and Garland's Battalion, a total of 1,350 men at that time promiscuously armed (except the mounted infantry) with shotguns, Belgian rifles, etc. This small force contested Banks' advance as best it could, succeeding, however, in preventing parties from leaving the main column and from committing depredations on citizens on the line of march. General Banks, after making this demonstration, in connection with Farragut's fleet, returned to Baton Rouge and transferred his command to Brashear City, with the avowed purpose of reclaiming the Teche country from Confederate control. Port Hudson was thus temporarily relieved. It was at this crisis that Griersons raid was undertaken, under direction of General Grant. The entire Confederate force in the State bordering on the Mississippi was then being gathered together to meet the terrific blow which Grant was preparing to strike at Vicksburg. Thus the way was open for one of those bold cavalry raids for which heretofore only the
Clinton, La. (Louisiana, United States) (search for this): chapter 1.19
lonel Powers then established his headquarters at Freeman's plantation, on the Clinton and Port Hudson road, keeping strong scouting parties in front to watch Griershat the enemy was advancing with a large train of wagons and were then between Clinton and Port Hudson. Colonel Powers at once placed his command in motion, and ascen had assumed command of the Confederate cavalry, which was then encamped at Clinton, La. Colonel Powers still retained his office of Chief of Cavalry, and had equal of his command. General Grierson moved slowly and with great caution on the Clinton and Port Hudson road, and succeeded in capturing a scouting party and the picket posts as far as the bridge over the Amite river, which skirts the town of Clinton. About 2 o'clock in the day, Stockdale's Battalion was ordered to make a reconnuarters. The enemy's losses were still greater. After Grierson's defeat at Clinton the cavalry had but little to do outside of scouting and reconnoitering close
La Grange (Indiana, United States) (search for this): chapter 1.19
ay was open for one of those bold cavalry raids for which heretofore only the Confederates had distinguished themselves; Van Dorn, Forrest and Morgan had set the example which was to be followed by Colonel Grierson, in a bold movement from LaGrange, Tennessee, through the State of Mississippi to Baton Rouge, La. The forces placed under Colonel Grierson consisted of a brigade 1,700 strong, composed of the Sixth and Seventh Illinois and second Iowa Cavalry. Colonel Grierson, after leaving LaGrangLaGrange, Tenn., proceeded due south, between the New Orleans and Jackson Railroad (now the Illinois Central Railroad) and the Mobile and Ohio Railroad, until he reached Raleigh, Miss.; turning then southwest to Gallatin, Miss., and within seven miles of Natchez, and then back to the New Orleans and Jackson Railroad to Hazlehurst, down to Osyka, and from that point to Baton Rouge. The only serious opposition this column met with occurred near Columbus, Miss. Colonel Hatch, with the Iowa regiment, hav
Gallatin (Mississippi, United States) (search for this): chapter 1.19
on, in a bold movement from LaGrange, Tennessee, through the State of Mississippi to Baton Rouge, La. The forces placed under Colonel Grierson consisted of a brigade 1,700 strong, composed of the Sixth and Seventh Illinois and second Iowa Cavalry. Colonel Grierson, after leaving LaGrange, Tenn., proceeded due south, between the New Orleans and Jackson Railroad (now the Illinois Central Railroad) and the Mobile and Ohio Railroad, until he reached Raleigh, Miss.; turning then southwest to Gallatin, Miss., and within seven miles of Natchez, and then back to the New Orleans and Jackson Railroad to Hazlehurst, down to Osyka, and from that point to Baton Rouge. The only serious opposition this column met with occurred near Columbus, Miss. Colonel Hatch, with the Iowa regiment, having been detached with instructions to destroy the Mobile Railroad at Columbus, was attacked by a small Confederate force of home guards. In this fight Colonel Hatch was seriously wounded and his commmand dispers
Johnsonville, Tenn. (Tennessee, United States) (search for this): chapter 1.19
ire and fight their way out. On reaching the plankroad, all companies reformed, and a retrograde movement ensued. This was considered a brilliant affair, and one attended with great danger, as it was a night attack, clearly within the enemy's lines and against superior numbers, with the prospect of having Grierson's cavalry come in the rear, and thus cut off our only means of retreat. A million dollars worth of supplies intended for Banks' army were destroyed. The writer witnessed at Johnsonville, on the Tennessee river, in November, 1864, such another sight, when General Forrest destroyed Sherman's military supplies, together with several gunboats and many transports—a conflagration once seen never to be forgotten or effaced from the human mind. So strenuous had been these daring raids and attacks by the Confederate cavalry on the enemy, that General Banks at last concluded to take active measures to destroy or drive from his flank and rear the forces under Colonel Powers; and,
Jackson (Mississippi, United States) (search for this): chapter 1.19
es, many being killed and captured. The wagons were then brought back with the prisoners to Freeman's, and next day, under a guard, sent to Johnson's Army at Jackson, Miss. May 2, 1863, a courier from the front rode up to Colonel Power's headquarters and imparted to him news of great importance. Shortly thereafter, Major Stockadt Jackson, La., and were recruiting a negro regiment. Colonel Powers at once retraced his steps, and by forced marches reached Thompson's creek, a few miles from Jackson, about July 25. Gage's and Stockdale's Battalions were sent around on the Port Hudson road to cut off the enemy's retreat, while Powers, with Colonel Griffith's mounted infantry, dashed into Jackson, and, although the Federals were taken by surprise, they formed and fired a deadly volley into the advancing Confederates. Adjutant Davis, a handsome young officer, of great promise, brave and fearless, was killed at the side of Colonel Powers, in front of his ancestral home. The enemy fled
Richmond (Virginia, United States) (search for this): chapter 1.19
at section of country, he made his way in the night time within the Federal lines, and after many hairbreadth escapes, located General Dow's tent, which was stealthily approached, the sentinels being secured without noise, and General Dow captured. The escape was miraculous, for McKowen had penetrated far within the Federal lines, and only succeeded in making his escape by using the greatest precaution. General Neal Dow was safely brought to camp, and next day, under an escort, sent to Richmond, Va. Be it said to the credit of both governments that retaliatory measures at no stage of the war were resorted to. It was on the 6th day of July, 1863, that the news of the fall of Vicksburg reached Port Hudson. The gun-boats on the river announced their victory by firing a tremendous salute, which was reechoed from their land batteries, while the Federal infantry, who had worked their way close to the breastworks, shouted the news across the lines. On the 7th of July, General Gardn
Port Hudson (Louisiana, United States) (search for this): chapter 1.19
or me to write about the cavalry outside of Port Hudson without paying due regard to General Frank eneral Frank Gardner, the brave defender of Port Hudson, and the gallent men under him will receivendoning her, escaping to the shore opposite Port Hudson. The vessel soon drifted down the river anhe Teche country from Confederate control. Port Hudson was thus temporarily relieved. It was atnd dispersed. The Confederate cavalry at Port Hudson, with some mounted infantry, received march the two investing armies, joined hands and Port Hudson was then isolated. The Ninth Tennessee Batof the Mississippi River, a few miles below Port Hudson, determined at all hazard, to destroy them, and with great caution on the Clinton and Port Hudson road, and succeeded in capturing a scoutingde that besieged him while he was besieging Port Hudson. About this time there was planned at Co were unfit for action. With the fall of Port Hudson, all the Confederate cavalry were ordered t[21 more...]
Boone, N. C. (North Carolina, United States) (search for this): chapter 1.19
o cut his way out, but not before losing several men. Grierson, having deployed his brigade, made an advance on the Confederate line. A sharp engagement ensued. The two howitzers were well handled, and the enemy, believing that a strong force was in their front, retired. Later in the day their cavalry made another advance, supported by infantry, and Powers was gradually forced back, but having called for reinforcements General Gardner sent out of Port Hudson Miles' Legion, 750 strong, and Boone's battery. Gen. Miles soon deployed his men, and Boone, having placed in position his guns, a spirited engagement ensued, Boore driving Grierson back upon the infantry line of battle, while General Miles held in check the enemy's infantry until nightfall. Powers dismounted most of his cavalry and fought as infantry. As night was approachiug General Miles, after removing his dead and wounded, retired within the line of entrenchments. General Augur admitted that he had three brigades—Wei
Crystal Springs (Mississippi, United States) (search for this): chapter 1.19
rn burned with it; no meat was left, and nearly all the mules had been killed to satisfy the demand; only fifteen serviceable guns remained on the land defenses, the others having been disabled by the enfilading fire from the gunboats, whose firing was incessant, both day and night. The hospitals were full of the sick, and the men in the trenches were so exhausted and enfeebled that they were unfit for action. With the fall of Port Hudson, all the Confederate cavalry were ordered to Crystal Springs, Miss. En route to that point, a courier reached camp and communicated the news to Colonel Powers that the Federals had located a camp of instruction at Jackson, La., and were recruiting a negro regiment. Colonel Powers at once retraced his steps, and by forced marches reached Thompson's creek, a few miles from Jackson, about July 25. Gage's and Stockdale's Battalions were sent around on the Port Hudson road to cut off the enemy's retreat, while Powers, with Colonel Griffith's moun
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