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Eart Russell (search for this): article 12
ions. The Attorney General of England on the Cotton crisis. [From the London Herald, Oct. 18.] On Tuesday night Sir William Artherton, Attorney General, and M. P. for Durham, addressed a meeting of his constituents in the Town Hall in that city. The chair was occupied by Mr. John Henderson. The Attorney General observed in his speech: Sir William next referred to the subject of the foreign policy of the country, citing and expressing his adhesion to the words employed by Eart Russell at the banquet in Newcastle on the previous evening. With reference to the American war, Earl Russell had observed that nothing but mischief would appear to be possible from a continuance of that war. The sword did not bind, it sundered: and it seemed to be next to impossible that, in the event of one or the other of those States being victorious in the field, a union should be brought about in consequence which should either resemble the original Union or which should have in itself eit
William Artherton (search for this): article 12
get in, they can also get out; and, if the South desired to send us cotton, it has not lacked the opportunity. But it seems to be quite true that all cotton exportation has been forbidden by the Confederate Government in order that foreign nations may be forced to take a side in the quarrel.--It would ill become England to make herself the tool of such machinations. The Attorney General of England on the Cotton crisis. [From the London Herald, Oct. 18.] On Tuesday night Sir William Artherton, Attorney General, and M. P. for Durham, addressed a meeting of his constituents in the Town Hall in that city. The chair was occupied by Mr. John Henderson. The Attorney General observed in his speech: Sir William next referred to the subject of the foreign policy of the country, citing and expressing his adhesion to the words employed by Eart Russell at the banquet in Newcastle on the previous evening. With reference to the American war, Earl Russell had observed that nothing
ity. But it seems to be quite true that all cotton exportation has been forbidden by the Confederate Government in order that foreign nations may be forced to take a side in the quarrel.--It would ill become England to make herself the tool of such machinations. The Attorney General of England on the Cotton crisis. [From the London Herald, Oct. 18.] On Tuesday night Sir William Artherton, Attorney General, and M. P. for Durham, addressed a meeting of his constituents in the Town Hall in that city. The chair was occupied by Mr. John Henderson. The Attorney General observed in his speech: Sir William next referred to the subject of the foreign policy of the country, citing and expressing his adhesion to the words employed by Eart Russell at the banquet in Newcastle on the previous evening. With reference to the American war, Earl Russell had observed that nothing but mischief would appear to be possible from a continuance of that war. The sword did not bind, it sunder
John Henderson (search for this): article 12
xportation has been forbidden by the Confederate Government in order that foreign nations may be forced to take a side in the quarrel.--It would ill become England to make herself the tool of such machinations. The Attorney General of England on the Cotton crisis. [From the London Herald, Oct. 18.] On Tuesday night Sir William Artherton, Attorney General, and M. P. for Durham, addressed a meeting of his constituents in the Town Hall in that city. The chair was occupied by Mr. John Henderson. The Attorney General observed in his speech: Sir William next referred to the subject of the foreign policy of the country, citing and expressing his adhesion to the words employed by Eart Russell at the banquet in Newcastle on the previous evening. With reference to the American war, Earl Russell had observed that nothing but mischief would appear to be possible from a continuance of that war. The sword did not bind, it sundered: and it seemed to be next to impossible that, in t
h desired to send us cotton, it has not lacked the opportunity. But it seems to be quite true that all cotton exportation has been forbidden by the Confederate Government in order that foreign nations may be forced to take a side in the quarrel.--It would ill become England to make herself the tool of such machinations. The Attorney General of England on the Cotton crisis. [From the London Herald, Oct. 18.] On Tuesday night Sir William Artherton, Attorney General, and M. P. for Durham, addressed a meeting of his constituents in the Town Hall in that city. The chair was occupied by Mr. John Henderson. The Attorney General observed in his speech: Sir William next referred to the subject of the foreign policy of the country, citing and expressing his adhesion to the words employed by Eart Russell at the banquet in Newcastle on the previous evening. With reference to the American war, Earl Russell had observed that nothing but mischief would appear to be possible from a
gans that no effort shall be wanting to lower the present price of bread. It is its apprehensions on this head that renders it so anxious about the cotton supply, the assurance of which it sees only in a recognition of the rebel States. A complete understanding exists between England and France on the subject, and any disaster to the Union army will be followed instanter by an acknowledgement of the South. Nay, I am by no means sure that even a victory and rout under the auspices of General McClellan would alter the matter. The Orleans Princes have caused a great outcry in Europe. The English press cannot forgive them for siding with the Northern States in the present struggle. Such an example, it is felt, will have a great moral effect on all Europe; and the secret, the underhanded, the vile enemies of our glorious country spit out their venom at those noble Princes — those unfortunate young men, deserving of praise and commendation, instead of the abuse that is showered up
nce more the validity of paper blockades. Short time in the Stockport Mills. [From the Stockport (Eng) Advertiser, Oct. 17] As we anticipated, the fruits of the present partial working are thus early beginning to exhibit themselves, for in those parts of the borough where the machinery of the mills has positively ceased to run, the hands are driven to the necessity of seeking temporary existence for themselves and children by supplication for relief. Interesting letter from London. The Washington Republican, of the 29th, publishes several interesting extracts from a private letter written by a gentleman in London to a gentleman in that city, from which we extract the following: The news of the disaster at Lexington has just reached us. I will not stop to say what you know already — that it has deeply afflicted me. I send you the Times, chronicle, and Telegraph, with leaders on the subject, that will let you know what is thought of that defeat over here. But
the blockade of the Southern ports. I told you she was on the fence. You will see it announced in the Times of this day, which I send you, that Lord John Russell has said he "will consider of the propriety of sending out ships of war to raise the blockade." But do you know I think that is partly insincere? Ships of war have already left these ports, sailing westward under sealed orders. From all that I can gather between the half confidences of the press, and the cautions gossip of John Bull at his dinner table, I think that there is no doubt that the destination of those ships is to the Southern ports, where they will cruise to wait further orders, to be carried out to them by some fast sailing war steamer. What those "further orders" will be, you may easily imagine. I tell you, if we do not astonish England by such a decisive victory as shall entirely destroy the Confederate army now on the Potomac, we shall have her down upon us in aid of the South I am breathing out all
October 19th (search for this): article 12
months of the workmen, it was very difficult to understand. Therefore it was impossible, without hazarding any prediction, to look this great evil full in the face, and to consider the possibilities of the coming winter without great alarm — at least anxiety. It was to be hoped, however, that an overruling Providence might bring about events, the circumstances of which we were at present unable to discern or predict. The blockade again Questioned. From the London Shipping Gazette, October 19 The question now for the consideration of our Government and that of France is, how long shall the present state of things be suffered to continue? How long is maritime commerce to be embarrassed to suit the views of the Cabinet of Washington! If we are to acquiesce in the capture and confiscation of British ships and their cargoes, which commit no offence except that they happen to enter a port contrary to a proclamation of which they may not have heard, or, if they did, which was
October 18th (search for this): article 12
stion. We submit the following extracts, which we think worthy of the attention of our readers: Prince Napoleon reports in favor of a recognition of the Southern Confederacy.[Paris correspondence of the New York Herald, November 2] Paris Oct. 18. --I was not mistaken in the information I gave you in my last, as to the favorable report Prince Napoleon had given to the Emperor of what he conceived to be the chances of success of the South. The fact is now notorious, and the languageernment in order that foreign nations may be forced to take a side in the quarrel.--It would ill become England to make herself the tool of such machinations. The Attorney General of England on the Cotton crisis. [From the London Herald, Oct. 18.] On Tuesday night Sir William Artherton, Attorney General, and M. P. for Durham, addressed a meeting of his constituents in the Town Hall in that city. The chair was occupied by Mr. John Henderson. The Attorney General observed in his
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