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have already been made within the last twenty-four hours, by order of General Scott, of persons who have recently arrived in this city, and who register their names on the hotel books as coming from the North. These persons are believed to be spies, and are undergoing a most rigid examination. If detected, short work will be made of them. Two were seized in their rooms at Willard's Hotel last night. arrest of A Suspected spy. Washington, May 17.--A man by the name of Wood, from Newark, was arrested as a spy yesterday, by order of General Scott. Wood commenced his operations by tampering with the members of the Newark Regiment, through which means he obtained an introduction to Gen. Runyon, and thence to Gen. Scott, who became fascinated with his plausible story, and employed him as a secret agent of the Government to go South. Wood received some money from the Secret Service Fund to pay his expenses. Before leaving the city he expended a portion of his funds in liquor,
Letter to a traitor. An officer at Camp Allen requests us to publish the following letter, addressed to an individual in Newark, New Jersey; though, as none of our papers go beyond Mason and Dixon's line with our consent, there is very little probability that it will ever reach its destination through this medium: Camp Allen, June 1, 1861. To Dr. Thomas Lafon, Newark, N. J. Sir: Having received from my wife (your niece) an extract from a letter recently written by you to her mNewark, N. J. Sir: Having received from my wife (your niece) an extract from a letter recently written by you to her mother, in which this passage occurs: "The North is fully aroused now, and we are pouring troops into Washington farther than they can receive them, and by the first of July will have two hundred thousand there. I am calm amidst the storm, and perhaps we will visit you when the storm blows over. Should there be a battle in or about the vicinity of Richmond, I may be along to take care of the wounded. What are they doing in your State? We hear but little from you" I will answer, (without
ultimate result of which the wisest cannot foresee. Resolved, That we are opposed to civil war, prosecuted for the subjugation or destruction of the seceded States, while it is possible amicably to settle the difficulties now existing. Resolved, That we are opposed to the prosecution of a war against the seceded States, waged under any circumstances, for the purpose of emancipating the slaves in the Southern slaveholding States. Another peace movement. We find from the Newark (N. J.) papers that the people of that city who are in favor of peace are holding meetings to express their views. At an adjourned meeting held one evening last week, the following resolution was unanimously adopted: Whereas, That in view of the present deplorable condition of the country, the members of this meeting deem it their duty, and in accordance with their constitutional rights, to petition the Congress of the United States about to assemble, to interpose (if in their judgment it
The Daily Dispatch: November 12, 1860., [Electronic resource], The Press on the State of the country. (search)
Holmes' Hole. Nov. --Sl'd, schr. E. H. Nickerson from Boston for Richmond. Philadelphia. Nov. 8.--Cl'd, schr. M. J. Guest, Richmond. Nov. 9-- Cl'd, schr. Lizzie Taylor, Richmond Nov. 10 --Cl'd, schr. Maria Jane, Richmond. Boston, Nov. 7.--Arr'd. schr. Susan. Richmond. New York, Nov. 9--Cl'd, schrs. Wythe, Richmond; Senator, Norfolk Nov. 10-- Cl'd, steamship York town, Richmond. Savannah, Nov. 6.--Arrived, schr. D. Town-send, Richmond Newark, Nov. 9.--Arrived, schr. Clingman, Richmond. New Bedford, Nov. 9.--Sailed, schr. Gen. Taylor, Norfolk. Alexandria, Nov. 10.--Sl'd, schrs. Rebecca C. Wilson, Fredericksburg; A. Holley, Norfolk.
Singular Accident. --A man named John Murray, living in Newark, N. J., on Saturday evening placed the muzzle of a loaded gun barrel, detached from the stock, to his mouth, and while blowing into it, the muzzle came in contact with a lighted candle, discharging the weapon. Murry's head was blown off, and portions of his skull and brains scattered about the room. The barrel rebounded, and striking his mother-in-law, ten feel distant, penetrated four inches into her chest. It is believed she cannot survive.
Fatal accidents at Newark. Newark, Dec. 3. --Elizabeth Burns, the woman injured by the gun explosion on Saturday night which killed Murray, died of her injuries this morning. A man named Miller was frozen to death on the meadows east of Newark on Saturday night. Fatal accidents at Newark. Newark, Dec. 3. --Elizabeth Burns, the woman injured by the gun explosion on Saturday night which killed Murray, died of her injuries this morning. A man named Miller was frozen to death on the meadows east of Newark on Saturday night.
The accident in Newark. --The singular accident in Newark, N. J., on Saturday night, by which two persons lost their lives, has been noticed. One of the victims, John Murray, a young married man, while cleaning a gun from which he had taken the stock, put the muzzle in his mouth, and holding the barrel so that the nipple was near a burning candle, tried to see if he could agitate the flame by blowing through it, thus testing whether it contained a load. By the unsteadiness of his hands, Newark, N. J., on Saturday night, by which two persons lost their lives, has been noticed. One of the victims, John Murray, a young married man, while cleaning a gun from which he had taken the stock, put the muzzle in his mouth, and holding the barrel so that the nipple was near a burning candle, tried to see if he could agitate the flame by blowing through it, thus testing whether it contained a load. By the unsteadiness of his hands, it is supposed, the nipple came in contact with the flame and the barrel was discharged, blowing the poor fellow's head into a hundred fragments, and rebounding with tremendous force. struck his mother-in-law, who sat directly opposite him, and penetrated her right breast, just below the collar-bone, to the depth of six inches. The light was extinguished by the explosion, and the young wife, in hurrying across the room to her wounded mother, fell over the dead body of her husband, which was th
The Daily Dispatch: December 12, 1860., [Electronic resource], Important Decision to Railroad Travelers. (search)
ce of the company to get tickets for Metuchin by the 3:20 train. When the conductor came round for his tickets, plaintiff mentioned that he would have to stop at Newark; thereupon the conductor asked for his fare to Newark, and would not receive the ticket tendered him by the plaintiff, and for which he had paid the sum of fifty Newark, and would not receive the ticket tendered him by the plaintiff, and for which he had paid the sum of fifty cents; but he insisted on the fare to Newark, and on refusal of plaintiff to pay, he ejected him by force from the cars, about a mile and a half from Jersey City, and left him there to take care of himself. On the other hand, however, it was proved that the plaintiff was in the wrong train; the train that he should have takenNewark, and on refusal of plaintiff to pay, he ejected him by force from the cars, about a mile and a half from Jersey City, and left him there to take care of himself. On the other hand, however, it was proved that the plaintiff was in the wrong train; the train that he should have taken did not leave until forty minutes after the train in which they took passage; that by the rules of the company all tickets were to be used on a continuous train; a ticket for Metuchin or New Brunswick did not authorize a passenger to leave the train at any intermediate place without giving up his ticket; that in this case Mr. Jon
Sudden death at a prayer meeting. --Benj. Mead, aged eighty-one years, dropped dead at the Market street morning prayer meeting, in Newark, N. J., on Monday, from disease of the heart.
Fires. --A destructive conflagration occurred at Orange, N. J., on Friday night, involving the loss of eight stores, the market and the Post Office. The Methodist Church, a fine building, which cost $10,000, was partially destroyed, and had it not been for the arrival of some fire companies from Newark the edifice would have been entirely consumed. The fire lasted for nearly five hours. The Goshen (Ia.) Democrat states that a destructive fire occurred on Monday, the 3d inst., in Elkhart. The Clifton block, including the Clifton Hotel, and the stores underneath it, was entirely destroyed. The entire loss is in the neighborhood of $30,000, on which there was an insurance of about $15,000.
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