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h was one of the most important places in the Confederacy, on account of its immense founderies of cannon and projectiles. Wilson advanced to the attack at once. Long's division, on the right, struck the first blow. Dismounting most of his men,he made a charge so heavy and irresistible, that it broke Forrest's line. Four mountreek) with high and precipitous banks, and the other (Valley Creek) an almost impassable mire. Toward this the troopers pressed on the morning of the 2d of April, Long's division leading in the pursuit of Forrest, Upton's following. At four o'clock in the afternoon, Wilson's whole force in pursuit, came in sight of Selma, and pr West Point, La Grange crossed the river, burned the bridges behind him, and moved on April 17. due east toward Macon, in Georgia. On the same day, Minty's (late Long's) division moved from Columbus for the same destination, and Upton's marched the next day. Minty, accompanied by Wilson, arrived at Macon on the 20th, when the Co
J. McArthur (search for this): chapter 19
le, up the east side of the bay, along the Belle, Rose and Blakely roads, which were made perilous by torpedoes, that killed several men and horses. They met with skirmishers only, and on the next day were in the neighborhood of Spanish Fort, seven miles due east from Mobile. Canby perceived the necessity of reducing this work before passing on to Blakely; and, on the following morning, March 27. before ten o'clock, it was completely invested, on the land side. The divisions of Carr and McArthur, of the Sixteenth Corps, were, at first, on the right, the extreme of the former resting on Bayou Minette, and Benton's division of the Thirteenth Corps, was on the left, its extreme touching at Belle Rose. The remainder of the Sixteenth Corps seriously threatened Blakeley. Steele came up a few days afterward and joined that corps, and his troops then formed the extreme right in front of Blakely. Thatcher's squadron had moved up the bay parallel with the army, as far as the shallow water
C. T. Lieurner (search for this): chapter 19
ther operations in the interior. The conduct of the expedition against Mobile was assigned to General E. R. S. Canby, then commanding the West Mississippi Army, with headquarters at New Orleans; and the co-operating movement was intrusted to General J. H. Wilson, the eminent cavalry leader, under the direction of General Thomas. Mobile, at the beginning of 1865, was thoroughly fortified by three continuous lines of earth-works around the entire city. The first was constructed by Captain C. T. Lieurner, in 1862, at an average distance of three miles out from the business streets, and comprised fifteen redoubts. In 1863, after the fall of Vicksburg, when an attack upon Mobile was expected, General D. Leadbetter See page 174, volume I., and page 38, volume II. constructed a second line of works, which passed through the suburbs of the city, comprising sixteen inclosed and strong redoubts. It was then estimated that a garrison of ten thousand effective men might, with these forti
B. F. Cheatham (search for this): chapter 19
out twenty-two thousand men and horses, were encamped on the north side of the Tennessee River, at Gravelly Springs and Waterloo, in Lauderdale County, Alabama. These had been thoroughly disciplined, when, in March, 1865. they were prepared for an expedition into Alabama, having for its object co-operation with Canby in the reduction of Mobile, and the capture of important places, particularly Selma, on the Alabama River, where the Confederates had extensive iron founderies. The march of Cheatham toward the Carolinas, with a part of Hood's broken army, and the employment of the remainder at Mobile, made nearly the whole of Thomas's force in Tennessee, disposable, and Wilson left Chickasaw Landing, on the Tennessee River, on the 22d of March, with about thirteen thousand men, composing the divisions of Long, Upton and McCook. Knipe's division, we have seen, went with the Sixteenth Army Corps to New Orleans. Hatch's division was left at Eastport. He had six batteries. His men wer
Gordon Granger (search for this): chapter 19
necessary preliminary movement. Had Farragut then known how weakly Mobile was defended, he and Granger might easily have captured it. At that time there were no troops in or immediately about the strong work, commanding the railway and the Chattahochee River. But a large re-enforcement of Granger's command would have been neceseary to have enabled the National forces to hold the post. They batteries, were organized as the Thirteenth Army Corps, comprising three divisions, and General Gordon Granger was assigned to its command. Meanwhile, the Sixteenth Army Corps (General A. J. Smith),ouri, below the city; and on the evening of the 12th, after a summons to surrender, made by General Granger and Rear-Admiral Thatcher, the authorities formally gave the place into their hands at Batts, and kept from the streets; and the publication of four of the newspapers was suspended. General Granger followed the army into the city, and General Canby and his staff entered soon afterward.
Ira Harris (search for this): chapter 19
made inaudible to the armies, by the roar of cannon. Hawkins's division first skirmished heavily toward the works, when Garrard sent one-third of his command, This division, composed of the brigades of General Gilbert and Colonels Rinaker and Harris. was the strongest in Canby's army. under a heavy fire of the Seventeenth Ohio Battery, and in the face of a storm of shells, to discover the safest avenues for an attack in force. These gained a point within fifty yards of the works, and foundtimes recoiling as the dreadful storm of shells and canister-shot became more dreadful, yet continually making headway, inspirited by the voice of Garrard, who was in the thickest of the fight. At length, the obstructions were cleared, and while Harris's brigade was passing the ditch and climbing the face of the works, those of Gilbert and Rinaker turned the right of the fort and entered it, capturing General Thomas and a thousand men. In an instant, a loud cheer arose, and several National fla
Andrew Jackson (search for this): chapter 19
ended by its arrival on the 31st, April, 1865. after many adventures. We left Croxton not far from Tuscaloosa, in Alabama, on the 2d of April, outnumbered by Jackson, of Forrest's command. See page 516. From that point he moved rapidly to Johnson's Ferry, on the Black Warrior, fourteen miles above Tuscaloosa, where he crossent of American history, for its. banks and its bosom, from Montgomery to Mobile, are clustered with the most stirring associations of the Creek War, in which General Jackson and his Tennesseeans, and Claiborne, Flournoy, and others, appear conspicuous, with Weatherford as the central figure in the group of Creek chieftains. We Orleans, were objects of special interest, when considering the inscriptions upon each, in their relation to the rebellion. One was the equestrian statue of Andrew Jackson, in Jackson Square, the principal place of public resort on fine days and evenings, where the citizens may enjoy the fresh air and perfumes of flowers. On th
Joseph E. Johnston (search for this): chapter 19
e line of fortifications, was Fort Sidney Johnston. In the harbor were two floating batteries and four stationary ones, named, respectively, Tighlman, Gladden, Canal, and McIntosh. The channels were obstructed by piles in many rows. General J. E. Johnston said Mobile was the best fortified place in the Confederacy. It was garrisoned by about fifteen thousand men, including the troops on the east side of the bay, and a thousand negro laborers, subject to the command of the engineers. Thesces there surrendered without resistance; and Wilson was informed by Howell Cobb, of the surrender of Lee to Grant, and the virtual ending of the war. Hostile operations were then, suspended, in accordance with an arrangement between Sherman and Johnston, which we shall consider presently. La Grange rejoined the main column soon after its arrival at Macon, but Croxton's brigade was still absent, and Wilson felt some uneasiness concerning its safety. All apprehensions were ended by its arriva
April 17th (search for this): chapter 19
he entire garrison, with the guns, and about five hundred small-arms. General Tyler and eighteen of his men were killed, and twenty-seven were wounded. At the same time the Fourth Indiana Cavalry dashed through the village, drove the Confederates from their works at the bridges, and took possession of those structures. After destroying nineteen locomotives and three hundred and forty-five loaded cars at West Point, La Grange crossed the river, burned the bridges behind him, and moved on April 17. due east toward Macon, in Georgia. On the same day, Minty's (late Long's) division moved from Columbus for the same destination, and Upton's marched the next day. Minty, accompanied by Wilson, arrived at Macon on the 20th, when the Confederate forces there surrendered without resistance; and Wilson was informed by Howell Cobb, of the surrender of Lee to Grant, and the virtual ending of the war. Hostile operations were then, suspended, in accordance with an arrangement between Sherman and
rts from Fort Gaines to Danley's Ferry. Meanwhile, a feint on Mobile was made to attract attention while the main body was concentrating at Fish River. This was done by Moore's brigade of the Sixteenth Corps, which landed, with artillery, on Cedar Point, on the west side of the bay, under fire of the squadron. They drove away the Confederate occupants of the Point, and followed them to Fowle River, where the pursuers were ordered to cross the bay and rejoin the corps, which they did on the 23d. March, 1865. The movement had created much uneasiness in Mobile, for Moore's force was reported there to be from four thousand to six thousand strong. While these movements were in progress on the borders of the bay, General Steele, with Hawkins's division of negro troops, and Lucas's cavalry, had been marching from Pensacola to Blakely, ten miles north of Mobile, destroying, on the way, the railroad at Pollard, and inducing the belief that Canby's real objective was Montgomery, and not
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