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Browsing named entities in a specific section of Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 17. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones). Search the whole document.

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January 10th, 1861 AD (search for this): chapter 1.12
d the measure to the last, and a test resolution, declaring it to be the right and duty of Georgia to secede, passed the convention on the 18th of January, 1861, by a vote of only 165 to 130, and, after the adoption of this resolution, the ordinance of secession was opposed the next day by 89 members against 208 voting in favor of it. In Alabama the ordinance was adopted by the convention on the 11th of January by a vote of 61 to 39. In Florida the ordinance was adopted on the 10th of January, 1861, by a vote of 62 to 7, but was not submitted to the people. In Mississippi the ordinance was adopted on the 9th of January, 1861, by a vote of 84 to 15, and was not submitted to the people. In Louisiana the ordinance was adopted in convention on the 25th of January, 1861 by a vote of 113 to 17, the convention refusing to submit it to the people by a vote of 84 to 45. In Texas the ordinance was approved by a vote of the people, the Governor of the State standing stoutly in opp
January 9th, 1861 AD (search for this): chapter 1.12
n the 18th of January, 1861, by a vote of only 165 to 130, and, after the adoption of this resolution, the ordinance of secession was opposed the next day by 89 members against 208 voting in favor of it. In Alabama the ordinance was adopted by the convention on the 11th of January by a vote of 61 to 39. In Florida the ordinance was adopted on the 10th of January, 1861, by a vote of 62 to 7, but was not submitted to the people. In Mississippi the ordinance was adopted on the 9th of January, 1861, by a vote of 84 to 15, and was not submitted to the people. In Louisiana the ordinance was adopted in convention on the 25th of January, 1861 by a vote of 113 to 17, the convention refusing to submit it to the people by a vote of 84 to 45. In Texas the ordinance was approved by a vote of the people, the Governor of the State standing stoutly in opposition. The popular vote stood 34,794 for and 11,235 against secession. The whole vote cast in the presidential election in Novem
January 16th, 1861 AD (search for this): chapter 1.12
the people, a large minority of whom were opposed to the measures which had led to the establishment of the government. In the convention of South Carolina, at least, there was some doubt and some debate, as I have shown, about the causes of secession, the discussion occurring, curiously enough, after the act of secession had been consummated. If we now turn to the border slave States we shall find a marked difference of opinion and feeling. The people of Arkansas voted on the 16th of January, 1861, on the proposition to call a convention to decide upon the subject of secession. It was determined to hold a convention by a vote of 27,412 for and 15,826 against the measure, out of a voting population of 54,053, as shown by the vote cast at the presidential election in November, 1860, indicating that the people were nearly divided. The convention assembled on the 4th of March following, and on the 18th rejected an ordinance of secession by a vote of 35 to 39 against it. In N
ly to effect a peaceful adjustment of the troubles of the country and prevent the permanent disruption of the Union. The records of the convention abound with evidence of the devotion of the great body of its members to the Union, and of their earnest efforts to avert a resort to force as a means of preserving it. As late as April 4, 1861, the convention refused to submit an ordinance of secession to the people for their approval by a vote of 45 for to 80 against the proposition. On the 6th of April the convention rejected a resolution declaring that Virginia considered that the Federal Government ought to recognize the independence of the seceded States and enter into treaties with them. As late as April 11th three resolutions containing declarations in favor of the withdrawal of Virginia from the Union under certain conditions were rejected by decisive and significant majorities. Without going into the details of the action of Kentucky and Missouri during the same time, it is e
nion, and of their earnest efforts to avert a resort to force as a means of preserving it. As late as April 4, 1861, the convention refused to submit an ordinance of secession to the people for their approval by a vote of 45 for to 80 against the proposition. On the 6th of April the convention rejected a resolution declaring that Virginia considered that the Federal Government ought to recognize the independence of the seceded States and enter into treaties with them. As late as April 11th three resolutions containing declarations in favor of the withdrawal of Virginia from the Union under certain conditions were rejected by decisive and significant majorities. Without going into the details of the action of Kentucky and Missouri during the same time, it is enough to say that prior to April 15, 1861, the people of those States were, if possible, more decided in their opposition to secession than the people of Virginia. In Maryland, before the date I have mentioned, practically
October 24th, 1870 AD (search for this): chapter 1.12
cert of action in regard to the proceeding contemplated. I would also invite to that conference the surviving officers and soldiers of all the other Confederate armies as well as the officers, sailors and marines of the Confederate navy. The call would have been made sooner, but for my absence, up to this time, in a country where there are no railroads or telegraphs, and where I was detained by imperative duties. Your friend and late fellow-soldier, Jubal A. Early. Lynchburg, Va., October 24, 1870. Pursuant to this call there assembled at the First Presbyteriar Church, in Richmond, on Thursday evening, November 3d, 1870, the grandest gathering of Confederate soldiers which had met since the war. This church then stood upon the upper portion of the site now occupied by our imposing City Hall. Among the leading officers who participated in the meeting were Generals Early, John B. Gordon, Edward Johnson, I. R. Trimble, W. B. Taliaferro, William Smith, W. N. Pendleton, Fitz.
October 25th, 1870 AD (search for this): chapter 1.12
overty of the people of the South, and the entire prostration of their resources resultant from the war, the success of the ladies was highly creditable in their speedy collection of fully $15,000—a tribute of devotion met by personal sacrifice. Lee Monument Association. The next move towards the monument was instituted by Lieutenant General Jubal A. Early, the senior surviving officer of the Army of Northern Virginia, in the following address, which appeared in the public prints October 25th, 1870: To the Surviving Officers and Soldiers of the Army of Northern Virginia: Comrades—The sad tidings of the death of our great commander came at a time when, by the interruption of all the ordinary modes of traveling, very many of us were debarred the privilege of participating in the funeral ceremonies of attending the burial of him we loved so well, or by concerted action of giving expression to our feelings on the occasion. While the unburied remains of the illustrious hero we
October 27th, 1887 AD (search for this): chapter 1.12
d that the height of the statue, including the bronze plate, should be six and one-half metres (about twenty-one feet), and the price of the same increased to 90,000 francs, instead of the original price of 60,000 francs. On March 13th, 1889, on the motion of General Lee, and by a unanimous vote of the board, Colonel Archer Anderson was invited to deliver the address at the unveiling of the Lee Monument. Laying of the Corner-stone. The corner-stone of the Lee Monument was laid October 27th, 1887. Notwithstanding that the day was most disagreeably wet, being a continuation of a three days rain, the procession was imposing. The military from different portions of the State participated, whilst four hundred and fifty Marylanders were present under the command of General Bradley T. Johnson. All of Richmond turned out. The column was led by Governor Fitzhugh Lee, accompanied by General Wade Hampton, followed by his regular aides, and General John R. Cooke, chief of staff fo
t the proposition. On the 6th of April the convention rejected a resolution declaring that Virginia considered that the Federal Government ought to recognize the independence of the seceded States and enter into treaties with them. As late as April 11th three resolutions containing declarations in favor of the withdrawal of Virginia from the Union under certain conditions were rejected by decisive and significant majorities. Without going into the details of the action of Kentucky and Missoion on the 24th of June by a vote of 104,019 to 47,238, as announced by the Governor. In the Virginia convention, which had refused to adopt an ordinance of secession on the 4th of April, 1861, by a vote of 89 to 45, and which as late as the 11th of April had refused to adopt a conditional declaration in favor of secession, on the 17th of April an ordinance of secession was adopted by a vote of 88 to 55, and the majority vote was afterwards increased to 91. The change in the feeling of the
January 25th, 1861 AD (search for this): chapter 1.12
next day by 89 members against 208 voting in favor of it. In Alabama the ordinance was adopted by the convention on the 11th of January by a vote of 61 to 39. In Florida the ordinance was adopted on the 10th of January, 1861, by a vote of 62 to 7, but was not submitted to the people. In Mississippi the ordinance was adopted on the 9th of January, 1861, by a vote of 84 to 15, and was not submitted to the people. In Louisiana the ordinance was adopted in convention on the 25th of January, 1861 by a vote of 113 to 17, the convention refusing to submit it to the people by a vote of 84 to 45. In Texas the ordinance was approved by a vote of the people, the Governor of the State standing stoutly in opposition. The popular vote stood 34,794 for and 11,235 against secession. The whole vote cast in the presidential election in November, 1860, by the people of Texas was 62,986, being nearly 7,000 more than the vote on the ordinance of secession. The 17,000 votes withheld fro
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