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Runaway in jail. --Was committed to the jail of Louisa county, as a runaway on the 30th day of July 1862, a small Negro boy, who says his name is Charles, and that he belongs to Lieut West, of Louisiana. He appears to be about ten or twelve years old, is four feet high, of a brown color, and had on when committed to jail a blue sack coat brown jeans pantaloons, and a blue cloth cap. The owner of said boy is required to come forward and prove his property, pay charges, and take him away, or he will be disposed of as the law directs. James R Gooch, Sheriff and Jailor of Louisa county. mh 16--1aw6w*
Runaway in jail. --Was committed to the jail of Louisa county, as a runaway on the 20th day of July, 1862, a small negro Boy, who says his name is Charles, and that he belongs to Lieut West, of Louisiana. He appears to be about tan or twelve years old is four feet high, of a brown color, and had on when committed to jail a blue sack coat, brown jeans pantaloons, and a blue cloth cap. The owner of said boy is required to come forward and prove his property, pay charges and take him away, or he will be disposed of as the law directs. James R Gooch, Sheriff and Jailor of Loutes county. mh 16--law6w*
Runaway in jail. --Was committed to the jail of Louisa county, as a runaway, on the 30th day of July, 1863, a small negro Boy, who says his name is Charles, and that he belongs to Lieut West, of Louisiana. He appears to be about ten or twelve years old, is four feet high, of a brown color, and had on when committed to jail a blue sack coat, brown jeans pantaloons, and a blue cloth cap. The owner of said boy is required to come forward and prove his property, pay charges, and take him away, or he will be disposed of as the law directs. James R Gooch, Sheriff, and Jafter of Louisa county. mh 26--1awcw*
The Daily Dispatch: May 5, 1863., [Electronic resource], Seizure of a Confederate gunboat at Liverpool.--a shipyard under Surveilllance. (search)
Runaway in jail. --Was committee to the jail of Louisa county, or a runaway on the 30th day of July, 1862, a small negro boy, who says his name is Charles, and that he belongs to Lieut West, of Louisiana. He appears to be about ten or twelve years old is four feet high, of a brown color, and had on when committeed to jail a blue sack coat brown jeans pantaloons, and a blue cloth cap. The owner of said boy is required to come forward and prove his property, pay charges, and take him away, or he will be disposed of as the law directs. James R. Gooch, Sheriff and Jaller of Louisa county. mh 26--1ow5w*
The Daily Dispatch: May 13, 1863., [Electronic resource], List of Casualties in the battles near Fredericksburg. (search)
List of Casualties in the battles near Fredericksburg. Casualties in the Washington Artillery battalion, of New Orleans, at Fredericksburg, May 3d: first company--Killed: Sergt W H West, corporal T J Lutman, private J H Florence wounded: Corpl C a Everett. Prisoners: Capt Squires, Lts Owen and Galbraith, Sergt Hardie, Privates Alsohook, Berthelot, Bogent, Tellowes, Hanly, Harris, McCormick, Micose, Myers, Phelps, E Peshand, C Peshand, Florence, Siebault Turner, T S Turner, Vincent, Eshman Hock, Kennedy, Ryerson Smith. Second company--wounded: Lt Derussy, Privates Kirk and Coln. Prisoners: Privates Summers, Coleman, Giffern. third company--Killed: Corpl R P many. Wounded: Privates Adams and frank. Captured: Sergeant Handy, Privates noble and Dicks. Fourth company--Killed: Corp'l Lewis. Wounded: Corp'l Valentine, Privates Callahan and Anderson. the 1st company lost one Napoleon and one 3 inch rifle gun; the 2d company lost one 12 pounder Howitzer; the 3
The Daily Dispatch: May 13, 1863., [Electronic resource], Funeral procession in honor of Lieut. Gen. Thos. J. Jackson. (search)
Runaway in jail. --Was committed to the jail of Louisa county, as a runaway, on the 30th day of July, 1862, a small negro Boy, who says his name is Charles, and that he belongs to Lieut West, of Louisiana. He appears to be about ten or twelve years old is four feet high, of a brown color, and had on when committed to jail a blue sack coat, brown jeans pantaloons, and a blue cloth cap. The owner of said boy is required to come forward and prove his property, pay charges, and take him away, or he will be disposed of as the law directs. James R Gooch, Sheriff, and Jailor of Louise county. mh 26--1aw6w*
The Daily Dispatch: June 5, 1863., [Electronic resource], Les Miserables; a novel, by Victor Hugo. (search)
Les Miserables; a novel, by Victor Hugo. --We have received from the publishers, Messrs. West & Johnston, the first part of this long-expected and intensely dramatic work, which has created such an immense serration in Europe. Although partaking of the exaggeration of the modern French school of fiction, it is a work of great power and eloquence, and will be read with absorbing interest. Fantine--such is the title of this first part — is a complete novel in itself, and will shortly be followed by Cosette, an equally interesting romance; the opening chapters, by the way, contain the most graphic description of the battle of Waterloo we have seen anywhere. The whole series, consisting of five parts, will be issued in four volumes — the third and fourth parts constituting one volume. Let every novel reader get a copy of Fantin
New Publications. --The enterprising firm of West & Johnston, in this city, have just published a new novel by Wilkie Collins, the author of "The Woman in White." No Name--such is the title of the book — is beautifully got up and will doubtless meet with a very rapid sale. In addition to the above, Messrs. West & Johnston are now printing a new production emanating from the gifted pen of the author of "Beulah," Miss Evans, of Mobile. They also propose to issue a new weekly paper, "Ththis city, have just published a new novel by Wilkie Collins, the author of "The Woman in White." No Name--such is the title of the book — is beautifully got up and will doubtless meet with a very rapid sale. In addition to the above, Messrs. West & Johnston are now printing a new production emanating from the gifted pen of the author of "Beulah," Miss Evans, of Mobile. They also propose to issue a new weekly paper, "The Record," to be edited by a well-known and talented Southern write
The Record. --This new weekly, recently announced by Messrs. West & Johnston, made its appearance yesterday morning, and will be issued regularly on Thursday of each week. It is will printed on paper uncommonly good for these times. Its character is two-fold, viz: That of an abstract chronicle of the times and a literary magazine. In the former department will be presented the events of the war; leading features of the Confederate cause; general acts of Congress, immediately interesting to the army and the people; proceedings of the courts; and brief notices of foreign and domestic news. The latter department will be conducted after the manner of the Eclectic Magazine, or Littell's Living Age.--being chiefly selected from the best sources, with an occasional original paper or poem. The first number is a good beginning upon the plan of the publishers. Their paper fills a niche not occupied in the periodical literature of the South, and we hope it will meet with liberal e
e's attention to his right, while Gordon's division was to go up and attack him in front. When Gordon's advance reached the Twelve mile ordinary he sent forward a regiment of infantry, two squadrons of cavalry and a section of artillery, under Col. West. to attack the force which it was supposed Wise would leave at Diascund Bridge after sending a portion of his troops to the Chickahominy to stop the advance there. At the same time two regiments of infantry were sent up the Centreville road to get in rear of Diascund and capture the Confederates when they should be driven in by Col. West. Of course the trapping of Wise proved a dead failure. Of the expedition which landed at the White House with Keyed, nothing is said. The correspondent says Peck is advancing from Suffolk. Miscellaneous. John Morgan has creased into Kentucky, with 5,000 rebel cavalry. Only 21 regiments have been sent from other States to aid Pennsylvania in driving back the Confederates. A Pen
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