hide Sorting

You can sort these results in two ways:

By entity
Chronological order for dates, alphabetical order for places and people.
By position (current method)
As the entities appear in the document.

You are currently sorting in ascending order. Sort in descending order.

hide Most Frequent Entities

The entities that appear most frequently in this document are shown below.

Entity Max. Freq Min. Freq
William T. Sherman 848 2 Browse Search
Fitzhugh Lee 615 1 Browse Search
Charleston (South Carolina, United States) 439 1 Browse Search
Washington (United States) 392 0 Browse Search
Chattanooga (Tennessee, United States) 374 0 Browse Search
George G. Meade 374 2 Browse Search
Joseph Hooker 371 1 Browse Search
Jefferson Davis 355 1 Browse Search
J. B. Hood 344 2 Browse Search
Braxton Bragg 343 1 Browse Search
View all entities in this document...

Browsing named entities in a specific section of Benson J. Lossing, Pictorial Field Book of the Civil War. Volume 3.. Search the whole document.

Found 1,345 total hits in 247 results.

... 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25
April 20th (search for this): chapter 19
all of Blakely, Maury ordered the evacuation of Mobile; and on the 11th, after sinking the powerful rams Huntsville and Tuscaloosa, It is a curious fact that a very large proportion of the most powerful iron-clad vessels constructed by the Confederates, were destroyed by their own hands. Only a few days after the evacuation of Mobile the Confederate ram Webb, from the Red River, freighted with cotton, rosin, and other merchandise, went down the Mississippi, passing New Orleans on the 20th of April, so unexpectedly that she received but two shots as she went by, from batteries there, the vessels of war being yet in Mobile Bay. The Webb was pursued by gun-boats from above, and was hurrying toward the Gulf, when she encountered the corvette Richmond, coming up the river. The commander of the ram, seeing no chance for escape, ran her ashore and blew her up. He and the crew took refuge in the swamps, but nearly all of them were captured. he fled up the Alabama River, with nine thousa
urrendered without resistance; and Wilson was informed by Howell Cobb, of the surrender of Lee to Grant, and the virtual ending of the war. Hostile operations were then, suspended, in accordance with an arrangement between Sherman and Johnston, which we shall consider presently. La Grange rejoined the main column soon after its arrival at Macon, but Croxton's brigade was still absent, and Wilson felt some uneasiness concerning its safety. All apprehensions were ended by its arrival on the 31st, April, 1865. after many adventures. We left Croxton not far from Tuscaloosa, in Alabama, on the 2d of April, outnumbered by Jackson, of Forrest's command. See page 516. From that point he moved rapidly to Johnson's Ferry, on the Black Warrior, fourteen miles above Tuscaloosa, where he crossed that stream, and sweeping down its western bank, surprised and captured April 5. the place he had been sent against from Elyton, together with three guns and about fifty prisoners. Then he destr
ndred and seventy-five made prisoners. Among the latter was their leader. Steele found very little opposition after that until he reached the front of Blakely, April 1. where he received supplies from General Canby, sent in seventy-five wagons in charge of General J. C. Veatch. On the 25th of March, the. Thirteenth and Sixteeallo, but were again routed with a loss of fifty men made prisoners. Upton bivouacked fourteen miles south of Montevallo that night, and early the next morning April 1. rode into Randolph unmolested. There he captured a courier, whose dispatches informed him that Forrest was now on his front in heavy force; that one of that learigade followed them as far as Plantersville, nineteen miles from Selma, where the chase ceased, and the victors bivouacked. Forrest had been driven on that day April 1, twenty-four miles. Selma was now the grand objective of pursued and pursuers. Because of its importance, it had been strongly fortified on its land side.
about one hundred feet above the Alabama River, and was flanked by two streams; one (Beech Creek) with high and precipitous banks, and the other (Valley Creek) an almost impassable mire. Toward this the troopers pressed on the morning of the 2d of April, Long's division leading in the pursuit of Forrest, Upton's following. At four o'clock in the afternoon, Wilson's whole force in pursuit, came in sight of Selma, and prepared for an immediate assault. Forrest was already there, and found himon's brigade was still absent, and Wilson felt some uneasiness concerning its safety. All apprehensions were ended by its arrival on the 31st, April, 1865. after many adventures. We left Croxton not far from Tuscaloosa, in Alabama, on the 2d of April, outnumbered by Jackson, of Forrest's command. See page 516. From that point he moved rapidly to Johnson's Ferry, on the Black Warrior, fourteen miles above Tuscaloosa, where he crossed that stream, and sweeping down its western bank, surpr
ge as the men could carry, for the purpose of occupying Claiborne, on the Alabama River, to prevent troops coming down to the relief of Mobile. He left on the 5th of April, and on the 7th he met a negro with dispatches from General Wilson to General Canby, carefully sewed up in the collar of his vest. Lucas furnished him with a Johnson's Ferry, on the Black Warrior, fourteen miles above Tuscaloosa, where he crossed that stream, and sweeping down its western bank, surprised and captured April 5. the place he had been sent against from Elyton, together with three guns and about fifty prisoners. Then he destroyed the military school and other public properd at Savannah from Hilton Head See page 488. the first week in April, and after visiting places of historic interest there, left that city on an evening train April 5. for Augusta and farther west. Travel had not yet been resumed, to a great extent. The roads were in a rough condition, the cars were wretched in accommodations
ing, and, at intervals throughout the siege, hurled a 100-pound shell into the fort. The squadron did good service, not only in shelling the works, but in driving the Confederate vessels so far to-ward the city, that their fire failed to reach the besiegers. The National vessels kept up a steady fire all day, and retired at night to anchorage at Great Point Clear. In these operations of the squadron, two of the gunboats (Milwaukee and Osage) were destroyed by torpedoes. When, on the 3d of April, the Nationals had built an earth-work and mounted large guns upon it within two hundred yards of the fort, the latter was completely and closely invested, and its doom was sealed. Yet the garrison fought bravely on, and the besiegers suffered greatly from the shells, for the lines were at short range from the fort. At length Canby determined to make a grand assault by a concentric fire from all his heavy guns, his field-pieces, and the gun-boats, and, if necessary, by the troops. This
t was evidently no longer tenable. Its fire, in response to the continued bombardment, became more and more feeble, and, before midnight, ceased altogether. Other troops pressed into the works, and by a little past two o'clock in the morning, April 9. Bertram's brigade entered it without opposition, and was ordered to garrison it. So ended the siege of Spanish Fort. A greater portion of the garrison had escaped. About six hundred of them were made prisoners; and the spoils of victory were ndrews, of the Thirteenth Corps, formed the center, and Garrard's division of the Sixteenth Corps composed its left. Other divisions of the Sixteenth Corps were near, ready to afford aid to the battle-line, if necessary. It was Sunday, the 9th of April. Half-past 5 o'clock in the afternoon was appointed as the time for the. assault. At that hour dark clouds were rolling up from the west, and the low bellowing of distant thunder was heard. That artillery of heaven was soon made inaudible to
th-work and mounted large guns upon it within two hundred yards of the fort, the latter was completely and closely invested, and its doom was sealed. Yet the garrison fought bravely on, and the besiegers suffered greatly from the shells, for the lines were at short range from the fort. At length Canby determined to make a grand assault by a concentric fire from all his heavy guns, his field-pieces, and the gun-boats, and, if necessary, by the troops. This was begun toward sunset on the 8th of April, and soon afterward, two companies of the Eighth Iowa, Colonel Bell, of Gedde's brigade of Carr's division, were sent as pickets and sharp-shooters, to gain a crest near the fort, intrench, and pick off the Confederate artillerists. This was done gallantly, in the face of a brisk fire, for General Gibson had doubled his line of sharp-shooters. They were Texans, brave and skillful, and stoutly disputed the advance of the Iowa men. But the latter pressed on, gained the prescribed point, b
August, 1864 AD (search for this): chapter 19
us, 519. La Grange's expedition to West Point capture of Fort Tyler, 520. Croxton's destructive raid, 521. the author's journey from Savannah to Montgomery, 522. a day at Montgomery the State capital, 523. at Selma, Mobile, and New Orleans, 524. departure for Port Hudson and Vicksburg, 525. The repossession of Alabama was an important part of General Grant's comprehensive plan of campaign for the winter and spring of 1865. The capture of the forts at the entrance to Mobile Bay Aug., 1864. was a necessary preliminary movement. Had Farragut then known how weakly Mobile was defended, he and Granger might easily have captured it. At that time there were no troops in or immediately about the city. The artillery, also, had been called away to oppose A. J. Smith's troops, then approaching from Memphis (see page 248), and then they were sent to West Point, in Georgia, for the support of General Hood, where they erected a strong work, commanding the railway and the Chattahoche
April 11th (search for this): chapter 19
ted possession of the whole eastern shore of the bay. The army and navy spent all the next day April 10, 1865. in careful reconnoitering, preparing for an advance on Mobile. Some of the gun-boats attempted to go up to Blakely, but were checked by a heavy fire from Forts Huger and Tracy. From these island batteries full two hundred shells were thrown at the navy during that and the next day, when, as we have seen, the garrisons of both spiked their guns, and fled in the shadows of night. April 11. Meanwhile the Thirteenth Army Corps had been taken across the bay, for an attack on Mobile, in connection with the gun-boats, which went from place to place, taking possession of abandoned batteries here and there. But the army found no enemy to fight. On the day after the fall of Blakely, Maury ordered the evacuation of Mobile; and on the 11th, after sinking the powerful rams Huntsville and Tuscaloosa, It is a curious fact that a very large proportion of the most powerful iron-clad v
... 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25