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Fifty Dollars reward. --Ranaway, about the middle of May, 1862, from the subscriber, at that time on a visit to Hanover county, my negro man, named Phil. Phil is about 55 years of age, of medium height, has a scar in his forehead, and has lost several of his front teeth. He is well acquainted in Richmond and vicinity. I think that he has gotten a forged pass and has hired himself out. The above reward will be paid for his apprehension and delivery to me in jail in Richmond. Thos Tinsle. ja 9--2aw6t*
Fifty Dollars reward. --Ranaway about the middle of May, 1862, from the subscriber, at that time on visit to Hanover county, my negro man, named Phil. Phil is about 65 years of age, of medium height, has a scar in his forehead, and has lost several of his front teeth. He is well acquainted Richmond and vicinity. I think that he has gotten a forged pass and has hired himself out. The above reward will be paid for his apprehension and delivery to me in jail in Richmond. Thos. Tinsley. ja 9--2aw6t*
e reverse at Fort Donelson, he conducted the retreat of Johnston's army from Kentucky to Corinth. At the latter point the army was organized into three corps, commanded respectively by Bragg, Polk, and Hardee, and under this organization it entered the bloody battle of Shiloh. Hardee commanded the advance corps, and led in the attack. The country is familiar with the history of that battle, and the distinguished part taken by Gen. Hardee. After the retreat from Corinth, the last of May, 1862, the army halted at Tupelo, Miss., at which point Gen. Beauregard was relieved from command and Gen. Bragg succeeded to it. One of Gen. Bragg's first acts was to make Gen. Hardee the active commander of the Army of the Mississippi; and in this position he continued during the transfer of the army from Tupelo to Chattanooga, and until it was about to move into Kentucky, when it was divided into two wings, one under Polk and the other under Hardee. The battle of Perryville, in October follow
From the latest Northern papers we make up a summary of interesting intelligence: Virginia prisoners in Yankee Bastiles. The following is a list of the civilians from Virginia confined in Yankee prisons who have been denied the right of habeas corpus: Mary Jane Green, Braxton county, destroying telegraph wires, May, 1862; David Angler, Jacob Bolyard, Wm. B. Dougherty, Samuel Elliott, Samuel Holsburg, Peter Johnson, Wm. F. Mitler, and Samuel Halmaker, all of Barbour county, Va., Jan. 8, 1863, arrested by order of Gen. Pierpont as hostages for Sheriff of Barbour county, captured by rebels and taken to Richmond. All these are confined at Wheeling, Va. The following are at Camp Chase, on charge of disloyalty: Martin Brittan, Ell C. Williams, Jackson county; Benj. Bassil, Upsher county; Dallas and Thos, Gilford, Pocahontas county; B. G. Garrier, Dan. Hort, Geo. W. Mills, C. N. Schoonover, Randolph county; Jno. D. Garret, Logan county; Thos. Moran, Barbour county; Jas. W. No
The Daily Dispatch: April 1, 1864., [Electronic resource], The reported occupation of Winchester by the enemy. (search)
Great result in the river.--the steamer West Point in danger. --The river, which had been rising during the preceding twenty-four hours, attained a great height during Wednesday night, and yesterday morning we within a few inches of the high water of May, 1862, and within about three feet of the highest point of the great flood of 1817. Mayor's Island was entirely submerged, only the tops of the houses being visible above the water, as was also a considerable portion of the low grounds of the Falls plantation and three or four hundred yards of Main street in the neighborhood of Gilli's Creek. All the wharves at Rocketts and the new Navy Yard were far under water, and at the latter place great quantities of valuable number was in danger of being washed away. The fine steamer West Point, belonging to the York River Railroad Company, which for two months has been sunk in the river off the foot of the dock, was turned over by the force of the current, and yesterday morning at elev
rin and bear it. The capture of the Florida — She is taken in a neutral port. The capture of the Florida will not cause so much surprise after the following account of it is read.--She was lying in the neutral port of Bahia, Brazil, under the guns of a Brazilian fort; and, under the laws of nations, should have been safe if she had not had a man aboard. The Yankee steamer Wachussett, which captured her, was one of those gunboats which participated in the fight at Drewry's Bluff in May, 1862. She was commanded by Captain Collins. The Florida was a 750-ton steamer (formerly the Orieto), under the command of Lieutenant J. Mannigault Morris, Confederate States Navy. The following is the Yankee account of the capture: The Florida arrived at Bahia, Bay of San Salvador, on the night of the 7th ultimo. Captain Collins having held a consultation with his officers, determined to sink the Florida in port. Accordingly, at about 3 o'clock, the cables were slipped and the Wachusset
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