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uts out of the fire, and at the same time relieve itself of the odium of a prominent participation in the robbery. Spain understands all this as well as it is understood by those behind the curtain in the North. She looked to such a man as John C. Calhoun as the type and representative of Southern sentiment, and it is well known that Mr. Calhoun, like the majority of the Southern people, was opposed to the high-handed robbery which sought to despoil Spain of her Cuban jewel. Besides all thisMr. Calhoun, like the majority of the Southern people, was opposed to the high-handed robbery which sought to despoil Spain of her Cuban jewel. Besides all this, similarity of institutions and character creates sympathies and affinities between Spain and the South, which would readily incline her to prefer a slaveholding, chivalric hospitable people, to the abolition, cold-blooded, cynical, and commercial North. Such menaces as those of the New York press against the whole foreign world, at the very moment that they are thrown into ecstasies at the slightest mark of their favor, going into hysterias over every batch of foreign adventurers that ac
Wm. H. Seward's letter. --The letter of Secretary Seward, which we published on Thursday, in reference to the American correspondence of the London Times, is an amusing production. The Government of the United States must be upon its last legs when the Premier condescend to issue a manifesto upon the communications of an intolerant letter writer of the London Times, concerning matters and thins on this continent. Imagine John C. Calhoun, or Daniel Werster under the old regime, putting forth a manifest from the State Department upon the subject of Russell's letters to the London Times! --Mr. Seward, it is true, affects to treat the matter with great dignity, but it is the dignity of a small man in a great place, of a little fellow attempting to increase his inches by standing as high in his boots as possible.--Moreover, he says, "he has not read the publications complained of," and "am quite sure it has not arrested the attention of any of the members of the Administration," &c
A Son of John C. Calhoun dead. --We clip the following paragraph from the San Francisco Morning. Call, Dec. 21st; Mr. James E Calhoun, a son of the late John C. Calhoun, of South Carolina, died in this city on Friday last of consumption.Calhoun, a son of the late John C. Calhoun, of South Carolina, died in this city on Friday last of consumption. Mr. Calhoun was a lawyer of great ability, an old resident in our midst, and a young man who had endeared himself to a host of friends. He formerly practiced in connexion with Mr. Blanding and Colonel Della Torre, but of late, kept himself retireJohn C. Calhoun, of South Carolina, died in this city on Friday last of consumption. Mr. Calhoun was a lawyer of great ability, an old resident in our midst, and a young man who had endeared himself to a host of friends. He formerly practiced in connexion with Mr. Blanding and Colonel Della Torre, but of late, kept himself retired, awaiting the summons of the stern monster, of whose calling he was assured, but not certain. Mr. Calhoun was a lawyer of great ability, an old resident in our midst, and a young man who had endeared himself to a host of friends. He formerly practiced in connexion with Mr. Blanding and Colonel Della Torre, but of late, kept himself retired, awaiting the summons of the stern monster, of whose calling he was assured, but not certain.
The Daily Dispatch: January 29, 1862., [Electronic resource], The London times and Yankee privateers. (search)
hmond Dispatch.]the Great fire — Calhoun's grave — important movements, &c., &c. Charleston, S. C., Jan. 25, 1862. To a stranger the vast ruins to which a portion of Charleston has been reduced is truly appalling. Such heaps of brick I have never before looked upon. Here and there are a few negroes at work among the ruins clearing away the brick as if looking for some valuable which have been buried beneath the prostrate walls. I have had the privilege of looking upon John C. Calhoun's grave, upon which there was a beautiful bunch of flowers, and was told that every day since the great statesman made that his final resting-place, an old servant has visited his grave, and placed upon it fresh flowers. While that old man's life lasts, the grave of his master shall not want for tender care. Rev. A. H. Tupper, who has been acting as Chaplain at Manassas for seven months, has returned to this city, and is now attending to the spiritual wants of the city hospitals.
of our knowledge this letter has never been published; and as we print it from the graph, we can vouch both for its genuine and correctness. What grander epitaph bed to the memory of the lamented lading than this patriotic blessing to the dy ng Calhoun? What more fearful castigation could be administered to the leader of the Abolition cohorts than this portrait of him by one of the purest and most distinguished men of his own State? The speech of the great South Carolinian which called f. Let me beg you to hear in mind that at your age and mine, nature is not often strong enough to make more than one rally, and that every successive effort is productive not of vigor, but exhaustion. Remember that in all probability the future will require your exertions, as well as the present. I rejoice to hear the favorable opinion of your physicians. Don't trouble yourself to reply. I am, my dear sir, Yours, very truly, J. K. Paulding. Hon. John C. Calhoun, &c., &c., Washington.
the 27th Georgia regiment. Field and Staff.--Killed; Captain Thomas J. Bacon, commissary. Wounded: Col. Levi B. Smith, servers flesh wound in thigh. Four balls penetrated Col Smith's clothes, one his sword scabbard, and two his horse; Lieut Jas Gardner, very slightly, leg. Company A.--Wounded: Corp'l Thomas S Kendrick, hand; Corp'l Thos W. Mitchell fool; privates Robert Flurry, body and cheek; Wm A J Teat, arm; Wiley Williamson, thigh; Net W. Mytic, Geo W. Chapman, slightly; John C. Calhoun do. Company B--Wounded: Captain John W. Stubbs, very slightly by cannon ball; Corp'l Jonathan Willoughby, slightly; privates M C Hennigan, mortally; Wm Wheeler, severely; Wm Parker, do; Isaac Hightower, missing, known to be wounded; J T Avant; slightly. Company C--Killed: J N and G M Williams, (brothers) Wounded: Lieut W W Johnson, slightly in arm; Sergt John Murchison, slightly in arm; Sergt John Murchison sightly in leg; Privates W J Deane, mortally in side; W H McKinney, mo
McClellan's dreams. Before the late battles, some inventive Yankee published a wonderful dream of Gen. McClellan, in which the spirit of George Washington appeared to him, showed him a map of Virginia, and solemnly urged him to put down the rebellion. The Man is evidently taken from the lying dream attributed to John C. Calhoun, in which Washington appeared to the great Carolin and sternly rebuked him for his disunion sentiments. The idea of George Washington, living or dead, holding any converge with an invader of Virginia, and showing him a map of his native State, that McClellan might trace it out in hues of blood, by worthy of a Yankees. Wonder if the map embraced the Chickahominy swamp ! We suspect the only spirit that visits McClellan is one that he is a little too fond of calling from the "vasty deep" of the distilleries; and that, in this condition, he mistakes Old Scott, (who considers himself equal to George Washington.) showing him a map of Virginia, for the Father
Obituary. Died, at the Monument Hotel, in this city, on the 22d inst., in the 27th year of his age, John C. Calhoun, 2d Lieutenant, Co. K, 12th Mississippi volunteers. John C. Calhoun was among the first to volunteer for the defence of Southern rights and Southern; independence. Joining the ranks, he gained the confidence of his officers and fellow soldiers by the cheerful, prompt, and efficient manner in which he discharged his laborious duties. Distinguished in battle for braJohn C. Calhoun was among the first to volunteer for the defence of Southern rights and Southern; independence. Joining the ranks, he gained the confidence of his officers and fellow soldiers by the cheerful, prompt, and efficient manner in which he discharged his laborious duties. Distinguished in battle for brave deeds, and loved in camp his courteous bearing and kindness of heart, when his regiment was reorganized he was chosen 24 Lieutenant of his company. He shared the toils and the dangers of every fight in whish his company took part, He fought gallantly for the defence of Richmond, and in the desperate engagement of Frazer's farm, just as the victory was won, and the foe fled in confusion, he received a severe wound in the right knee. After seven weeks of intense suffering, (ameliorated by e
dained a bishop, took an oath to promote peace and harmony, law and order. I heard him swear the lie myself in Columbus, Ga. Parson Sawris, who knows him well, in some private transactions, says that Early is a miserably corrupt old creature. Let us believe these rebels always when they testify against one another" "When the villainy of these wretches shall be exposed, the revelation will shock the country. These Southern Methodist preachers began the work of disunion years ago. John C. Calhoun, the arch-originator of treason, sent for Bishop Capers, and had a long private conference with him at the time the spilt occurred in our Church. This was the en tering wedge of disunion. I mean to show these traitors to the scorn and abhorrence of their countrymen." Remarks like these, from such a source of course do not injure any person or any society. The above extract, however, shows how vitiated the taste of the North has become. For when "large and crowded audiences" a
n individual, we are inclined to believe, occurred in the case of the late John C. Calhoun.--Adored in his native State, and generally acknowledged everywhere else tf forty years ago, when it meant attachment to the Union,--ever lived than John C. Calhoun. He saw the cloud when it first rose out of the sea, and was no large thaions who still could not, or would not, see the deadly nature of the storm. Mr. Calhoun applied all the energies of his mighty intellect for years to arrest the pros fully developed, as facts, what he foresaw as probabilities years ago. Let Mr. Calhoun's life he read by the light of this war, and it will be acknowledged that thoved those very causes which produced its ruin. Why, indeed, should not Mr. Calhoun have wished to save the Union? He was one of the most distinguished men it hich is more connected in glory and interest with the old Union than that of Mr. Calhoun.--To suppose that he wished to destroy it, is to suppose him guilty of a des
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