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June 26th (search for this): chapter 9
the Confederate attack, might have forced the Southern commander to attack his united army on the right bank. He decided to receive the attack in the position then occupied by Porter, and only withdrew him to the Richmond side of the Chickahominy after he had been badly hammered and had lost some six thousand men. Perhaps if McClellan had known that he was fighting eighty-one thousand men, and not two hundred thousand, he might have acted with more confidence. Mr. Lincoln telegraphed June 26th that his suggestion of, the probability of his being overwhelmed by two hundred thousand men, and talking about where the responsibility would belong, pained him very much. On June 27th McClellan began to realize that he was going to have some very serious work, and begged the Secretary that he would put some one general in command of the Shenandoah Valley and of all troops in front of Washington for the sake of the country. On the same day he complimented Porter for his fine efforts at
June 25th (search for this): chapter 9
im, and, after questioning him, he telegraphed Stanton, There is no doubt that Jackson is coming upon us. At midnight on June 24th he had informed Stanton that a peculiar case of desertion had just occurred from the enemy. The deserter stated that he had left Jackson, Whiting, and Ewell, and fifteen brigades at Gordonsville on the 21st, and that it was intended to attack his [McClellan's] rear on the 28th, and asked for the latest information about Jackson. Mr. Stanton replied to him on June 25th, Jackson then being at Ashland, that he had no definite information as to the number or position of Jackson's forces; that it was reported as numbering forty thousand men. He had also heard that Jackson was at Gordonsville with ten thousand rebels. Other reports placed Jackson at Port Republic, Harrisonburg, and Luray, and that neither McDowell, who was at Manassas, nor Banks and Fremont, who were at Middletown, appear to have any knowledge of Jackson's whereabouts. On the day Jackson ar
August 17th, 1862 AD (search for this): chapter 9
, to hold on there, and fight like the devil. Lee therefore found Pope on the Rappahannock, with his right at the Waterloo Bridge and his left at Kelly's Ford. He had stretched down the river as far as he well could so as to keep his communication open with Fredericksburg, from which point Burnside and Fitz John Porter's corps of the Army of the Potomac were coming. Lee was anxious to get at Pope at once, but there was a river rolling between them. From Camp near Orange Court House, August 17, 1862, he wrote: Here I am in a tent instead of my comfortable quarters at Dobbs's (his headquarters in front of Richmond). The tent, however, is very comfortable, and of that I have nothing to complain. General Pope says he is very strong, and seems to feel so, for he is moving apparently up to the Rapidan. I hope he will not prove stronger than we are. I learn since I have left that General McClellan has moved down the James River with his whole army. I suppose he is coming here, too, s
June 27th (search for this): chapter 9
d only withdrew him to the Richmond side of the Chickahominy after he had been badly hammered and had lost some six thousand men. Perhaps if McClellan had known that he was fighting eighty-one thousand men, and not two hundred thousand, he might have acted with more confidence. Mr. Lincoln telegraphed June 26th that his suggestion of, the probability of his being overwhelmed by two hundred thousand men, and talking about where the responsibility would belong, pained him very much. On June 27th McClellan began to realize that he was going to have some very serious work, and begged the Secretary that he would put some one general in command of the Shenandoah Valley and of all troops in front of Washington for the sake of the country. On the same day he complimented Porter for his fine efforts at Gaines Mill, says he looks upon the day as decisive of the war, and tells him to try and drive the rascals, and take some prisoners and guns. This was an hour or two before Porter's defe
June 22nd (search for this): chapter 9
the 21st. Jackson, leaving his army to follow, took an express car accompanied only by his chief of staff, who, strange to say, was not a military man, but a Presbyterian minister and a professor in a theological seminary. When Sunday morning, June 22d, dawned, Jackson, with his ministerial aid, had reached Frederickshall, a point on the Central Railroad, now called the Chesapeake and Ohio, some fifty-two miles from Richmond. Being the Sabbath, and against his religious convictions to travel . The total losses to the Army of the Potomac in these seven days of conflict are put down at fifteen thousand eight hundred and forty-nine, and the list of casualties in the Army of Northern Virginia in the fights before Richmond, commencing June 22d and ending July 1, 1862, is placed at sixteen thousand seven hundred and eighty-two. The Southern losses were the greater because during the battles they invariably formed the attacking column, while the Federal troops fought more or less behin
June 24th (search for this): chapter 9
, on the morning of the 26th, at three o'clock, he informed Mr. Stanton that his impression was confirmed that Jackson would soon attack our right rear, and added if he had another good division he would laugh at Jackson. At 9 A. M. on the morning of the 26th a negro servant who had been in the employ of some of the officers of the Twentieth Georgia was brought before him, and, after questioning him, he telegraphed Stanton, There is no doubt that Jackson is coming upon us. At midnight on June 24th he had informed Stanton that a peculiar case of desertion had just occurred from the enemy. The deserter stated that he had left Jackson, Whiting, and Ewell, and fifteen brigades at Gordonsville on the 21st, and that it was intended to attack his [McClellan's] rear on the 28th, and asked for the latest information about Jackson. Mr. Stanton replied to him on June 25th, Jackson then being at Ashland, that he had no definite information as to the number or position of Jackson's forces; tha
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