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Browsing named entities in a specific section of Benson J. Lossing, Pictorial Field Book of the Civil War. Volume 2.. Search the whole document.

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July 22nd, 1866 AD (search for this): chapter 9
eight hundred regiments and batteries, which extended over the seaboard to New Orleans, and the entire Shenandoah Valley, had the mail matter for them thus prepared for distribution. After being thus sorted, these mails were delivered to authorized military agents, who attended to their transmission. In this way hundreds of thousands of letters passed to and from the army daily. For months, says Mr. S. J. Bowen, the postmaster of Washington City, in a letter to the author, on the 22d of July, 1866, we received and sent an average of 250,000 military letters per day. It is believed that this number was exceeded after General Sherman's army reached Savannah, and up to the time of the review of the troops in this city in the month of May, 1865. Taking into consideration, continues Mr. Bowen, the quantity of mail matter, consisting of letters, newspapers, packages of clothing, and other articles of every conceivable kind that passed through this office to and from our armies
March 17th, 1862 AD (search for this): chapter 9
ro, General Grant's late post, in honor of the glorious achievement. The women of St. Louis, desirous of testifying their admiration of General Halleck, in whose Department and by whose troops these victories had been achieved (and because of his energy in suppressing secession in Missouri), ordered an elegant sword to be made by Tiffany & Co., of New York, to be presented to him in their name. This was done in the parlor of the Planters' Hotel, in St. Louis, on the evening of the 17th of March, 1862, by Mrs. Helen Budd, who spoke in behalf of the donors. In his brief reply, General Halleck assured the women of St. Louis that it should be used in defense of their happiness, their rights, and their honor, and solely in behalf of justice. The weapon was an elegant one, richly ornamented with classical designs. Halleck's sword. spreading with speed of lightning over the land, produced intense joy in every loyal bosom. Cities were illuminated, heavy guns thundered forth National
May, 1865 AD (search for this): chapter 9
, 1866, we received and sent an average of 250,000 military letters per day. It is believed that this number was exceeded after General Sherman's army reached Savannah, and up to the time of the review of the troops in this city in the month of May, 1865. Taking into consideration, continues Mr. Bowen, the quantity of mail matter, consisting of letters, newspapers, packages of clothing, and other articles of every conceivable kind that passed through this office to and from our armies,gh the Carolinas, and after the hard-fought battle of Bentonville, he met the mail for his army on the evening of the day of that battle. Letter to the author by General Markland, August 20, 1866. In a letter to Colonel Markland, written in May, 1865, General O. O. Howard says: For more than a year the Army of the Tennessee has been campaigning in the interior of the Southern States, a great portion of the time far separated from depots of supplies, and connected with home and friends only
March 21st, 1862 AD (search for this): chapter 9
nder the supervision and control of Mr. Davis himself, may safely be charged the calamitous occurrences at Forts Donelson and Henry, and at Roanoke Island. --War of the Rebellion, by Henry S. Foote. Generals Grant, McClernand, and Wallace For their services in the siege of Fort Donelson. Generals Grant, McClernand, and Wallace were each promoted to Major-General of volunteers, the commission of the former bearing the date of the surrender (February 16, 1862), and the other two of March 21st, 1862. issued orders congratulating their victorious troops ; Grant said (February 17th), after congratulating his troops on their triumph over the rebellion, gained by their valor, that for four successive nights, without shelter during the most inclement weather known in this latitude, they faced an enemy in large force in a position chosen by himself. Though strongly fortified by nature, all the additional safeguards suggested by science were added. Without a murmur this was borne, pr
March 18th, 1862 AD (search for this): chapter 9
. Johnston clearly perceived the importance of the post, and when it was threatened by the attack on Fort Henry, which was only twelve miles distant, he gave it all the re-enforcements in his power. I determined, he said, to fight for Nashville at Donelson, and have the best part of my army to do it, and so he sent sixteen thousand troops there, retaining only fourteen thousand men to cover his front at Bowling Green. Letter of General Johnston to Congressman Barksdale, at Richmond, March 18, 1862. It is difficult to conceive how a veteran soldier like Johnston could have intrusted a business so important as the command of so large a force, on so momentous an occasion, to such weak men as Gideon J. Pillow and John B. Floyd, who were successively placed in chief command of Fort Donelson, at that time. But so it was. Pillow had arrived there on the 10th of the month, Feb., 1862. and with the aid of Major Gilmer, General Johnston's chief engineer, had worked diligently in stren
July 30th, 1866 AD (search for this): chapter 9
redit of making it practically effective in blessing the officers and soldiers of the armies of the Republic during the great struggle. The perfection of the system was exhibited even so early as at the capture of Forts Henry and Donelson, and it never failed to give ample satisfaction to all, until the end of the war. The origin and general efficiency of that service is stated in the following letter to the author, dated, Headquarters Armies of the United States, Washington, D. C., July 30th, 1866: -- Dear Sir :--Among the subjects that occupied my mind when I assumed command at Cairo, in the fall of 1861, was the regular supply of mails to and from the troops; not only those in garrison, but those on the march when active movements should begin. When I commenced the movement on Fort Henry, on Jan. T, 1862, a plan was proposed by which the mails should promptly follow, and as promptly be sent from the army. So perfect was the organization, that the mails were delivered t
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