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Browsing named entities in a specific section of Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 10. (ed. Frank Moore). Search the whole document.

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July 9th, 1863 AD (search for this): chapter 47
y. The loss of the detachment was two killed, six wounded, and thirty missing. The regiment entered the fight with an aggregate of four hundred and thirty-two; the entire loss was two hundred and seventeen. I respectfully submit the above as my report of the part taken by Bell's regiment in the engagement of the fourth instant at Helena. T. H. Blacknall, Major, commanding Bell's Regiment. Report of Colonel Hawthorne. headquarters Hawthorne's regiment, camp near Bayou Deview, July 9, 1863. Captain W. C. thomas, A. A. General: Sir: In obedience to orders from brigade headquarters, I have the honor to submit the following report of the part my regiment took in the action at Helena, on the fourth instant: At eleven o'clock P. M., on the night of the third, we left our encampment, six miles from Helena, and marched to take up our positions in front of the intrenchments, my regiment being in the advance. The road over which we passed (known as the Hill road, from Littl
r obstacles, and to reach, on the morning of the third instant, a point within five miles of Helena. At this difficult. At twelve o'clock on the night of the third, the division was put in motion, my brigade in advanthe town of Helena, on the fourth instant: On the third orders were issued from district headquarters for Gepon the fourth instant: On the evening of the third instant, at dark, I ordered Colonel Brooks, with his rega, on the fourth instant: On the night of the third instant I took up the line of march at eleven o'clock, tt of the fourth instant at Helena: At dusk on the third, in compliance with instructions from Brigadier-Geneant: At eleven o'clock P. M., on the night of the third, we left our encampment, six miles from Helena, and nt and battery of four pieces, on the evening of the third, from the Bowie Farm, on the Little Rock road, four halted there about twelve o'clock P. M., on the third instant. About an hour before day on the morning of the
sion in the attack made upon Helena on the fourth instant: I left Jacksonport, in obedience to himy brigade in the battle of Helena, on the fourth instant: On the evening of the third of July thn the late battle fought at Helena, on the fourth instant: On the night of the third instant I token by my command in the engagement of the fourth instant at Helena: At dusk on the third, in comlf-past 1 o'clock A. M., on the morning of the fourth, I received orders from Brigadier-General Fagay Bell's regiment in the engagement of the fourth instant at Helena. We moved for half a mile at doiment took in the action at Helena, on the fourth instant: At eleven o'clock P. M., on the night ort of the movements of my regiment on the fourth instant: According to your order, I moved my remy regiment in the attack on Helena on the fourth instant: I reached Mrs. Moonley's and halted thAbout an hour before day on the morning of the fourth, in obedience to an order from the Brigadier-G[5 more...]
June 14th, 1863 AD (search for this): chapter 47
ion of the State caused by their presence, it was deemed of very great importance that they should be driven from their only stronghold in Arkansas. As a means of raising the siege of Vicksburg, and of keeping the Mississippi river closed, in the event of a surrender of that city, the policy of the move was perfectly apparent. Moreover, from information, considered reliable, in my possession, the capture of Helena by the forces at my disposal seemed perfectly practicable. On the fourteenth June, 1863, I telegraphed to Lieutenant-General Smith, that I believed I could take the place, and asked his permission to attack it. Two days after I started to Jacksonport, there to consult with Generals Price and Maxmaduke, and to make the necessary preliminary arrangements. The result of this interview was the following orders: Price's command, consisting of General McRae's Arkansas and General Parsons' Missouri brigades of infantry, constituting Price's division, and Colonels Green's an
July 14th, 1863 AD (search for this): chapter 47
urgeon Bear, with the regimental surgeons and their assistants, were on the field, and, by their prompt professional attention to the wounded, saved many valuable lives. A report in detail of the killed, wounded and missing, will be forwarded at an early day to the proper department. I have the honor to be, Very respectfully, M. M. Parsons, Brigadier-General, commanding. Official: Thomas L. Snead, Major and A. A. G. Report of General McRae. headquarters McRae's brigade, July 14, 1863. Major Thomas L. Snead, Assistant Adjutant-General, Price's Division: Major: I submit the following report of the action of my brigade in the assault upon the town of Helena, on the fourth instant: On the third orders were issued from district headquarters for General Parsons' and my brigade to assault and take the fort upon Graveyard Hill at daylight upon the morning of the fourth. By agreement, General Parsons' brigade was to move in front until he got into position, so as to en
July 13th, 1863 AD (search for this): chapter 47
which should have succeeded, I refrain from all expressions of commendation, believing that the brave officers and men who distinguished themselves will willingly forego the applause due to them, in consideration that our beloved country reaped no benefit from their exploits. I have the honor to be, General, Very respectfully, Your obedient servant, Thomas H. Holmes, Lieutenant-General. Report of Major-General Price. headquarters Price's division, camp on Jones' Lake, July 13, 1863. Captain John W. Hinsdale, A. A. G.: Captain: I have the honor to submit to the Lieutenant-General commanding, the following report of the part taken by this division in the attack made upon Helena on the fourth instant: I left Jacksonport, in obedience to his orders, on the twenty-second day of June, with this division and Marmaduke's division of cavalry. My march was greatly impeded by the extraordinary rains, which, beginning on the evening of the twenty-fourth June, and fallin
of infantry, constituting Price's division, and Colonels Green's and Shelby's brigades of Missouri cavalry, Marmaduke's division to rendezvous at Cotton Plant, and Brigadier-General Fagan's Arkansas brigade of infantry, at Clarendon, on the twenty-sixth June (Friday), whence, by converging roads, the two columns would move in the direction of Helena. I also informed General Walker, commanding brigade of cavalry in the vicinity of Helena, of my intention, and directed him to allow no ingress to the place. Upon my return to Little Rock, I found that General Smith had fully sanctioned my proposed attack, and that the Secretary of War had written a strong letter, suggesting, advising, and urging it. Thus encouraged, on the twenty-sixth of June, I proceeded to Clarendon, and assumed command of the expedition. From unavoidable necessity, consequent upon rain, high water, and wretched roads, General Price's command did not reach its rendezvous for four days after the day fixed, thus giv
July 4th, 1863 AD (search for this): chapter 47
Doc. 47: the battle of Helena. Report of Lieutenant-General Holmes. little Rock, August 14, 1863. Brigadier-General W. R. Boggs, Chief of Staff, Department Trans-Mississippi, Shreveport, Louisiana: General: I have the honor to submit to the Lieutenant-General commanding the following report of the attack made by me upon Helena, on the fourth of July, 1863: In the month of June, 1862, the Federal forces under General Curtis, from the attempted invasion of Arkansas betook themselves to the city of Helena, and there fortified. Since that time it has been constantly and heavily garrisoned by Federal troops. The possession of this place has been of immense advantage to the enemy. From it, they have threatened at all times an invasion of Arkansas, thereby rendering it necessary that troops should be held in position to repel such invasion. From it they have controlled the trade and sentiments of a large and important scope of country. It has been to them a most importan
e, General, Very respectfully, Your obedient servant, Thomas H. Holmes, Lieutenant-General. Report of Major-General Price. headquarters Price's division, camp on Jones' Lake, July 13, 1863. Captain John W. Hinsdale, A. A. G.: Captain: I have the honor to submit to the Lieutenant-General commanding, the following report of the part taken by this division in the attack made upon Helena on the fourth instant: I left Jacksonport, in obedience to his orders, on the twenty-second day of June, with this division and Marmaduke's division of cavalry. My march was greatly impeded by the extraordinary rains, which, beginning on the evening of the twenty-fourth June, and falling almost without intermission for four days, made the rivers, bayous, and creeks, over which my route lay, and the bottoms and swamps through which it ran, almost impassable to troops, unprovided, as mine were, with the means of repairing roads and constructing bridges or rafts. I was, however, enabl
July 5th, 1863 AD (search for this): chapter 47
and retired. I must speak in the highest terms of the officers and men of my command upon the occasion — no straggling in reaching the place assigned them, although accompanied by apparent insurmountable difficulties, resisted successfully the enemy, and twice drove him away handsomely. I send herewith reports of Colonels Dobbins and Newton. I am, Major, very respectfully, Your obedient servant, L. M. Walker, Brigadier-General. Report of Colonel Dobbins. in the field, July 5, 1863. Brigadier-General Walker: General: I respectfully submit the following report of the movements of my regiment on the fourth instant: According to your order, I moved my regiment and battery of four pieces, on the evening of the third, from the Bowie Farm, on the Little Rock road, four miles west of Helena, to the old Porter Farm, east .of Crawley's Bridge, on the road leading from Helena to Sterling, a distance of about fifteen miles, and remained at that place until two o'clock o
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