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Browsing named entities in a specific section of Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 17. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones). Search the whole document.

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Lincoln's proclamation. There remains but one other fact to be stated in order that you may understand the effect produced upon the people of the border States by Mr. Lincoln's proclamation. Those States cast at the presidential election of 1860, 867,675 votes, as against 478,685 cast by the cotton States, and of those 867,675 votes, an overwhelming majority was opposed to secession and in favor of the maintenance of the Union. But firmly as this great body of citizens adhered to the Uni either through the judicial department or any other department, to use any coercive means to compel him, and upon this ground the motion for the mandamus must be overruled. This decision was rendered by the Supreme Court at its December term, 1860, after the election of Mr. Lincoln. You will observe that the proclamation sought to avoid the law as established by the Supreme Court, by affecting to treat the secession of the States as an act of insurrection on the part of their people. But
o fight and a glory to die. To-day. We are here to-day to honor ourselves by doing honor to the memory of the foremost champion of that cause. If we look for a moment at the result of the method of composing the troubles of the country in 1861, adopted by Mr. Lincoln, I do not think that much encouragement will be found to resort to it again. It is true that it abolished slavery and removed the only serious cause of dissension between the people of the North and South, but as I have Union by means of justice, good-will, conciliation, and fraternal kindness, and they have done their work well. But the great mass of the Southern people believed, and still believe, that the same agencies would have done the same blessed work in 1861, before a dark river of blood and tears was made to flow between the people of the North and South. Richmond. It is impossible for me to speak of the military history of General Lee, or even refer to it, except in the most general way. Ri
negroes free. For the proclamation came at a time when the Federal army that had besieged Richmond in the beginning of 1862 had barely saved Washington from the grasp of the half-starved, half-naked soldiers of the Confederacy. It was issued whe left undetermined on the bloody field of Sharpsburg. It came at a time when the Federal plan of campaign in Virginia for 1862 had failed, shattered at Manassas, shattered at Sharpsburg, and if there be not about it a painful suggestion of servile wd to the use of adjectives in the description of what was admirable in itself. I had occasion, early in the campaign of 1862, to write an account of a brilliant performance of some of his troops, and having been an eye-witness, and being new to suin a most interesting letter, gave me the following illustration of the destitution of the Confederacy in the beginning of 1862. Mr. Benjamin was Secretary of War at the time of the loss of Roanoke Island. The report of the officer in command o
February 9th, 1861 AD (search for this): chapter 1.12
ave States on Federal subjects connected with slavery, were responsible for the laws of the country as they stood when Mr. Lincoln was inaugurated on the 4th of March, 1861. But that there was nothing in Federal legislation obnoxious to the cotton States themselves at the time the Confederate Government was organized at Montgomery, is shown by the very first act of the Provisional Congress. Statute 1, chapter 1 of the Provisional Congress of the Confederate States, adopted on the 9th of February, 1861, is as follows: An act to continue in force certain laws of the United States of America. Be it enacted by the Confederate States of America in Congress assembled, That all the laws of the United States of America in force and in use in the Confederate States of America on the first day of November last, and not inconsistent with the Constitution of the Confederate States, be and the same are hereby continued in force until altered or repealed by the Congress. Adopted F
ow that it did not make war to emancipate the slaves, but that it liberated the slaves to help it to make war. President Lincoln's proclamation of September 22, 1862, declares: That on the first day of January, in the year of our Lord one thousand eight hundred and sixty-three, all persons held as slaves in any State, or designated part of a State, the people whereof shall then be in rebellion against the United States, shall be then, thenceforward, and forever free; and the Executive Govembition as in war for the defense of the country. Napoleon was the idol of his soldiers. Lee was the idol of his men. I will relate an incident to show how the men regarded General Lee. While the army was on the Rapidan, in the winter of 1863-‘64, it became necessary, as was often the case, to put the men upon very short rations. Their duty was hard, not only on the outposts during the winter, but in the construction of roads to facilitate communication between the different parts of
February 8th, 1861 AD (search for this): chapter 1.12
860, indicating that the people were nearly divided. The convention assembled on the 4th of March following, and on the 18th rejected an ordinance of secession by a vote of 35 to 39 against it. In North Carolina the Legislature passed a bill, on the 30th of January, 1861, to submit to a popular vote the question of calling a convention. The vote was taken on the 28th of February, 1861, and resulted in 46,671 for and 47,333 against holding a convention. In Tennessee, on the 8th of February, 1861, the people voted against calling a convention, 67,360 against and 54,156 for the measure, the total vote being nearly 24,000 less than that cast at the presidential election in November, 1860. In Virginia a convention assembled on the 13th of February, 1861, and devoted itself mainly to effect a peaceful adjustment of the troubles of the country and prevent the permanent disruption of the Union. The records of the convention abound with evidence of the devotion of the great body
March 13th, 1889 AD (search for this): chapter 1.12
desire of the association to have the statue of Lee as large as the equestrian statue of Washington, to forward to him the drawing and the measurements of the same made by Engineer Burgwyn, and to ascertain the additional cost. After correspondence, it was agreed that the height of the statue, including the bronze plate, should be six and one-half metres (about twenty-one feet), and the price of the same increased to 90,000 francs, instead of the original price of 60,000 francs. On March 13th, 1889, on the motion of General Lee, and by a unanimous vote of the board, Colonel Archer Anderson was invited to deliver the address at the unveiling of the Lee Monument. Laying of the Corner-stone. The corner-stone of the Lee Monument was laid October 27th, 1887. Notwithstanding that the day was most disagreeably wet, being a continuation of a three days rain, the procession was imposing. The military from different portions of the State participated, whilst four hundred and fifty
June 18th, 1887 AD (search for this): chapter 1.12
a few thousand dollars, this noble monument of General Lee will not be left in an unfinished state, as it must be while it lacks the two groups of sculpture which formed a part of the original design. Discussing the site. Libby Hill, Gamble's Hill, and the Allen lot, in the western part of the city, were successively discussed and voted on as the site of the statue. The Allen lot was at last chosen and accepted as the gift of Mr. Otway S. Allen, by the following resolution: June 18th, 1887. Resolved, That in view of the original advantages of the location, the donation of Mr. Otway S. Allen, heirs and devisees, of the circle of 100 feet, radius as the monument site, and especially in consideration of the surroundings proposed by them and submitted to us in the plan and survey of Colonel C. P. E. Burgwyn, including the broad intersecting avenues and open area or place about the monument circle, which dedication and survey are to be parts of the deed and recorded therewith,
February 13th, 1861 AD (search for this): chapter 1.12
f January, 1861, to submit to a popular vote the question of calling a convention. The vote was taken on the 28th of February, 1861, and resulted in 46,671 for and 47,333 against holding a convention. In Tennessee, on the 8th of February, 1861, the people voted against calling a convention, 67,360 against and 54,156 for the measure, the total vote being nearly 24,000 less than that cast at the presidential election in November, 1860. In Virginia a convention assembled on the 13th of February, 1861, and devoted itself mainly to effect a peaceful adjustment of the troubles of the country and prevent the permanent disruption of the Union. The records of the convention abound with evidence of the devotion of the great body of its members to the Union, and of their earnest efforts to avert a resort to force as a means of preserving it. As late as April 4, 1861, the convention refused to submit an ordinance of secession to the people for their approval by a vote of 45 for to 80 aga
for so many years caused a contest in this State against the Federal Government. Not one word is said about the violations of the Constitution in expenditures not authorized by that instrument, but the main stress is laid upon an incomparably unimportant point relative to fugitive slaves and the laws passed by Northern States obstructing the recovery of fugitive slaves * * * * Many of the acts of the non-slave-holding States obstructing the recovery of fugitive slaves have been passed since 1852, I think the majority of them, but I do not regard it as a matter of any importance. In reply to General Gregg, Mr. Keitt made a statement which illustrates what I have said with reference to the Southern representatives in Congress being responsible for the Federal laws as they stood at the time the cotton States seceded. He said: We have instructed the committee to draw up a statement of the reasons which influenced us in the present case in our withdrawal. My friend suggests th
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