hide Matching Documents

The documents where this entity occurs most often are shown below. Click on a document to open it.

Document Max. Freq Min. Freq
View all matching documents...

Your search returned 432 results in 250 document sections:

... 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25
to answer the charge of being women of evil name and reputation, and occupying a private box on the floor of the dress circle in the Marshall Theatre, in a place set apart for respectable people.--The females are of the flash order, and well known about the city. It appears that on Friday night some person having a knowledge of their personal appearance identified them in one of the private boards. and informed the city police. The latter repacked to the private box and hutted his suspicion, when the inmates and a man who accompanied them declared they were respectable ladies resident of Culpeper county in the city on a visit. Other evidence being brought forward, the true character of the parties was established, and they were taken off to the upper station-house for the night. The Mayor required the escort to give $200 security to be of good behavior on the charge of associating with the above parties. The latter were required to give the same surety for their good behavior.
The Daily Dispatch: May 7, 1863., [Electronic resource], The Alexandria--Yankee foreign Enlistments. (search)
and Giles for the plaintiffs. Judgment of the Circuit Court of the city of Richmond affirmed. Hill's executors vs. Simms ets's. Argued by A. A. Morson for the appellant, and Wm. Green for the appellees. Decree of the Circuit Court of Culpeper county affirmed. Hill's executor vs. Flint and others. Argued by Arthur A. Morson for the appellants, and Wm. Green for the appellees. Decrees of the Circuit Court of Culpeper county affirmed. N. H Massie, administrator of Andrew Stevent of Culpeper county affirmed. N. H Massie, administrator of Andrew Stevenson, dec'd, vs. Tolsr and others. Argued by N. H. Massie, J. A. Jones, and James Lyons for the appellants, and Daniel, Howard, and Sands for the appellees. Decree of the Circuit Court of Hanover county reversed. Fisher and others vs. Conoley's administrator and others. Argued by Agues and Randolph for the appellants, and A. R. Holliday for the appellees. Decree of Circuit Court of Fluvanna county affirmed.
Fighting in Culpeper. Passengers by the Central train last evening report having heard heavy cannonading in Culpeper county yesterday morning, about 11 o'clock. As the train was on its way down no particulars of the fight were ascertained.
The Daily Dispatch: June 11, 1863., [Electronic resource], The cavalry fight in Culpeper — further particulars. (search)
The cavalry fight in Culpeper — further particulars. The fight which took place in Culpeper county, on Tuesday, was upon a much more extended scale than the first reports received seemed to indicate. According to the telegram of Gen. Lee to Gen. Cooper, it commenced at 5 o'clock in the morning and lasted till 5 in the afternoon. The reports brought to the city by passengers on the Central train yesterday evening, are more than usually conflicting, and it is exceedingly difficult from them to arrive at anything approaching accuracy, as to the attack of the enemy, the loss sustained on either side, or the locality and duration of the fight. All seemed to concur in the opinion, however, that our forces were surprised, and did not know of the presence of the enemy until reports of his artillery were heard. This would hardly seem probable, but there is a singular concurrence of testimony to that effect. As well as we can judge from these confused reports, the fight occurred o
The fight in Culpeper county. The reports of the late fight in Culpeper county, brought down by passengers on the Central train yesterday evening, are hardly more satisfactory than those which had previously reached us. That our forces were surprised there seems no longer any reason to doubt, and that they fought gallantly after they recovered from the confusion into which they were at first thrown is also certain. It is equally certain that the battle terminated with the repulse of the eCulpeper county, brought down by passengers on the Central train yesterday evening, are hardly more satisfactory than those which had previously reached us. That our forces were surprised there seems no longer any reason to doubt, and that they fought gallantly after they recovered from the confusion into which they were at first thrown is also certain. It is equally certain that the battle terminated with the repulse of the enemy and the advantage on our side, the enemy's loss in killed and wounded, and in the number of prisoners captured, being considerably greater than that sustained by our forces. The greater portion of our wounded have been sent back to Gordonsville, where about 125 had been received up to 12 o'clock yesterday. The whole number of wounded in the engagement, it is believed, will amount to from 150 to 200. The number of killed it is thought will not exceed 50. The number of officers slain i
The fight at Brandy Station. The particulars which reach us of the affair of Tuesday last, in Culpeper county, tend to confirm the first reports received. As has already been stated, the passage of the Rappahannock was effected by the enemy at fords not picketed by our troops, and consequently without interference or interruption. Before our pickets could communicate with the camps, to enable our troops to prepare for an attack, the force of the enemy, largely superior in number, was precipitated upon them, and it was only by severe and hard fighting that victory was wrested from the bold and determined foe. Our gunners at the first battery charged by the enemy had no time allowed them to use their pieces, but, manfully standing by their guns, they fought the enemy with their rammers, and in this way succeeded in unhorsing several of the Yankee cavalry.--They were finally overpowered and forced to leave their pieces, or were cut down or captured in their defence. This was earl
Two hundred dollars reward. --Offered for the apprehension and delivery to me at Richmond of a negro girl named Kitty, formerly owned by Mr. Chas Short, Sheriff of Culpeper county, where she was raised and is supposed to be gone. Description: Kitty is about 18 years old, dark complexion, pretty stout built, thick-lipped, downcast countenance, and is a good cook, washer, and ironer. She ran off on the 2d inst and has been heard to say she wanted to go back where she was raised, in Culpeper. R P Blount, Corner 5th and Marchall sts. je 18--6t *
The Daily Dispatch: July 15, 1862., [Electronic resource], The report of Yankees at Gordonsville. (search)
d of Gordonsville on the line of the Central Railroad. part the early part of the day yesterday it was absented with apparent confidence, that three hundred of the enemy's cavalry had visited that town and after dashing through the place, and capturing the telegraph operator, had retired. It was then reported that six thousand of the enemy was at Orange Court House, a few miles below Gordonsville and that the greater part, if not the army of the Valley of Virginia, under Pope were in Culpeper county. We have endeavored is ascertain by cautious inquiry the facts in con with the appearance of the Yankee forces is that quarter and are satisfied that the statements alluded to are essentially incorrect. On Sunday a body of Yankees appeared at the river on the northern edge of Orange county and destroyed the railroad bridge over that but if our information is correct, they never visited Gordonsville at all, and retired after committing the damage stated. It is probable that the
ommandant of the brigade not to make an attack until the corps came up. Whilst waiting for our forces to arrive the enemy sallied forth and attacked the brigade, and forced it to retire. Our men fought with spirit, and inflicted heavy loss on the enemy. Our loss was about 200 killed, wounded, and missing. Col. Walker, of the 3d Ga. regiment, who was wounded in the fight, arrived in this city yesterday afternoon. Our advices from the Valley state that the enemy, in small force, occupied Winchester on Sunday morning. Their force there is represented to be entirely of cavalry. On Monday a party of Federal cavalry came to Hartford Church, in Stafford county, about five miles from Fredericksburg, on a reconnaissance. Their main body was in the county, and a portion of it was near the Culpeper county line, somewhere in the vicinity of Raccoon Ford. The main body of this party is supposed to be Sedgwick's corps. Our informant states that Stafford county is "full of Yankees."
The Daily Dispatch: August 3, 1863., [Electronic resource], From Gen. Lee's army — fight in Culpeper county. (search)
From Gen. Lee's army — fight in Culpeper county. Information received from Culpeper county by the train last evening furnishes us an account of a pretty severe cavalry fight in Culpeper county, in the immediate neighborhood of the old battle-field of Brandy Station, on Saturday last. We could only obtain confused reportsCulpeper county by the train last evening furnishes us an account of a pretty severe cavalry fight in Culpeper county, in the immediate neighborhood of the old battle-field of Brandy Station, on Saturday last. We could only obtain confused reports of this fight, but from these we gather that the enemy, in a force consisting of some three brigades of cavalry, advanced on our line of pickets in the early part of the day. The picket force was composed of the 12th Virginia regiment, Gen. Mahone's brigade. This force resisted the enemy until Hampton's cavalry came up, when the Culpeper county, in the immediate neighborhood of the old battle-field of Brandy Station, on Saturday last. We could only obtain confused reports of this fight, but from these we gather that the enemy, in a force consisting of some three brigades of cavalry, advanced on our line of pickets in the early part of the day. The picket force was composed of the 12th Virginia regiment, Gen. Mahone's brigade. This force resisted the enemy until Hampton's cavalry came up, when the battle was joined between our cavalry and that of the enemy. During some portions of the engagement the fighting is represented to have been very severe. In the early part of the fight Capt. E. W. Branch, commanding the Grays, from this city, was killed, and his body brought to the city by the Central train last evening. Ham
... 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25