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Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 24. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), chapter 1.3 (search)
till present an unbroken front to the invading foe, and declared, we still will meet the foe upon the threshold of our State with fire and sword, nerved by the unanswering and unalterable determination never to yield. To the same effect were the resolutions passed in mass-meeting by Harrison's brigade. On May 17th was published the following order of Major T. M. Harwood, commanding the cavalry battalion, Waul's Legion: Members of this command will rendezvous at Brenham, Washington county, May 28th, prepared to march immediately to brigade headquarters east of the Mississippi river. About that date General Majors addressed his brigade, exhorting them to stand by the flag. Such were the spontaneous expressions of the commanders, the army and the citizens when the first authentic news of Lee's surrender reached Texas, and before they realized that other and final disasters could occur in such quick succession. There were no telegraphs beyond the State lines; only one railroad, the Ho
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 25. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), The career of Wise's Brigade, 1861-5. (search)
e Beauregard, when they were halted by General Whiting and ordered to fall back. But for this sad hindrance, the causes of which were fully reported, the victory of Beauregard would have been one of the most signal and decisive during the war. As it was, it was very decided in capturing 6,000 prisoners and in shutting Butler up, as General Grant said, in Howlett's Neck, like a fly in a bottle. On the morning of the 17th the two brigades joined Beauregard's army, and from the 18th to the 28th of May, for ten days, there was heavy fighting on the whole picket lines, one-third of our brigade being required at a time to picket its front, making every day almost a general battle. At last the order came to charge and take the enemy's outer line at Howlett's, and it was captured from Ware Bottom Church on the James to the front of Cobb's on the Appomattox. The part borne by Martin's and Wise's Brigades upon the enemy in their front was without failure and a perfect success; 600 of the Wi
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 26. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), War Diary of Capt. Robert Emory Park, Twelfth Alabama Regiment. January 28th, 1863January 27th, 1864. (search)
t night. May 24. A warm Sabbath. Heard Rev. Dr. Moses D. Hoge preach a fine sermon at Camp Alabama. Lieutenant Wright came, and reported the loss of a pair of new boots sent me and a number of new novels. I am nearly barefooted and wanted something to read, so my regret may be imagined. May 25. Learned of death of private Joe Black from his wounds. May 26 and 27. Lieutenant-Colonel J. C. Goodgame returned to us, and was well received. Inspection of arms by ordnance officer. May 28. Lieutenant Wright sent in his resignation, approved by Dr. J. B. Kelly, assistant-surgeon. May 29. Grand review of Rodes' division by Generals R. E. Lee, A. P. Hill and R. E. Rodes. The day was warm, and we marched three miles to the reviewing grounds and stood several hours before getting properly aligned. After Preparing for Review and Passing in Review before General Rodes, General Lee arrived and we went through the same maneuvers before him. I commanded the fourth division of t
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 27. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Colonel John Bowie Magruder. (search)
iate such a kindness. Besides, Mr. Tyler had every man's haversack filled with deliciously cooked corn bread, which must have required fully six bushels of meal. The camp for the night of the 13th was in a woods near Mr. Urquhart's farm, and about 11 o'clock A. M. of the 14th of May, the command arrived at Littletown where it rejoined the brigade which came up from Suffolk, and all moved to a point about two and a half miles north and east of Petersburg, where they encamped. On the 28th of May, Armistead's brigade was engaged in obstructing the Appomattox river at Point of Rocks, and soon after this date was ordered to the north side of James river. On the 25th of June, it was posted about five miles from Richmond, between the York River Railroad and the Williamsburg road, occupying rifle pits in the margin of a woods from the railroad to the Williamsburg road. There was constant skirmishing along the line. On 29th it moved to the Charles City road; on 30th moved down the ro
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 29. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Memoir of Jane Claudia Johnson. (search)
Dana and Miles had expected, for cruelty is not a characteristic of the American. The fact that a State prisoner, who had been the chosen head of an empire, had been put in irons excited sympathy and indignation instead of applause. Hence, on May 28th, Secretary of War Stanton telegraphed Miles from Washington (Id., p. 577): Please report whether irons have or have not been placed on Jefferson Davis. * * If they have been, when was it done, and for what reason, and remove them. To this cure, and hence under his plea that he but obeyed orders, the only question is whether there was any cause which rendered it reasonably necessary for him to apply any such mode of obtaining greater security. In his letter to Stanton, of the 28th of May, he gives as his excuse, that the inner doors were light wooden ones without locks, and hence he put anklets on the prisoner's ankles which would not interfere with his walking, but would prevent his running, should he endeavor to escape. The
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 29. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), The trials and trial of Jefferson Davis. (search)
Dana and Miles had expected, for cruelty is not a characteristic of the American. The fact that a State prisoner, who had been the chosen head of an empire, had been put in irons excited sympathy and indignation instead of applause. Hence, on May 28th, Secretary of War Stanton telegraphed Miles from Washington (Id., p. 577): Please report whether irons have or have not been placed on Jefferson Davis. * * If they have been, when was it done, and for what reason, and remove them. To this cure, and hence under his plea that he but obeyed orders, the only question is whether there was any cause which rendered it reasonably necessary for him to apply any such mode of obtaining greater security. In his letter to Stanton, of the 28th of May, he gives as his excuse, that the inner doors were light wooden ones without locks, and hence he put anklets on the prisoner's ankles which would not interfere with his walking, but would prevent his running, should he endeavor to escape. The
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 36. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), chapter 1.6 (search)
ecember, 1779, it was worth $38. In 1780 it took $1,000 in Continental bills to buy $25 in hard dollars. The following accounts, copied from original vouchers printed some years ago in the Historical Magazine, will, perhaps, give a better idea of the depreciation of the currency then in use, than could be done otherwise, as they exhibit the real difference in business transactions between Continental paper and specie in 1781: The United States 1781. To Samuel Martin, Dr. *** May 28.—To shoeing two wagon horses belonging to the Continental60 pounds Received the above sum this day of Mr. Thomas Pitt (Signed) Samuel Martin. The United States Sept. 2. To Wm. Hansill, Dr. *** To 1 1/2 pounds Brown thread at 88 shillings per pound. Depreciation at at 600 per 1360 pounds Staunton, Va., 27th Sept., 1781. Received payment. (Signed) Wm. Hansill. The United States 1781. To Richard Mathews, Dr. *** Oct. 17th.—To 1,000 wt. of Bar
Historic leaves, volume 6, April, 1907 - January, 1908, Company E, 39th Massachusetts Infantry, in the Civil War.—(Iii.) (search)
again, and marched almost continuously till 8 o'clock the next morning, when we halted for breakfast. At 11 a. m. the march was resumed. (All this marching was a left flank movement.) At 7 p. m. we arrived at Hanover town. This ended a hard march of twenty-two hours. We had not had our clothes off in twenty-four days. No one thought of washing his face much less of taking a bath. It can be imagined in what a filthy condition we were. This state of things lasted from May 4 to June 16. May 28. We turned out at 4 and marched at (6, crossing the Pemunky River near Newcastle. We halted three miles from the river, built breastworks, and passed the night. Richmond was about fifteen miles from us. May 29. The march was resumed at 10 a. m., and two miles were covered. Our regiment passed along the line of works to the extreme left, to guard some crossroads; here breastworks were constructed, and the regiment went on picket. It added to the discomfiture that we were out of ratio
adm. Pct. ch. at organization, 9 Sept. 1739. He belonged to the Baptist Society in this Pct. 1787, and d. 5 Feb. 1809, at the age of 101. [His mother d. in 1772, a. 102.] Sarah, w. of Thomas, d. 1 Nov. 1772, a. 59. She was Sarah Cutter, pub. in 1731, dau. of Gershom Cutter-Cutter (par. 8). Had Thomas, Jr., d. 26 July, 1756, a.—; John; Gershom; Sarah, b.———, 1740, bap. 13 Apr. 1740, m. Samuel Swan, 1 Jan. 1761; Hannah, b. 25 Apr., bap. 2 May, 1742, d. unm. 7 Feb. 1773, a. 31; Aaron, b. 28 May, bap. 3 June, 1744; a child, stillborn, 12 Apr. 1751; Mary, b. 7 Oct. 1752, d. 5 June, 1769, a. 17; a son, b. 13 June, 1756. A dau., prob. of Thomas, Jr., b. 18 July, 1756. Hannah had a son, b. 25 Feb. 1762. (John Williams, of Thomas, bap. by Ebenezer Hancock, at Menotomy, 22 Feb. 1736.—Lex. 1st Ch. Records. ) 4. John, had dau. b. here 20 Oct. 1741—prob. the John, of Groton, who m. Elizabeth Cutter, 5 May, 1741—Cutter Book, 92. John, of Groton, d. at Mrs. Bowman's, 4 Nov. 17
Comte de Paris, History of the Civil War in America. Vol. 2. (ed. Henry Coppee , LL.D.), Book I:—Richmond. (search)
he banks of the Chickahominy were soon to be ensanguined by a desperate struggle. The Confederates were in fact collecting all their disposable forces for the protection of Richmond. The civil government as well as the personnel of the administration, who in that capital, as at Washington, fancied that all the interest of the war was centred in the defence of their bureaus, had passed from the utter discouragement caused by the loss of the Virginia to the most absolute confidence. On the 28th and 29th of May, considerable reinforcements came to join Johnston's army, Anderson's division among the rest; this officer, on seeing McDowell rushing in pursuit of Jackson, instead of following in his tracks, had quickly brought back his troops from Bowling Green to Richmond. The position of the army of the Potomac seemed, on the other hand, to invite an attack. Its left, thrown over the unfriendly bank of the Chickahominy, and inactive for the last seven days, occupied a position which
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