hide Sorting

You can sort these results in two ways:

By entity
Chronological order for dates, alphabetical order for places and people.
By position (current method)
As the entities appear in the document.

You are currently sorting in ascending order. Sort in descending order.

hide Most Frequent Entities

The entities that appear most frequently in this document are shown below.

Entity Max. Freq Min. Freq
McClellan 53 29 Browse Search
Lincoln 14 8 Browse Search
James T. Wilson 14 0 Browse Search
Burnside 14 2 Browse Search
Richmond (Virginia, United States) 12 0 Browse Search
Missouri (Missouri, United States) 10 0 Browse Search
Chandler 10 8 Browse Search
Henderson 9 9 Browse Search
Davis 8 6 Browse Search
Fortress Monroe (Virginia, United States) 8 0 Browse Search
View all entities in this document...

Browsing named entities in The Daily Dispatch: July 15, 1862., [Electronic resource].

Found 569 total hits in 267 results.

... 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 26 27
ents to Gen. McClellan. It was intended that this assault upon the Secretary of War should be deadly and lead to his removal. He (Mr. Chandler) denied that Secretary Stanton was guilty of this crime, and lie (Mr. Chandler) simply called for the evidence in the case. It is plain to every man in the land that when the army was senal. Was it not proper that these facts should go to the country? Was it not right that the people should know what the facts really are? The President and Secretary Stanton sent every solitary man, every musket, every sabre, and every bayonet to the army of the Peninsula that could possibly be spared from the defence of the capital. Nothing was refused to that army that could by any possibility be spared. Was it not fair, then, that the press should stop denouncing the man (Secretary Stanton) who was opposed to this division of the army, but who was in favor of marching the army straight into Richmond? Mr. Wright thought such speeches as had been m
chmond. It was understood there were three plans. One was that of General Rosecranz, to go by the valley of the Shenandoah to Richmond, and he (Mr. Wilson) believed that the Secretary of War approved of this plan. Another plan was to go down to Richmond by way of the Rappahannock. The third plan was to go to Richmond by way of the Peninania, which was the plan of General McClellan. The resolution of Mr. Chandler was then passed, by yeas 39, nays 6. Nays--Messrs. Anthony, Foster, Lane of Kansas, McDougall, Saulsbury, and Wright. The bill relative to calling out the militia, with the amendments authorizing the arming of the blacks, their employment on entrenchments, &c., and freeing the wife, mother, and children of negroes so employed, was then called up. A motion to postpone indefinitely was disagreed to by a vote of nine against twenty seven. An amendment that loyal persons shall be compensated for loss of service of slaves taken under the bill was agreed to.
lellan and stuff. Soon after, the whole party disembarked, and, upon reaching the landing, they mounted and proceeded to the headquarters of Gen. McClellan, and thence without much delay to review the whole army. Many of the men were at work in the ditches, and among the latter were one or two ex-Congressmen. All were cheerful and sanguine of early and final success. The President returned this evening from his visit to the army of Gen. McClellan. He was accompanied by Assistant Secretary of War Watson, Gen. Negley, and Col. F. P. Blair, Jr. During the several days spent in the Army of the Potomac the President had an opportunity to see for himself its condition and capacity. On Tuesday he reviewed the whole army, passing along the front in sight of the rebel pickets. Everywhere he was received with deafening cheers. At one point of the line he could not refrain from dismounting from his horse, and mounting a parapet in plain view of the enemy, and making a brief speec
without delay. The President expresses himself delighted with his visit. On the way up the Potomac the boat was aground for several hours on the Kettle Shoals, and the whole party, including the President, availed themselves of the opportunity to take a bath and swim in the river. This delay occasioned some anxiety in the Presidential household, which was allayed by his arrival this evening. Lively times in the Federal Congress--a Victim wanted. In the Federal Senate, on the 10th, Mr. Chandler. (Rep.,) of Michigan, called for all the correspondence between Gen. McClellan and the Government. Mr. Wright, of Ind, thought it too bad, in the time of the "country's trouble. " to make charged against the Generals in the field. He would stand by the man who was fighting the battles of his country. Mr. Chandler said that the Senator from Indiana (Mr. Wright) must have mistaken his (Mr. Chandler's) remarks. The press of the country has been filled with denunciation
ed for all the correspondence between Gen. McClellan and the Government. Mr. Wright, of Ind, thought it too bad, in the time of the "country's trouble. " to makebattles of his country. Mr. Chandler said that the Senator from Indiana (Mr. Wright) must have mistaken his (Mr. Chandler's) remarks. The press of the country h army, but who was in favor of marching the army straight into Richmond? Mr. Wright thought such speeches as had been made here were dangerous to the Union, and ling to hear any different opinion concerning him. The Senator from Indiana, (Mr. Wright,) with strange forgetfulness, says that General McClellan has not defended himself in the newspapers. Has that Senator (Mr. Wright) read the papers? The papers have been full of the praises, of General McClellan, and of his "great strategic . Nays--Messrs. Anthony, Foster, Lane of Kansas, McDougall, Saulsbury, and Wright. The bill relative to calling out the militia, with the amendments a
shouts. The occasion was the passage through our long drawn up lines of President Lincoln. Gen. McClellan and staff. It was after nine o'clock when the President fect of the visit will be splendid. It shows the interest in the army of President Lincoln, and is an earnest of fulfillment of his promise to furnish every requirere history of the Grand Army of the Potomac. The unexpected visit of President Lincoln to this army has had an excellent effect. He was, as before stated, mostress Monroe, date the 9th gives an account of the return to that place: Mr. Lincoln had not returned up to noon, and his movements are so quiet we fail to find anza, and appeared as jovial and genial as possible. Upon reaching here Mr. Lincoln dined with Gen. Burnside, upon the Alice Price. Gen. Dix and several other while the salute was given. The fort returned the salute, gun for gun. Mr. Lincoln will probably return to Washington to-night, and the fruits of his most prop
after, the whole party disembarked, and, upon reaching the landing, they mounted and proceeded to the headquarters of Gen. McClellan, and thence without much delay to review the whole army. Many of the men were at work in the ditches, and among the latter were one or two ex-Congressmen. All were cheerful and sanguine of early and final success. The President returned this evening from his visit to the army of Gen. McClellan. He was accompanied by Assistant Secretary of War Watson, Gen. Negley, and Col. F. P. Blair, Jr. During the several days spent in the Army of the Potomac the President had an opportunity to see for himself its condition and capacity. On Tuesday he reviewed the whole army, passing along the front in sight of the rebel pickets. Everywhere he was received with deafening cheers. At one point of the line he could not refrain from dismounting from his horse, and mounting a parapet in plain view of the enemy, and making a brief speech to the soldiers of the
m Fort Monroe. Fortress Monroe, July 8, P. M.--A. flag of truce was sent up York river yesterday, and returned this afternoon. At Cumberland they found 105 of our wounded soldiers held as prisoners by the rebels. The latter readily consented to give them up. Arrangements were at once made to convey them to the landing; where the steamer Jno. Tucker lay. When they had been conveyed about one mile, a rebel cavalry corps came up and compelled them all to return to the hospital, and Dr. Bradley, of the Hygeia Hospital. was taken prisoner, but subsequently released. The wounded soldiers were all left at the Cumberland Hospital where they found them, in the hands of the rebels. The joy of the poor wounded soldiers at their anticipated release was very great; but when they were informed that they must return to the hospital again, and be left there as prisoners, their grief was indescribable, especially among those who were sick. The scene was heart-rending. The steamer Ca
hours on the Kettle Shoals, and the whole party, including the President, availed themselves of the opportunity to take a bath and swim in the river. This delay occasioned some anxiety in the Presidential household, which was allayed by his arrival this evening. Lively times in the Federal Congress--a Victim wanted. In the Federal Senate, on the 10th, Mr. Chandler. (Rep.,) of Michigan, called for all the correspondence between Gen. McClellan and the Government. Mr. Wright, of Ind, thought it too bad, in the time of the "country's trouble. " to make charged against the Generals in the field. He would stand by the man who was fighting the battles of his country. Mr. Chandler said that the Senator from Indiana (Mr. Wright) must have mistaken his (Mr. Chandler's) remarks. The press of the country has been filled with denunciations of the Secretary of War for what they said was a military crime on his part — not sending reinforcements to Gen. McClellan. It was inte
sacrifice to put down this rebellion, and he believed they would do it. Mr. Davis, (opp.) of Ky., was in favor of the resolution, but condemned the Secretary oity to Gen. McClellan. Mr. Morrill, (rep.) of Me., asked if the Senator (Mr. Davis) stated what he knew, or was it on mere information? rM. Davis said whatDavis said what he had stated he understood to be so, and if the Senator would give him (Mr. Davis) a committee he thought he could prove it. Mr. Chandler said that General McMr. Davis) a committee he thought he could prove it. Mr. Chandler said that General McClellan's plan, as submitted, was to leave the enemy at Manassas and the Potomac river blockaded, and the whole army was to be shipped off by the way of Annapolis. o be stated fairly. Mr. Wilson, of Mass, said the Senator from Kentucky (Mr. Davis) had made some statements which ought not to go to the country. He (Mr. Wilsn) said, without hesitation or qualification, that the Senator from Kentucky (Mr. Davis) was utterly mistaken. He (Mr. Wilson) did not believe that the Secretary of
... 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 26 27