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bear for a concentrated effort. Colonel Preston telegraphed to the President from Corinth, April 7th. General Johnston fell yesterday while leading a successful charge, turning the enemy's ritinent. He says (page 89), With the exception of one or two severe struggles, the fighting of April 7th was light when compared with that of Sunday. Again (page 93): It was the fiercest fight of thred by such an auxiliary as the enemy's gunboats. About six o'clock on the morning of the 7th of April, however, a hot fire of musketry and artillery, opened from the enemy's quarter on our advanc their encampments; but, despite the heavy casualties of the two eventful days of the 6th and 7th of April, this army is more confident of ultimate success than before its encounter with the enemy. Brewster and Wickliffe, who remained, and rendered valuable services as staff officers on the 7th of April. Governor Isham G. Harris, of Tennessee, went upon the field with General Johnston, was b
one; these causes, acting in conjunction with certain moral influences, the depression of retreat and inaction, produced obstinate types of diarrhea and typhoid fever. The attempt to bore artesian wells failed. No sound men were left. Beauregard twice offered Halleck battle. But he preferred regular approaches, in the mean time seizing the railroad east of Corinth, and cutting off communication with the seaboard. There was nothing to be done except to retreat, which Beauregard did, May 30th, falling back to Tupelo, on the Ohio & Mississippi Railroad. The retreat was made in good order, and with no very considerable loss in men or material of war. But the abandonment of Corinth, which was a point of the first strategic importance, involved the surrender of Memphis and the Mississippi Valley, and the loss of the campaign. General Beauregard, whose health continued bad, devolved the command of the army on General Bragg, and retired to Mobile for rest and recuperation. The Pres
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