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Browsing named entities in a specific section of Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 17. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones). Search the whole document.

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to accomplish the objects of his proclamation, one of which, as I have shown, had been declared to be unlawful by the Supreme Court of the United States, and the others were so vague that the border States themselves might be embraced within their scope. Their resolution was quickly taken upon the question thus suddenly forced upon them. The convention of Arkansas, which on the 18th of March had refused to adopt an ordinance of secession by a vote of 35 to 39, assembled again on the 6th of May and passed that ordinance by a vote of 69 to 1. In North Carolina, which had refused in February to call a convention, one was called immediately upon the appearance of the proclamation, which met on the 20th of May and passed an ordinance of secession the following day. In Tennessee, which had refused to call a convention in February, the people ratified an ordinance of secession on the 24th of June by a vote of 104,019 to 47,238, as announced by the Governor. In the Virginia conventi
June 15th, 1887 AD (search for this): chapter 1.12
en property are hereby selected and determined upon for the monument to be erected to General Robert E. Lee by this association. Preparing the site. September I, 1887, an engineer of the association was employed, and a contract was awarded to Messrs. Philips & Ford for excavating and grading, at $450. The engineer was directed to correspond with Mr. Caspar Buberl, a New York sculptor, and to employ him to cut the scroll work around the plinth of the pedestal, which was done. On June 15, 1887, the treasurer reported that the funds in hand amounted to $55,972.56. The following letter was laid before the committee in December of the same year by Governor Lee: My Dear Governor,—I send you a draft on New York for $1,000 as my contribution to the monument to General Lee. I have heretofore contributed, but the amount was not as much as I desired. I desire that this amount be devoted to furnishing a solid granite block for the equestrian statue to rest on, as shown in the
March, 1884 AD (search for this): chapter 1.12
artist for the statue during the terms of Governors Holliday and Cameron, although collections continued to be made. In the meantime, by deaths and removals from the State, the active members of the Ladies' Association were reduced to two, Miss Nicholas and Miss Randolph, although their surviving colleagues were occasionally consulted. Some confusion arising from several associations collecting money for the same object, the collections by each were doubtless somewhat retarded. In March, 1884, by an act of Assembly, the Lee Monument Association and the Ladies' Lee Monument were consolidated, but the two did not at once act in unison. During the administration of Governor Kemper a law was passed constituting the Governor, the Treasurer and the Auditor of the State a board of managers for the Lee Monument Association. The Soldiers' Association disbanded and turned over to this board their funds, and by the zeal and efficiency of the secretary, Colonel S. Basset French, colle
April, 1862 AD (search for this): chapter 1.12
, early in the campaign of 1862, to write an account of a brilliant performance of some of his troops, and having been an eye-witness, and being new to such things, I naturally put a good many adjectives into the narrative. When I took the report to him he struck out every adjective, saying: Leave them out, sir; is not a true account of what they did adjective enough? I shall confine myself to a very general statement of what he did. Richmond, after the destruction of the Virginia in April, 1862, became practically a frontier post, but its possession was necessary to prevent the loss of Virginia and the transfer of the war south of the Roanoke. It was as easy for the enemy to land an army within a few miles of the city without obstruction, as it was to transport one from Washington to Alexandria. Richmond depended for the support of its inhabitants, and the army that defended Richmond depended for its supplies of all kinds, upon long and exposed lines of railway, the defens
February 9th, 186 AD (search for this): chapter 1.12
861, is as follows: An act to continue in force certain laws of the United States of America. Be it enacted by the Confederate States of America in Congress assembled, That all the laws of the United States of America in force and in use in the Confederate States of America on the first day of November last, and not inconsistent with the Constitution of the Confederate States, be and the same are hereby continued in force until altered or repealed by the Congress. Adopted February 9, 186. The exception named in the act I have quoted, included no law that had been among the causes of dispute between the two parts of the Union. The Confederate Constitution restricted the power of Congress with reference to duties on imports, but secession had not been resorted to in order to relieve the seceding States from legislation on the subject of duties. A remarkable illustration of what I now say occurred during the discussion in the convention of South Carolina of the add
September 22nd (search for this): chapter 1.12
l the consequences of that measure, by returning to the Federal Union. How emancipation came about. Emancipation, therefore, was used as a threat to the States that should continue to resist the Federal arms after the 1st day of January, 1863, and protection to slavery by the Federal Government was the reward promised to such States as should cease to resist. But Mr. Lincoln has left no room for doubt as to his views on this subject. One month before the warning proclamation of September 22d, he wrote to Mr. Greeley as follows: My paramount object is to save the Union and not either to save or destroy slavery. If I could save the Union without freeing any slaves I would do it; and if I could save it by freeing all the slaves I would do it, and if I could save it by freeing some and leaving others alone I would do that also. What I do about slavery and the colored race I do because I believe it helps to save the Union, and what I forbear I forbear because I do not bel
consideration of the surroundings proposed by them and submitted to us in the plan and survey of Colonel C. P. E. Burgwyn, including the broad intersecting avenues and open area or place about the monument circle, which dedication and survey are to be parts of the deed and recorded therewith, the location and site upon the Allen property are hereby selected and determined upon for the monument to be erected to General Robert E. Lee by this association. Preparing the site. September I, 1887, an engineer of the association was employed, and a contract was awarded to Messrs. Philips & Ford for excavating and grading, at $450. The engineer was directed to correspond with Mr. Caspar Buberl, a New York sculptor, and to employ him to cut the scroll work around the plinth of the pedestal, which was done. On June 15, 1887, the treasurer reported that the funds in hand amounted to $55,972.56. The following letter was laid before the committee in December of the same year by Governo
March 13th, 1884 AD (search for this): chapter 1.12
the second to Mr. Ezekiel. The Ladies' Association had not bound itself to give the work to the most successful competitor, and the exhibition having put them en rapport with artists of superior talent, they still had the world before them where to choose, with this advantage added. Governor Lee's work. In the meantime General Fitzhugh Lee was inaugurated Governor of Virginia, and being ex officio president of the Lee Monument Association under the act of the General Assembly of March 13th, 1884, with characteristic energy he began to take measures to bring about, without further delay, the erection of the monument. He proposed that the two associations should unite in their action, and called a meeting at the office of the Governor of Virginia, in the Capitol at Richmond, on May 15th, 1886. Present: Governor Fitzhugh Lee, Colonel Archer Anderson, Miss Sarah N. Randolph, Miss E. B. Nicholas, Morton Marye, Auditor of Public Accounts, A. W. Harman, Jr., Treasurer of the Common
this charge. Virginian born, descended from a family illustrious in the colonial history of Virginia, more illustrious still in her struggle for independence, and most illustrious in her recent effort to maintain the great principles declared in 1776; given by Virginia to the service of the United States, he represented her in the Military Academy at West Point. He was not educated by the Federal Government, but by Virginia; for she paid her full share for the support of that institution, and who believe he fought only for Virginia. He was ready to go anywhere, on any service for the good of his country, and his heart was as broad as the fifteen States struggling for the principles that our forefathers fought for in the Revolution of 1776. This day we unite our words of sorrow with those of the good and great throughout Christendom, for his fame has gone over the water—his deeds will be remembered, and when the monument we build shall have crumbled into dust, his virtues will li
as well as to the assailants of Fort Sumter. The proclamation is as follows, omitting that part which summons Congress to meet in extraordinary session on the 4th of July following: The momentous document. Whereas the laws of the United States have been for some time past and now are opposed and the execution thereof obstrurity of law. Mr. Lincoln assumed the responsibility of the acts of Mr. Cameron, and informed Congress that in addition to the things enumerated in his message of July 4th, he had disbursed the public money at his own will, through government officials or private citizens, at his pleasure. Full significance of the proclamation. it the coloring of the most odious of all tyranny—the tyranny of numbers unrestrained by law. And that touch is not wanting. Mr. Lincoln, in his message of July 4th, already referred to, after recapitulating some of the things he had done, says: Those measures, whether strictly legal or not, were ventured upon what app
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