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October 19th (search for this): chapter 11
s to General Canby to move all available forces in Mobile Bay and elsewhere to Brunswick and up the Savannah and Gulf Railroad, as directed by you on the 13th, but on learning that Sherman's operations were uncertain I withheld the order. October 19th Sherman telegraphed Thomas: * * * * I propose with the Armies of Ohio, Tennessee, and two corps of this, to sally forth and make a hole in Georgia and Alabama that will be hard to mend. I will, probably, about November 1st, break up the rs preference for Savannah as the objective, and fixing Dalton as the northern limit for the destruction of the railway. To this alternative letter Halleck replied, under date of October 31: The alternatives mentioned in your letter of October 19th will be prepared for by boats at Hilton Head and Pensacola, with means of transportation to any point where required. Certain correspondence, which passed between General Sherman before Atlanta and General Canby before Mobile, has a forci
October 17th (search for this): chapter 11
shville: Send me Morgan's and Newton's old divisions. Reestablish the road, and I will follow Hood wherever he may go. * * * * General Thomas' reply was (October 17): * * * * Mower and Wilson have arrived and are on their way to join you. I hope you will adopt Grant's idea of turning Wilson loose, rather than undertake t's reply of October 11th was printed in full in his final report of the operations of the armies. On page 157 Sherman says: So it is clear that at that date [October 17] neither General Grant nor General Thomas heartily favored my proposed plan of campaign. And yet the day before this he had telegraphed Halleck: I got the whether Savannah or Mobile be preferred; but I also want to know if you are willing that I should destroy Atlanta and the railroad. And on this very date (October 17) he had received the following from General Grant: The moment I know you have started south, stores will be shipped to Hilton Head, where there are transpor
March 17th (search for this): chapter 11
of railroad Sigel has to protect he can spare no troops except to move directly to his front. In this way he must get through to inflict great damage on the enemy, or the enemy must detach from one of his armies a large force to prevent it. In other words, if Sigel can't skin himself, he can hold a leg whilst some one else skins. I am, General, very respectfully, your obedient servant, U. S Grant, Lieutenant-General. General Grant had assumed command of all the armies on the 17th of March, and before the month closed matured his general plans for the Spring campaign and sent to all army commanders a map, which he thus describes in his final report of operations: The accompanying map, a copy of which was sent to General Sherman and other comanders in March, 1864, shows by red lines the territory occupied by us at the beginning of the rebellion and at the opening of the campaign of 1864, while those in blue are the lines which it was proposed to occupy. General Sh
August 17th, 1864 AD (search for this): chapter 11
oned in your letter of October 19th will be prepared for by boats at Hilton Head and Pensacola, with means of transportation to any point where required. Certain correspondence, which passed between General Sherman before Atlanta and General Canby before Mobile, has a forcible bearing upon the questions under consideration. It will be noticed that this correspondence began some weeks before the capture of Atlanta, and related to a move beyond upon Montgomery: near Atlanta, August 17, 1864. Major-General Canby, Mobile. Dispatch of the 6th received. * * * * If possible the Alabama River should be possessed by us in connection with my movement. I could easily open communication to Montgomery, but I doubt if you will have troops enough until the September draft. I can press on Atlanta good, but I do not want Kirby Smith here. * * * * W. T. Sherman, Major-General new Orleans, August 27th. By way of Cairo, September 9th, Received at headquarters, September 29, 1864
October 31st (search for this): chapter 11
not purely military or strategic, but it will illustrate the vulnerability of the South. Colonel Bowman, in his Sherman and his Campaigns, a work written in the interest of Sherman, commenting upon the above letter, says: General Grant promptly authorized the proposed movement, indicating, however, his preference for Savannah as the objective, and fixing Dalton as the northern limit for the destruction of the railway. To this alternative letter Halleck replied, under date of October 31: The alternatives mentioned in your letter of October 19th will be prepared for by boats at Hilton Head and Pensacola, with means of transportation to any point where required. Certain correspondence, which passed between General Sherman before Atlanta and General Canby before Mobile, has a forcible bearing upon the questions under consideration. It will be noticed that this correspondence began some weeks before the capture of Atlanta, and related to a move beyond upon Montgomer
October 30th (search for this): chapter 11
th Corps which had been diverted to that quarter to assist General Rosecrans in driving the rebel General Price out of Missouri. This object had been accomplished, and these troops, numbering from eight to ten thousand, had been ordered to Nashville. To these I proposed at first to add only the Fourth Corps (General Stanley), fifteen thousand, and that corps was ordered from Gaylesville to march to Chattanooga and thence to report for orders to General Thomas; but subsequently, on the 30th of October, at Rome, Georgia, learning from General Thomas that the new troops promised by General Grant were coming forward very slowly, I concluded to further reinforce him by General Schofield's corps (Twenty-third), twelve thousand, which corps accordingly marched for Resaca, and there took the cars for Chattanooga. I then knew that General Thomas would have an ample force with which to encounter General Hood any where in the open field, besides garrisons to secure the railroad to his rear, a
January 8th (search for this): chapter 11
hat of enabling the two armies to act as an unit, would be removed. * * * * The same objection will exist probably not to so great an extent, however, if the movement is made in more than one column. This will have to be with an army of the size we will be obliged to use. Heretofore I have refrained from suggesting what might be done in other commands than my own, in cooperation with it, or even to think much over the matter. But, as you have kindly asked me in your letter of the 8th of January, only just received, for an interchange of views on our present situation, I will write you again in a day or two, going outside of my own operations. U. S. Grant, Major-General. Afterward, when General Grant was made Lieutenant-General and ordered East, turning over his command at Nashville to General Sherman, he sent the latter a copy of the above letter for his guidance. Four days after thus unfolding his plan for the Atanta and Gulf campaign to General Halleck, and while G
October 26th (search for this): chapter 11
od in the open field.—Page 166. Hood shifted to Palmetto September 21st; Davis' speech was on the 26th of September, and Hood moved to the west of Decatur October 26th; so that Sherman's account fixes the following points for himself: The move was in his mind's eye, September 21, 1864. He was in doubt as to time and manner after September 26. He had no doubt about the move October 26. The points of the narrative, in the chapter devoted to the question of planning the March to the Sea, are these: Hood having moved upon Sherman's railroad communications, General Thomas returned to Chattanooga with a considerable force, and on the 29th of first arranged. So it is clear that at that date neither General Grant nor General Thomas heartily favored my proposed plan of campaign. * * * * On the 26th of October I learned that Hood's whole army had made its appearance about Decatur, Alabama, and at once caused a strong reconnoissance to be made down the Coosa to near
March 15th (search for this): chapter 11
ssary, to insure success against Mobile, they can be taken from Sherman. * * * * U. S. Grant, Lieutenant-General. The letter to General Banks thus referred to, coupled with further instructions to the same end, was published at length in General Grant's final report dated July 22, 1865: Major-General N. P. Banks, then on an expedition up the Red River against Shreveport, Louisiana, (which had been organized previous to my appointment to command), was notified by me on the 15th of March, of the importance it was that Shreveport should be taken at the earliest possible day, and that if he found that the taking of it would occupy from ten to fifteen days more time than General Sherman had given his troops to be absent from their command, he would send them back at the time specified by General Sherman, even if it led to the abandonment of the main object of the Red River expedition, for this force was necessary to movements east of the Mississippi; that should his expedit
December 21st, 1863 AD (search for this): chapter 11
ant Secretary of War having visited General Grant, and talked over the question of this campaign, returned to Washington and reported fully to the authorities. General Halleck then telegraphed General Grant as follows: Washington, December 21, 1863, 4:30 P. M. Major-General U. S. Grant. As I understand from your dispatch of the 7th, and from conversation with Mr. Dana, you propose: 1. To expel the enemy from East Tennessee, and to provide against his return into that valley. al W. F. Smith in command of the Army of the Potomac had been thoroughly discussed, and Grant, the President, the Secretary of War, and General Halleck agreed that it would be better to select Smith than General Sherman: Washington, December 21, 1863, 6 P. M. Major-General U. S. Grant, Chattanooga. I have had detailed conversations with the President, the Secretary of War, and General Halleck, with respect to your project of a campaign in Alabama. It meets the full approval of them
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