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hom elect the President. As a result, a candidate might have an overwhelming popular majority and yet be defeated in the electoral college. In the elections of 1789, 1792, 1796, and 1800, each elector in the electoral college voted for two candidates for President. The candidate who received the largest electoral vote was decislatures appointed the Presidential electors, and the people's choice was expressed by their votes for members of the legislature. In the tabulation of the votes 1789-1820 only the aggregate electoral votes for candidates for President and Vice-President are given. See popular vote for President. 1789. George Washington, 69;1789. George Washington, 69; John Adams, of Massachusetts, 34; John Jay, of New York, 9; R. H. Harrison, of Maryland, 6; John Rutledge, of South Carolina, 6; John Hancock, of Massachusetts, 4; George Clinton, of New York, 3; Samuel Huntingdon, of Connecticut, 2; John Milton, of Georgia, 2; James Armstrong, of Georgia; Benjamin Lincoln, of Massachusetts, and
dates direct. The people vote for electors, the majority of whom elect the President. As a result, a candidate might have an overwhelming popular majority and yet be defeated in the electoral college. In the elections of 1789, 1792, 1796, and 1800, each elector in the electoral college voted for two candidates for President. The candidate who received the largest electoral vote was declared President, and the candidate who received the next largest number of votes was declared Vice-Preside, of Virginia; John Henry, of Maryland, and S. Johnson, of North Carolina, all Federalists, 2 votes each; Charles Cotesworth Pinckney, of South Carolina, Federalist, 1 vote. John Adams was chosen President and Thomas Jefferson Vice-Presi dent. 1800. Thomas Jefferson, Republican, 73; Aaron Burr, Republican, 73; John Adams, Federalist, 65; Charles C. Pinckney, Federalist, 64; John Jay, Federalist, 1 vote. There being a tie vote for Jefferson and Burr, the choice devolved upon the House of Rep
es see page 291.TennDem1,337,24338,175170George M. Dallas For foot-note references see page 291.PaDem170 Henry ClayKyWhig1,299,068105T. FrelinghuysenN. J.Whig105 James G. BirneyN. Y.Lib62,300Thomas MorrisO.Lib 1848. Zachary Taylor For foot-note references see page 291.LaWhig1,360,101139,557163Millard Fillmore For foot-note references see page 291.N. Y.Whig163 Lewis CassMich.Dem1,220,544127William O. ButlerKyDem127 Martin Van BurenN. Y.F. Soil291,263Charles F. AdamsMass.F. Soil 1852. Franklin Pierce For foot-note references see page 291.N. H.Dem1,601,474220,896254William R. King For foot-note references see page 291.AlaDem254 Winfield ScottN. J.Whig1,380,57642William A. GrahamN. C.Whig42 John P. HaleN. H.F. D. (i)156,149George W. JulianInd.F. D. Daniel Webster (k)Mass.Whig1,670 1856. James Buchanan For foot-note references see page 291.PaDem1,838,169496,905174J. C. Breckinridge For foot-note references see page 291.KyDem174 John C. FremontCalRep1,341,2
tial candidates direct. The people vote for electors, the majority of whom elect the President. As a result, a candidate might have an overwhelming popular majority and yet be defeated in the electoral college. In the elections of 1789, 1792, 1796, and 1800, each elector in the electoral college voted for two candidates for President. The candidate who received the largest electoral vote was declared President, and the candidate who received the next largest number of votes was declared Vis, Federalist, 77; George Clinton, of New York, Republican (a), 50; Thomas Jefferson, of Virginia, Republican, 4; Aaron Burr, of New York, Republican, 1 vote. Vacancies, 3. George Washington was chosen President and John Adams Vice-President. 1796. John Adams, Federalist, 71; Thomas Jefferson, Republican, 68; Thomas Pinckney, of South Carolina, Federalist, 59; Aaron Burr, of New York, Republican, 30; Samuel Adams, of Massachusetts, Republican, 15; Oliver Ellsworth, of Connecticut, Independe
ore For foot-note references see page 291.N. Y.Whig163 Lewis CassMich.Dem1,220,544127William O. ButlerKyDem127 Martin Van BurenN. Y.F. Soil291,263Charles F. AdamsMass.F. Soil 1852. Franklin Pierce For foot-note references see page 291.N. H.Dem1,601,474220,896254William R. King For foot-note references see page 291.AlaDem254 Winfield ScottN. J.Whig1,380,57642William A. GrahamN. C.Whig42 John P. HaleN. H.F. D. (i)156,149George W. JulianInd.F. D. Daniel Webster (k)Mass.Whig1,670 1856. James Buchanan For foot-note references see page 291.PaDem1,838,169496,905174J. C. Breckinridge For foot-note references see page 291.KyDem174 John C. FremontCalRep1,341,264114William L. DaytonN. J.Rep114 Millard FillmoreN. Y.Amer874,5388A. J. DonelsonTennAmer8 1860. Abraham Lincoln For foot-note references see page 291.Ill.Rep1,866,352491,195180Hannibal Hamlin For foot-note references see page 291.MeRep180 Stephen A. DouglasIll.Dem1,375,15712H. V.JohnsonGaDem12 J. C. Brec
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