hide Sorting

You can sort these results in two ways:

By entity
Chronological order for dates, alphabetical order for places and people.
By position (current method)
As the entities appear in the document.

You are currently sorting in ascending order. Sort in descending order.

hide Most Frequent Entities

The entities that appear most frequently in this document are shown below.

Entity Max. Freq Min. Freq
John Pierpont 34 4 Browse Search
John Albree 23 1 Browse Search
January 30th, 1791 AD 22 22 Browse Search
Baltimore, Md. (Maryland, United States) 21 1 Browse Search
Massachusetts (Massachusetts, United States) 20 0 Browse Search
John Dame 18 0 Browse Search
Stoneham (Massachusetts, United States) 18 0 Browse Search
James Pierpont 18 2 Browse Search
James M. G. Plummer 15 7 Browse Search
Charles Brooks 14 0 Browse Search
View all entities in this document...

Browsing named entities in a specific section of Medford Historical Society Papers, Volume 6.. Search the whole document.

Found 515 total hits in 284 results.

... 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 26 27 28 29
lived at the corner of Salem and Fulton streets. Opposite the Gregg estate, on the east side of Main street, next to the river, was the blacksmith shop of Nathan W. Wait, which, strangely enough, was about the only building in the neighborhood which was not consumed on the memorable night of November 2, 1850. Mr. Wait succeeded his father, Nathan Wait, who started the business on the same spot in 1783. The property remained in the family until taken by the Metropolitan Park Commission, in 1901. Mr. Wait's dwelling house was next south of his shop. He went into it in 1826. After it was burned, he built the house now standing on the site. The next building was occupied by William S. Barker grocer, and Leonard Johnson, dealer in grain and meal on the lower floor. James Hyde, painter, occupied the second floor. There were two long oat troughs at the side of the street for feeding horses. The drivers could get gingerbread, crackers, cheese, and beer in the store while their
, the world pushes one side, and there he stays until he rouses himself. The clock itself has undergone changes. When John Albree brought it here, perhaps twenty years after it was made, it had a bell on top supported by the four finials, which are pierced for that purpose. It had a short, bob pendulum that received its name from its rapid appearance at either side through slits in the doors, which have also disappeared. This bob pendulum with this escapement was of the form in use from 1658, when the pendulum was invented, until the long, or royal, pendulum and anchor escapement were invented in 1675. Sometime in the eighteenth century the clock fell into the hands of a blacksmith who fixed clocks when horseshoeing and nail-making were dull. He cleared away the alarm and its works to make the necessary changes so that he could attach the long pendulum. The form of the grandfather's, or hall, clock was developed from this clock. First, a hood was made to keep out the dust; th
January 3rd (search for this): chapter 1
Saturday evening course of lectures for 1903 offers an attractive set of topics. Last month Mr. Walter C. Wright read a paper on the Gypsy Moth: Past, Present and Future, describing the habits of the pest and the most effective way of ridding the city of its ravages. He placed great responsibility on individual occupants of real estate, who might, by conscientious work, keep the moth in check on private property, while the State and City could be fully occupied in taking care of the trees in reservations, parks and highways. The following papers will be given during the winter and spring:— January 3.—Some Evils of our present Nominating System, and how they can be removed. Hon. F. W. Dallinger, of Cambridge. February 7.—Matthew Cradock. Mr. W. K. Watkins, of Malden. March 7.—How can we make Medford more beautiful? Mr. Edward P. Adams. April 4.—The Second Charter of Massachusetts. Mr. Walter H. Cushing. May 2.—Spot Pond, as it was and is. Mr. Herbert
d, his second wife having died on the passage over. Four of his sons came to this country. He died on his farm in Charlestown, May 21, 1654; his widow died at Noddle's Island, now East Boston, in 1676. II. George Blanchard had two wives and ten children; lived on one-half of the farm inherited from his father, and died there March 18, 1700, aged 84. His gravestone is in the Medford burying ground. III. Joseph Blanchard, eldest son of George Blanchard, by his first wife, was born in 1654; married Hannah, daughter of Thomas Shepard of Charlestown, April 13, 1681. He had seven children, and died in Charlestown, on the Blanchard Farm, October 24, 1694, aged 40. His gravestone is in the Medford burying ground. IV. Aaron Blanchard, twin son of Joseph and Hannah (Shepard), was born March 4, 1690; married Sarah——; had twelve children; died at Medford, September 30, 1769 (?) V. Aaron Blanchard, Jr., son of Aaron and Sarah ——, was born in Medford, May 21, 1722; married, 1st
June 30th (search for this): chapter 1
ke words of inspiration and enthusiasm. Col. Whitney spoke in his quiet way, and stated that Co. E was the first in the regiment to report its ranks full (106 men). The most affecting scene was when Capt. Hutchins, at the close of his remarks, grasped the hand of Col. Whitney, who had enlisted under him, a boy, in 1862. Together they had been through terrible battles, and now, as colonel, the younger man was to lead the dear old 5th wherever he was ordered. On the morning of the thirtieth of June, the square was full of people. The Light Guard was escorted by S. C. Lawrence Post 66 and the High School Cadets. Col. Whitney marched with the company. History had repeated itself. Again from the ranks of the Lawrence Light Guard a colonel had risen to command the 5th Regiment in time of war. The members of the Light Guard wore the regular blue uniform, the recruits were clad in kahki. The whole city was on the street, but we forgot to cheer. Solemn silence seemed fitting
June 29th (search for this): chapter 1
that the boys would be ordered back to Medford at its close, they were escorted to the cars by the citizens, High School Cadets, and Fire Department. The week was no play-time, for the weather was wet and stormy, and the regiment was exercised in war-time drills. A sharp but unrewarded watch was kept for the Spanish fleet. Orders were received that on the last day of June the Light Guard was to march to South Framingham and be mustered into the United States service. On the evening of June 29, the Opera House was packed to suffocation. Ex-commander George L. Goodale presided. Mayor Lewis H. Lovering made the opening address. Members of the City Government and the Grand Army, clergymen and officers of the company spoke words of inspiration and enthusiasm. Col. Whitney spoke in his quiet way, and stated that Co. E was the first in the regiment to report its ranks full (106 men). The most affecting scene was when Capt. Hutchins, at the close of his remarks, grasped the hand of
ared, but from 1835 to 1850, the custom was almost universal. After the fire in 1850, most of the buildings destroyed were replaced by cheaper structures, many of which are still in existence. The Tufts lot, corner of South and Main streets, remained vacant for many years. Finally, the Central Engine House was built there. Ancestry of Aaron Blanchard, periwig-maker. I. Thomas Blanchard, the emigrant, came from Hampshire, England, in 1639. He lived in Braintree, Mass., from 1646 to 1651. In February, 1651, he bought of Rev. John Wilson, Jr., pastor of the church in Dorchester, a house and farm of two hundred acres in Charlestown, lying on the north side of Mystic river, and between Malden river on the east, and the Cradock farm, or Medford line, on the west. This land is now known as Wellington. The farm remained a part of the town of Charlestown until 1726,, when it was annexed to Malden, but later set off to Medford. Thomas Blanchard was married twice in England, and m
disappeared, but from 1835 to 1850, the custom was almost universal. After the fire in 1850, most of the buildings destroyed were replaced by cheaper structures, many of which are still in existence. The Tufts lot, corner of South and Main streets, remained vacant for many years. Finally, the Central Engine House was built there. Ancestry of Aaron Blanchard, periwig-maker. I. Thomas Blanchard, the emigrant, came from Hampshire, England, in 1639. He lived in Braintree, Mass., from 1646 to 1651. In February, 1651, he bought of Rev. John Wilson, Jr., pastor of the church in Dorchester, a house and farm of two hundred acres in Charlestown, lying on the north side of Mystic river, and between Malden river on the east, and the Cradock farm, or Medford line, on the west. This land is now known as Wellington. The farm remained a part of the town of Charlestown until 1726,, when it was annexed to Malden, but later set off to Medford. Thomas Blanchard was married twice in Englan
January 7th, 1787 AD (search for this): chapter 1
ied at Medford, September 30, 1769 (?) V. Aaron Blanchard, Jr., son of Aaron and Sarah ——, was born in Medford, May 21, 1722; married, 1st, Rebecca Hall of Medford, November 13, 1745. She died November 13, 1749. He married, 2d, Tabitha Floyd, who was born March, 1729, and died July 31, 1775. His third wife was Rebecca Tufts, widow of Ichabod, and daughter of Samuel Francis of Medford; they were married November 14, 1776. She died in Medford, January 28, 1817. He died in Medford, January 7, 1787. He was the father of fourteen children. He was a periwig-maker and was generally referred to in Medford as Barber Blanchard. Benjamin Crandon Leonard. Benjamin Crandon Leonard was born in Plymouth, February 16, 1844. He was a son of Joseph Nelson and Abbie Bishop (Crandon) Leonard, and was a lineal descendant of John Howland and Richard Warren of the Mayflower. At the age of eighteen he obtained employment with the American Bank Note Co. of Boston, and remained with them
es. When John Albree brought it here, perhaps twenty years after it was made, it had a bell on top supported by the four finials, which are pierced for that purpose. It had a short, bob pendulum that received its name from its rapid appearance at either side through slits in the doors, which have also disappeared. This bob pendulum with this escapement was of the form in use from 1658, when the pendulum was invented, until the long, or royal, pendulum and anchor escapement were invented in 1675. Sometime in the eighteenth century the clock fell into the hands of a blacksmith who fixed clocks when horseshoeing and nail-making were dull. He cleared away the alarm and its works to make the necessary changes so that he could attach the long pendulum. The form of the grandfather's, or hall, clock was developed from this clock. First, a hood was made to keep out the dust; then the hood was supported by a long case which protected the pendulum, for the hanging weights and swinging bob
... 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 26 27 28 29