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March 22nd (search for this): chapter 19
an expedition into Alabama, having for its object co-operation with Canby in the reduction of Mobile, and the capture of important places, particularly Selma, on the Alabama River, where the Confederates had extensive iron founderies. The march of Cheatham toward the Carolinas, with a part of Hood's broken army, and the employment of the remainder at Mobile, made nearly the whole of Thomas's force in Tennessee, disposable, and Wilson left Chickasaw Landing, on the Tennessee River, on the 22d of March, with about thirteen thousand men, composing the divisions of Long, Upton and McCook. Knipe's division, we have seen, went with the Sixteenth Army Corps to New Orleans. Hatch's division was left at Eastport. He had six batteries. His men were all mounted excepting fifteen hundred, who were detailed as an escort to the supply and baggage trains of two hundred and fifty wagons. There was also a light pontoon train of thirty boats, carried by fifty six-mule wagons. Each man was well p
e fled up the Alabama River, with nine thousand men, on gun-boats and transports. General Veatch took Battery Gladden. possession of Batteries Gladden and McIntosh, in the harbor, and Battery Missouri, below the city; and on the evening of the 12th, after a summons to surrender, made by General Granger and Rear-Admiral Thatcher, the authorities formally gave the place into their hands at Battery Missouri, below the town. On the following day Veatch's division entered the city, and the Natiohed service, moved upon Montgomery, where General Wirt Adams was in command. Adams did not wait for Wilson's arrival; but, setting fire to ninety thousand bales of cotton in that city, he fled. Wilson entered it, unopposed, on the morning of the 12th, when Major Weston, marching rapidly northward toward Wetumpka, on the Coosa, captured and destroyed five heavily laden Union Prison at Cahawba. sketched from a steamboat, in April, 1866. steamboats, which had fled up that stream for safety
April 16th, 1865 AD (search for this): chapter 19
d and fifty cars; also a large quantity of other property used by the enemy, such as an arsenal, manufactory of small-arms, four cotton factories, three paper-mills, military and naval founderies, a rolling-mill, machine-shops, one hundred thousand rounds of artillery ammunition, and a vast amount of stores. The Confederates burned the Chattahoochee, another of their iron-clad gun-boats, then lying twelve miles below Columbus. In the mean time, La Grange had pushed on to West Point, April 16, 1865. where he found a strong bastioned earth-work, mounting four guns, on a commanding hill, named Fort Tyler, in honor of its then commander, who built it, and had in it a garrison of two hundred and thirty-five men, including officers. It was surrounded by a dry ditch, twelve feet wide and ten deep, and commanded the approaches to the bridge which crossed the Chattahoochee River, and the little village of West Point. This work La Grange assaulted on three sides, with his men dismounted,
roper and its inclosing works, with thirty heavy guns and a large quantity of munitions of war. These guns were now turned upon Forts Huger and Tracy, at the mouth of the Appalachee or Blakely River, which held out gallantly until the night of the 11th, April, 1865. when the garrison spiked the twelve guns that armed the two forts, and fled. The defense of Spanish Fort was skillfully and gallantly conducted, under General Gibson. From the beginning of the siege, the garrison had looked for onnection with the gun-boats, which went from place to place, taking possession of abandoned batteries here and there. But the army found no enemy to fight. On the day after the fall of Blakely, Maury ordered the evacuation of Mobile; and on the 11th, after sinking the powerful rams Huntsville and Tuscaloosa, It is a curious fact that a very large proportion of the most powerful iron-clad vessels constructed by the Confederates, were destroyed by their own hands. Only a few days after the
the Alabama River, at Selma, which had been made brimful by recent rains, and then he Ruins of Confederate Foundery. this was the appearance of a portion of the city of Selma, when the writer sketched it, in April, 1866. t; was the site of the great Confederate iron-foundery there. hastened April 6, 1865. to Cahawba, the ancient capital of Alabama, This was the place where De Soto crossed the Alabama River, on his march toward the Mississippi River, which he discovered in the year 1541. a few miles down the stream, to meet General Forrest, under a flag of truce, by appointment, for the purpose of making arrangements for an exchange of prisoners. They met at the fine mansion of Mr. Mathews, This gentleman informed the writer that the two officers dined at his house; and after Forrest had eaten his food and drunk his wine, he plundered his plantation on leaving. near the landing in sight of a large cotton warehouse, on the high bank of the river, from which Wilson, on his
in height, loomed up a mile or so north of us. From Decatur onward, the earth-works of both parties were seen in thickening lines, and at twilight we were in the midst of the ruined city of Atlanta, then showing some hopeful signs of resurrection from its ashes. We passed a rainy day in Atlanta, the writer leaving the examination of the intrenchments and the battle-fields around it until a second visit, See page 404. which he intended to make a few weeks later, and on the morning of the 8th, April, 1866. in chilling, cheerless air, we departed on a journey by railway, to Montgomery, on the Alabama River. We passed through the lines of heavy works in that direction, a great portion of the way to East Point, and from there onward, nearly every mile of the road was marked by the ravages of camping armies, or active and destructive raiders. The country between Fairborn and La Grange was a special sufferer by raids. In the vicinity of Newham the gallant Colonel James Brownlow was
March 31st (search for this): chapter 19
was driven across the Cahawba to Montevallo, as sharply pursued as felled trees, which the fugitives left behind them, would allow. Upton passed the Cahawba with his whole division, pushed on to Montevallo, and in that region destroyed the large Red Mountain, Central, Bibb, and Columbiana Iron-works, the Cahawba Rolling-mills, and five important collieries. These were all in operation, and were a serious loss to the Confederates. Wilson arrived at Montevallo on the afternoon of the 31st of March. Upton was just ready to move forward. Just then the Confederates made their appearance on the Selma road, driving in Upton's pickets. These consisted of the commands of Roddy and Crossland. After a sharp fight with Alexander's brigade, they were routed by a charge of the Fifth Iowa Cavalry, and driven in confusion toward Randolph. They attempted to make a stand at Six-mile Creek, south of Montevallo, but were again routed with a loss of fifty men made prisoners. Upton bivouacked f
March 30th (search for this): chapter 19
bile and Montgomery, but Wilson was keeping him too thoroughly occupied in the interior to allow him to leave. The garrison displayed great courage and resolution. It made at least a dozen sorties during the siege. One of them, made on the 30th of March, was a brilliant success. At sunset the bombardment had ceased, when a party of the garrison, under Captain Watson, concealed by the smoke. rushed out over their works and captured Captain Stearns, of the Seventh Vermont, with twenty men, wmotion, to meet the danger. He sent Chalmers by way of Bridgeville toward Tuscaloosa. Hearing of this, March 27, 1865. Wilson put his forces in rapid motion, with ample supplies, for Montevallo, beyond the Cahawba River. Arriving at Elyton, March 30. he directed McCook to send Croxton's brigade to Tuscaloosa for the purpose of burning the public property and destroying founderies and factories there. The adventures of that brigade, which did not rejoin the main body until the expedition ha
which he had set on fire. See next page. Forrest was indisposed to act fairly in the matter. He evidently expected to recapture the prisoners Wilson had taken at Selma, and was arrogant in manner and speech. The latter returned; but in consequence of the flood, which had three times swept away the pontoon bridge, 870 feet in length, which Hubbard had thrown across the river, Wilson's army did not make the passage of the stream until the 10th. April, 1865. McCook had rejoined him on the 5th, and now the whole army, excepting Croxton's brigade, on detached service, moved upon Montgomery, where General Wirt Adams was in command. Adams did not wait for Wilson's arrival; but, setting fire to ninety thousand bales of cotton in that city, he fled. Wilson entered it, unopposed, on the morning of the 12th, when Major Weston, marching rapidly northward toward Wetumpka, on the Coosa, captured and destroyed five heavily laden Union Prison at Cahawba. sketched from a steamboat, in Ap
April 6th, 1865 AD (search for this): chapter 19
through all restraints, ravaged the town for awhile. Wilson now prepared to move eastward into, Georgia, by way of Montgomery. He. directed Major Hubbard to construct a pontoon bridge over the Alabama River, at Selma, which had been made brimful by recent rains, and then he Ruins of Confederate Foundery. this was the appearance of a portion of the city of Selma, when the writer sketched it, in April, 1866. t; was the site of the great Confederate iron-foundery there. hastened April 6, 1865. to Cahawba, the ancient capital of Alabama, This was the place where De Soto crossed the Alabama River, on his march toward the Mississippi River, which he discovered in the year 1541. a few miles down the stream, to meet General Forrest, under a flag of truce, by appointment, for the purpose of making arrangements for an exchange of prisoners. They met at the fine mansion of Mr. Mathews, This gentleman informed the writer that the two officers dined at his house; and after Forre
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