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Browsing named entities in a specific section of Joseph T. Derry , A. M. , Author of School History of the United States; Story of the Confederate War, etc., Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 6, Georgia (ed. Clement Anselm Evans). Search the whole document.

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August 10th, 1862 AD (search for this): chapter 5
, did brilliant work, Lieutenant Holtzclaw, as well as the captain, winning the commendatory notice of General Maxey, the officer in command. The Third Georgia cavalry, Col. Martin J. Crawford, accompanied Gen. Joseph Wheeler in Bragg's Kentucky campaign, and fought gallantly and suffered severely at Munfordville; but at New Haven, Ky., September 29th, Colonel Crawford and about 250 of his command were surprised and captured by a detachment of Col. E. M. McCook's cavalry brigade. On August 10, 1862, Gen. E. Kirby Smith ordered Col. Archibald Gracie, of the Forty-third Alabama, to take a force of infantry and march against a band of east Tennessee Unionists, who had assembled under Col. William Clift near Huntsville, Scott county. He was to have the co-operation of 300 cavalry, under Capt. T. M. Nelson, of Georgia. Gracie's force included some companies that had belonged to Ramsey's First Georgia. After the expiration of the twelve months for which that regiment had enlisted, it
, and had been purchased with the original intention of using her to convey abroad the commissioners, Mason and Slidell. After she entered the river in the summer of 1862, the rigor of the blockade kept her useless until her destruction, early in 1863. In August the steamer Emma, which had several times run the blockade, carrying cotton to Nassau, while trying to make the outward passage on a dark and stormy night, ran aground off the southeast extremity of Jones island. The crew got off in bys later a similar expedition was made up the Doboy river, and a sawmill was raided and the lumber, saws, etc., were carried away. Col. Thomas Wentworth Higginson, of Boston, commander of this negro regiment, led it in another expedition early in 1863, on board three steamers. On the St. Mary's river they were attacked by a daring body of Confederate cavalry. Higginson reported that though fearful of our shot and shell, they were so daring against musketry, that one rebel sprang from the shor
August 23rd (search for this): chapter 5
ns, under Colonel Dunlop and Major Harper, made a gallant charge almost to the mouth of the cannon. After fighting them in front two or three hours I took immediate command of this force and charged the rear of the enemy into their camps and burned their camps and stores, demoralizing their force and weakening their strength. In the following month Colonel Morrison was sent with his troops into Kentucky to occupy Mount Vernon, and at Big Hill he defeated an attack of Federal cavalry, August 23d. At Bridgeport, Ala., August 27th, the Jackson artillery, under Capt. G. A. Dure, did brilliant work, Lieutenant Holtzclaw, as well as the captain, winning the commendatory notice of General Maxey, the officer in command. The Third Georgia cavalry, Col. Martin J. Crawford, accompanied Gen. Joseph Wheeler in Bragg's Kentucky campaign, and fought gallantly and suffered severely at Munfordville; but at New Haven, Ky., September 29th, Colonel Crawford and about 250 of his command were surpri
April, 450 AD (search for this): chapter 5
duty. It was under heavy fire at times on both days of the conflict, but was not actively engaged. Subsequent to the battle of Shiloh, the Fifth Georgia infantry, Gen. J. K. Jackson's old regiment, was attached to his brigade, which was otherwise composed of Alabama regiments. The Thirty-sixth, Thirty-ninth and Forty-third were attached to the command of Gen. Danville Lead-better in east Tennessee, and brought to Chattanooga when that point was threatened. Toward the latter part of April, 450 men of these Georgia regiments under Lead-better opposed the advance of the Federals at Bridgeport. The Forty-first, in the brigade of S. B. Maxey, was at Corinth during the siege by Halleck. The proximity of the Federal forces to the northern part of the State in the spring of 1862, was made manifest by the famous exploit of the Andrews raiders. This expedition was set on foot early in April at the suggestion of James J. Andrews, who had been for some time in the service of General B
July, 1863 AD (search for this): chapter 5
ch Florida was soon added. Gen. Howell Cobb, after the battle of Sharpsburg, was assigned to command of the middle district of Florida, with especial reference to the defense of southwest Georgia, a region which had been blessed with the best crops in the State. In the latter part of the year the State commissioners, James M. Chambers and James F. Bozeman, sunk obstructions in the Appalachicola to prevent a river invasion and protect the gunboat Chattahoochee, then in construction. In July, 1863, the following organizations were included in General Mercer's command, in the district of Georgia: Eighth battalion, Lieutenant-Colonel Reid; Tenth battalion, Major Rylander; Twenty-fifth regiment, Col. C. C. Wilson; Thirtieth regiment. Col. D. J. Bailey; Thirty-second regiment, Col. G. P. Harrison; Fortyenth regiment, Col. G. W. M. Williams; Fiftieth regiment, Col. W. R. Manning; Fifty-fourth regiment, Col. C. H. Way; Fifty-ninth, regiment, Col. Jack Brown; Georgia Guards, Major Screven
August 13th (search for this): chapter 5
twelve months for which that regiment had enlisted, it had been mustered out at Augusta. Four of the companies re-enlisted and formed the Twelfth Georgia battalion under Maj. H. D. Capers. On the way to Tennessee most of the horses were killed in a railroad accident. Only one company, the Newnan artillery, under Capt. G. M. Hanvey, was supplied with cannon, and this went into Kentucky with Heth's division. The other three, serving as infantry, marched with Gracie to Scott county. On August 13th, Gracie's command stormed and captured Fort Clift, scattering the Tennessee Unionists in every direction. They had fired so wildly that no Confederates were seriously hurt. The scattering of this force gave unmolested passage for the wagon trains of Heth's division through Big Creek gap into Kentucky. The three companies of the Twelfth Georgia battalion were left in camp at Jacksboro, Tenn., to assist in picketing Big Creek gap. The following Georgia commands went into Kentucky in
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