hide Sorting

You can sort these results in two ways:

By entity
Chronological order for dates, alphabetical order for places and people.
By position (current method)
As the entities appear in the document.

You are currently sorting in ascending order. Sort in descending order.

hide Most Frequent Entities

The entities that appear most frequently in this document are shown below.

Entity Max. Freq Min. Freq
Grant 23 1 Browse Search
R. E. Lee 18 0 Browse Search
G. P. Copeland 17 1 Browse Search
Herschel V. Johnson 16 0 Browse Search
Ewell 15 1 Browse Search
Jones 14 0 Browse Search
North Carolina (North Carolina, United States) 12 0 Browse Search
United States (United States) 12 0 Browse Search
Butler 10 2 Browse Search
Pegram 10 0 Browse Search
View all entities in this document...

Browsing named entities in The Daily Dispatch: May 25, 1864., [Electronic resource].

Found 478 total hits in 238 results.

... 19 20 21 22 23 24
September 27th, 1864 AD (search for this): article 8
erage period which each denomination of London notes remains in circulation is shown by the following authentic account of the number of days a bank note issued in London remains in circulation: £5 note, 72.7; £10, 77; £20, 57.4, £80, 18.9; £10, 13.7; £50, 88.8; £100, 28.4; £200, 12.7; £300, 10.6; £500, 11.8; £1,000, 11.1. The exceptions to these averages are few, and therefore remarkable. The time during which some notes remain unpresented is beckoned by the century. On the 27th of September, 1864, a £50 note was presented, hearing date 24th January, 1743. Another, for £10, issued on the 19th of November, 1762, was not paid till the 20th of April, 1845. There is a legend extant of the eccentric possessor of a £1,000 note who kept it framed and glazed for a series of years, preferring to feast his eyes upon it to putting the amount it represented out at interest. It was converted into gold, however, without a day's loss of time by his hire, on his demise--4 fact which c
January 24th, 1743 AD (search for this): article 8
n circulation is shown by the following authentic account of the number of days a bank note issued in London remains in circulation: £5 note, 72.7; £10, 77; £20, 57.4, £80, 18.9; £10, 13.7; £50, 88.8; £100, 28.4; £200, 12.7; £300, 10.6; £500, 11.8; £1,000, 11.1. The exceptions to these averages are few, and therefore remarkable. The time during which some notes remain unpresented is beckoned by the century. On the 27th of September, 1864, a £50 note was presented, hearing date 24th January, 1743. Another, for £10, issued on the 19th of November, 1762, was not paid till the 20th of April, 1845. There is a legend extant of the eccentric possessor of a £1,000 note who kept it framed and glazed for a series of years, preferring to feast his eyes upon it to putting the amount it represented out at interest. It was converted into gold, however, without a day's loss of time by his hire, on his demise--4 fact which can very easily be credited. Stolen and lost notes are ge
November 19th, 1762 AD (search for this): article 8
unt of the number of days a bank note issued in London remains in circulation: £5 note, 72.7; £10, 77; £20, 57.4, £80, 18.9; £10, 13.7; £50, 88.8; £100, 28.4; £200, 12.7; £300, 10.6; £500, 11.8; £1,000, 11.1. The exceptions to these averages are few, and therefore remarkable. The time during which some notes remain unpresented is beckoned by the century. On the 27th of September, 1864, a £50 note was presented, hearing date 24th January, 1743. Another, for £10, issued on the 19th of November, 1762, was not paid till the 20th of April, 1845. There is a legend extant of the eccentric possessor of a £1,000 note who kept it framed and glazed for a series of years, preferring to feast his eyes upon it to putting the amount it represented out at interest. It was converted into gold, however, without a day's loss of time by his hire, on his demise--4 fact which can very easily be credited. Stolen and lost notes are generally long absentees. The former usually make their
April 20th, 1845 AD (search for this): article 8
in London remains in circulation: £5 note, 72.7; £10, 77; £20, 57.4, £80, 18.9; £10, 13.7; £50, 88.8; £100, 28.4; £200, 12.7; £300, 10.6; £500, 11.8; £1,000, 11.1. The exceptions to these averages are few, and therefore remarkable. The time during which some notes remain unpresented is beckoned by the century. On the 27th of September, 1864, a £50 note was presented, hearing date 24th January, 1743. Another, for £10, issued on the 19th of November, 1762, was not paid till the 20th of April, 1845. There is a legend extant of the eccentric possessor of a £1,000 note who kept it framed and glazed for a series of years, preferring to feast his eyes upon it to putting the amount it represented out at interest. It was converted into gold, however, without a day's loss of time by his hire, on his demise--4 fact which can very easily be credited. Stolen and lost notes are generally long absentees. The former usually make their appearance soon after a great horse race, or
Poland (Poland) (search for this): article 9
Lessons from Poland's Pate. --The following edicts have been issued in Poland for the more speedy suppression of the rebellion: First an order applicable principally to the districts infested with bands of guerillas. According to it every proprietor shall render to the military authorities an exact account of the number and nature of the horses in his stable; no transfer of horses is to take place without the express permission of the commandant; furthermore, no person shall for the Poland for the more speedy suppression of the rebellion: First an order applicable principally to the districts infested with bands of guerillas. According to it every proprietor shall render to the military authorities an exact account of the number and nature of the horses in his stable; no transfer of horses is to take place without the express permission of the commandant; furthermore, no person shall for the future ride on any horse unless he is actually engaged in the Government service, and for further security all saddles are confiscated; lastly, no bells are to be sounded in any place what ever, except in factories, where signals for rest, &c., can only be given by that means; and in the latter case a list of the hours at which the bell shall be rung is to be posted up under the bell rope. The two first regulations are intended to restrain the general supply of horses to the insurrectionists, t
Louis Napoleon's personal appearance. --Louis Napoleon's present personal appearance is thus described in a late letter from Paris. The personal appearance of Napoleon III would puzzle the most accurate observer of physiognomy. The face of the man with the iron mark was not more devoid of expression than is his. One may study it for hours without deriving the slightest satisfaction as to the Emperor's mental characteristics. Those fishy, rayless eyes, the parchment like cheeks, the stiff, pointed moustache, all suggest a sort of artificial face prepared for the occasion, while the real man, like the priestess of Apollo, lies hidden, and delivers short oracular responses behind it. He is short in stature, though his body is full the average size. Hence he appears to-advantage in a sitting posture. Of late years he has grown somewhat corpulent, like the first Napoleon and the other members of his family. His habits at the present day are said to be simple and regular, pe
Louis Napoleon (search for this): article 9
Louis Napoleon's personal appearance. --Louis Napoleon's present personal appearance is thus described in a late letter from Paris. The personal appearance of Napoleon III would puzzle the most accurate observer of physiognomy. The face of the man with the iron mark was not more devoid of expression than is his. One maLouis Napoleon's present personal appearance is thus described in a late letter from Paris. The personal appearance of Napoleon III would puzzle the most accurate observer of physiognomy. The face of the man with the iron mark was not more devoid of expression than is his. One may study it for hours without deriving the slightest satisfaction as to the Emperor's mental characteristics. Those fishy, rayless eyes, the parchment like cheeks, the stiff, pointed moustache, all suggest a sort of artificial face prepared for the occasion, while the real man, like the priestess of Apollo, lies hidden, and delivere, though his body is full the average size. Hence he appears to-advantage in a sitting posture. Of late years he has grown somewhat corpulent, like the first Napoleon and the other members of his family. His habits at the present day are said to be simple and regular, perhaps necessarily so if the stories told of his early ex
. The personal appearance of Napoleon III would puzzle the most accurate observer of physiognomy. The face of the man with the iron mark was not more devoid of expression than is his. One may study it for hours without deriving the slightest satisfaction as to the Emperor's mental characteristics. Those fishy, rayless eyes, the parchment like cheeks, the stiff, pointed moustache, all suggest a sort of artificial face prepared for the occasion, while the real man, like the priestess of Apollo, lies hidden, and delivers short oracular responses behind it. He is short in stature, though his body is full the average size. Hence he appears to-advantage in a sitting posture. Of late years he has grown somewhat corpulent, like the first Napoleon and the other members of his family. His habits at the present day are said to be simple and regular, perhaps necessarily so if the stories told of his early excesses be true. His appearance on horseback does great credit to his horsemanshi
... 19 20 21 22 23 24