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November, 1863 AD (search for this): chapter 1.18
of the same company, also went above the average. But we lost terribly. Sixty enlisted. men of the First Jersey were killed, wounded, or missing. Colonel Wyndham was wounded, but kept his saddle; Lieutenant-Colonel Broderick and Major Shelmire were killed; Lieutenant Brooks was wounded; Captain Sawyer and Lieutenant Crocker were taken prisoners; and I, as you see, have had to come in at last and refit. The capture of Mission Ridge. The campaign of Chattanooga, in October and November, 1863, was as brilliant as it was brief. It was not the continuous pounding of Vicksburg, the dogged and obstinate fighting, and the terrible slaughter of the battles in Virginia in the spring and summer of 1864; but in dash, in skilful surmounting of obstacles, in brilliant and heroic achievement, it was surpassed by no campaign of the war. Each of its five engagements had something of special merit to entitle it to lasting remembrance; the adroitly managed surprise by which the command of t
October 19th, 1864 AD (search for this): chapter 1.18
guns; the graves of the heroes will have subsided like waves; weary of their troubling, the soldier and his leader will have lain down together; but there, embossed upon the globe, Mission Ridge will stand its fitting monument forever. Sheridan at Middletown. One of the most brilliant actions of the war — indeed, one of the most brilliant of any war of modern times — was that victory which the gallant Sheridan snatched from defeat and disaster at Middletown, Virginia, on the 19th of October, 1864. Three or four times in the military history of the last five hundred years, has an able and skilful commander succeeded in stemming the current of disaster, and turning a defeat into a victory; but it has usually been done either by bringing up reinforcements, and thus staying the progress of the exultant and careless foe, or by suffering a day to intervene between the defeat and the victory; at Marengo, it was the approach of reinforcements which enabled Dessaix to say to the first
at Newark, Ohio. He first attracted the attention of General Rosecrans during a review at Nashville, where he was acting as marker for his regiment. His extreme youth (he is quite small for his age) and intelligent appearance interested the general, and calling him to him he questioned him as to his name, age, regiment, etc. General Rosecrans spoke encouragingly to the young soldier, and told him to come and see him whenever he came where he was. He saw no more of the boy until the end of 1863, when he went to his place of residence — the Burnet House-and found Johnny Clem sitting on his sofa, waiting to see him. Johnny had experienced some of the vicissitudes of war since last they met. He had been captured by Wheeler's cavalry near Bridgeport. His captors took him to Wheeler, who saluted him with- What are you doing here, you d d little Yankee scoundrel? Said Johnny Clem, stoutly: General Wheeler, I an no more a d d scoundrel than you are, sir. Johnny said that the reb
in prison providing him with each article suitable for his purpose, which they possessed. Captain Porter was so emaciated from want of food and the sufferings while in prison, as well as a severe wound which he received at the second Bull Run, that he found much difficulty in walking; but after taking a little exercise daily, and gradually increasing the same, he soon found his strength increasing, and nerved himself to the task of an effort to escape. On the morning of the 29th of last January, accompanied by Major E. L. Bates of the Eighteenth Illinois Volunteers, Captain Porter made his first attempt. He went down to the main entry of the prison and entered the surgeon's room. Here he informed the surgeon that he was attacked with chills, and so deceived this excellent medical gentleman that he gave him medicine for the disease. He next passed down into the room occupied by the commissary, shaved his beard and darkened his eyebrows and hair, thus disguising himself perfectl
of Chattanooga, in October and November, 1863, was as brilliant as it was brief. It was not the continuous pounding of Vicksburg, the dogged and obstinate fighting, and the terrible slaughter of the battles in Virginia in the spring and summer of 1864; but in dash, in skilful surmounting of obstacles, in brilliant and heroic achievement, it was surpassed by no campaign of the war. Each of its five engagements had something of special merit to entitle it to lasting remembrance; the adroitly mana happy christening the glorious ensign received from those artless lips-God's flag! and so it is, How the prisoners escaped prom the Richmond jail-incredible underground work-friendship of Virginia negroes. About the beginning of the year 1864 the officers confined in Libby Prison conceived the idea of effecting their own exchange, and after the matter had been seriously discussed by some seven or eight of them, they undertook to dig for a distance toward a sewer running into a basin.
lose. Narrative of Captain John F. Porter, Jr., Fourteenth New York cavalry-particulars of his escape. Captain John F. Porter, of the Fourteenth New York Cavalry, arrived in New York on Monday night, February 15th, 1864, from Washington, having escaped from Richmond, where he was a prisoner of war. Captain Porter was taken prisoner on the 15th of June, 1863, in the attack on Port Hudson. He was carried to Jackson, and thence conducted to the rebel capital, which he reached on the 29th of June. In Richmond, he was incarcerated in the now famous Libby prison. some two months previous to his escape, Captain Porter determined upon making such an attempt. He then tried to purchase a rebel uniform, but could not get it. At a later date, however, he succeeded in procuring rebel clothing, several brother officers in prison providing him with each article suitable for his purpose, which they possessed. Captain Porter was so emaciated from want of food and the sufferings while in pr
October 18th (search for this): chapter 1.18
valley to Harrisonburg; had fixed the new cavalry general, Rosser, on the 8th of October, and repelled with heavy loss a covert attack made by Early from North mountain, on the 12th of October. Supposing that the rebel general had been sufficiently punished to be willing to remain quiet, General Sheridan made a flying visit to his out-stations along the newly repaired Manassas Gap Railroad, and thence to Washington, from whence he hastened back to his command, and, on the night of the 18th of October, reached Winchester. But Early, restless and dissatisfied with the result of his previous encounters with the gallant cavalry general, was yet determined to try his fortune once more, and learning of his absence, and having received information, which he afterward found to his sorrow was false, that Sheridan had gone with the Sixth Corps to join the Army of the Potomac, he was emboldened to make another attack with, as he conceived, good hope of success. He had himself been reinforc
January 1st (search for this): chapter 1.18
e fell in with a detachment of the Second, Fifth, and Sixth Regular Cavalry, and was by them escorted to Leonardtown. Here the escaped officer was provided with transportation to Point Lookout, where, on reporting to General Manton, he was sent on to Washington. Major Bates, who escaped a few hours previous to Captain Porter, was subsequently recaptured. Captain Porter says that the tunnel by which the last batch of officers made their escape from Libby Prison, was commenced on last New Year's Night. It extended from one of the lower rooms of the prison some two hundred yards into the street, opening on a vacant lot. The youngest soldier in the Army of the Cumberland. At the Caledonian supper in Cincinnati, Ohio, during December, 1863, General Rosecrans exhibited the photograph of a boy who he said was the youngest soldier in the Army of the Cumberland. His name is Johnny Clem, twelve years of age, a member of Company C, 22d Michigan Infantry. His home was at Newark, Ohi
December, 1863 AD (search for this): chapter 1.18
o Washington. Major Bates, who escaped a few hours previous to Captain Porter, was subsequently recaptured. Captain Porter says that the tunnel by which the last batch of officers made their escape from Libby Prison, was commenced on last New Year's Night. It extended from one of the lower rooms of the prison some two hundred yards into the street, opening on a vacant lot. The youngest soldier in the Army of the Cumberland. At the Caledonian supper in Cincinnati, Ohio, during December, 1863, General Rosecrans exhibited the photograph of a boy who he said was the youngest soldier in the Army of the Cumberland. His name is Johnny Clem, twelve years of age, a member of Company C, 22d Michigan Infantry. His home was at Newark, Ohio. He first attracted the attention of General Rosecrans during a review at Nashville, where he was acting as marker for his regiment. His extreme youth (he is quite small for his age) and intelligent appearance interested the general, and calling
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