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Browsing named entities in Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing). You can also browse the collection for 1841 AD or search for 1841 AD in all documents.

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Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Wigger, Winand Michael 1841- (search)
Wigger, Winand Michael 1841- Clergyman; born in New York, Dec. 8, 1841; graduated at St. Francis Xavier College in 1860; studied theology at Seton Hall Seminary, South Orange, N. J., in 1860-62; and Brignoli Sali Seminary, Geneva, 1862-65; ordained in the Roman Catholic Church in 1865; and was assistant president of St. Patrick's Cathedral, Newark, N. J., in 1865-69; rector of St. Vincent's Roman Catholic Church, in Madison, N. J., in 1869-73; of St. John's, in Orange, N. J., in 1874-76; and again at St. Vincent's till 1881, when he was consecrated bishop of Newark. He died in South Orange, N. J., Jan. 5, 1901.
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Wilson, Ida Lewis 1841- (search)
Wilson, Ida Lewis 1841- The American Grace Darling; born in Newport, R. I., in 1841; daughter of Capt. Hosea Lewis, of the Lime Rock Light-house, Newport Harbor. She took up her residence with her parents in the light-house in 1854. As the only means of communication with the city of Newport was by water she soon became an expert rower and swimmer. Since her fifteenth year she has rescued eighteen persons in the adjacent sea, several times at the peril of her own life. In 1879 she was 1841; daughter of Capt. Hosea Lewis, of the Lime Rock Light-house, Newport Harbor. She took up her residence with her parents in the light-house in 1854. As the only means of communication with the city of Newport was by water she soon became an expert rower and swimmer. Since her fifteenth year she has rescued eighteen persons in the adjacent sea, several times at the peril of her own life. In 1879 she was appointed keeper of the lighthouse by Secretary Sherman, who wrote: This appointment is conferred upon you as a mark of my appreciation for your noble and heroic efforts in saving human lives. During the same year General Grant presented her with a subscription boat named the Rescue, and in July, 1881, the Secretary of the Treasury awarded her the gold life-saving medal. She has also received medals from several humane societies. the Rescue was on exhibition at the World's Columbian Expositio
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Winthrop, Robert Charles 1809-1894 (search)
Winthrop, Robert Charles 1809-1894 Statesman; born in Boston, Mass., May 12, 1809, a descendant in the sixth generation from Gov. John Winthrop; graduated at Harvard in 1828; studied law with Daniel Webster; was a member of the Massachusetts legislature, 1836-40, and Robert Charles Winthrop. of Congress. 1841-42, and 1843-50. From 1847 to 1849 he was speaker of the House. He was president of the electoral college of Massachusetts in 1848; and in 1850 was appointed United States Senator to fill the unexpired term of Daniel Webster. He was president of the Massachusetts Historical Society for thirty years, and was highly esteemed as an orator. His public addresses include those at the laying of the corner-stone of the Washington Monument (1848); on the completion of the monument (1885); on the 250th anniversary of the landing of the Pilgrims (1870) : on the Centennial (July 4, 1876), and on the 100th anniversary of the surrender of Cornwallis (1881). Several of his orations
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Wood, Fernando 1812-1881 (search)
Wood, Fernando 1812-1881 Legislator; born in Philadelphia, Pa., June 14, 1812; removed to New York in 1820, and became a shipping merchant; was active in public matters; chairman of the Young Men's Political Organization in New York City in 1839; member of Congress in 1841-43; elected mayor of New York in 1854, 1856, 1859, and 1861; and was again a member of Congress in 1863-65 and 1867-77. He died in Washington, D. C., Feb. 14, 1881. See New York City. The following is the text of Mayor Wood's message of Jan. 6, 1861, in favor of establishing New York City as an independent State. To the Honorable the Common Council: Gentlemen,—We are entering upon the public duties of the year under circumstances as unprecedented as they are gloomy and painful to contemplate. The great trading and producing interests of not only the city of New York, but of the entire country, are prostrated by a monetary crisis; and although similar calamities have before befallen us, it is the fi
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Woodbridge, William 1780-1861 (search)
. 20, 1780; went with his father to Marietta, O., in 1791, being one of the first settlers of the Northwestern Territory; was admitted to the bar in 1806; prosecuting attorney for New London county, O., in 1808-14; made secretary of Michigan Territory by President Madison, and settled in Detroit; member of Congress in 1819-20; judge of the Michigan Supreme Court in 1828-32; governor of Michigan in 1840-41, member of the United States Senate in 1841-47. He died in Detroit, Mich., Oct. 20, 1861.. 20, 1780; went with his father to Marietta, O., in 1791, being one of the first settlers of the Northwestern Territory; was admitted to the bar in 1806; prosecuting attorney for New London county, O., in 1808-14; made secretary of Michigan Territory by President Madison, and settled in Detroit; member of Congress in 1819-20; judge of the Michigan Supreme Court in 1828-32; governor of Michigan in 1840-41, member of the United States Senate in 1841-47. He died in Detroit, Mich., Oct. 20, 1861.
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Woodbury, Levi 1789- (search)
Woodbury, Levi 1789- Jurist; born in Francestown, N. H., Dec. 22, 1789; graduated at Dartmouth College in 1809; admitted to the bar in 1812; chosen clerk of the State Senate in 1816; in the same year was appointed a judge of the superior court. He removed to Portsmouth in 1819, was chosen governor of New Hampshire in 1823; speaker of the House in 1825; United States Senator, 1825; and in 1831 was appointed Secretary of the Navy. He was Secretary of the Treasury from 1834 to 1841, when he was again returned to the United States Senate. In Congress Senator Woodbury was a recognized leader of the Democratic party. In 1845 he was appointed one of the justices of the Supreme Court of the United States, and died while in office, in Portsmouth, N. H., Sept. 4, 1851.
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Wool, John Ellis 1784-1869 (search)
Military officer; born in Newburg, N. Y., Feb. 20, 1784. His early education was meagre, but before he was twenty-one he was owner of a book-store in Troy. Losing his property by fire, he studied law, and on April 15, 1812, entered the army as captain in the 13th United States Infantry, raising a company in Troy. At the battle of Queenston Heights he was severely wounded; and, for gallantry in the battles at and near Plattsburg (Sept. 11, 1813), he was brevetted lieutenant-colonel. In 1841 he became brigadier-general. He had been sent to Europe by the government in 1832 to examine some of the military systems on that continent, and witnessed the siege of Antwerp. In 1846 he organized and disciplined volunteers for the war with Mexico, and in less than six weeks despatched to the seat of war 12,000 men fully armed and equipped. Collecting 3,000 men, he penetrated Mexico to Saltillo, after a march of 900 miles without loss. He selected the ground for the battle of Buena Vist
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Worth, William Jenkins 1794-1849 (search)
March 1, 1794; began life as a clerk in a store at Hudson, and entered the military service, as lieutenant of infantry, in May, 1813. He was highly distinguished in the battles of Chippewa and at Lundy's Lane, in July, 1814, and was severely wounded in the latter contest. He was in command of cadets at West Point from 1820 to 1828, and in 1838 was made colonel of the 8th United States Infantry. He served in the Seminole War from 1840 to 1842, and was in command of the army in Florida in 1841-42. He was brevetted a brigadiergeneral in March, 1842, commanded a brigade under General Taylor in Mexico in 1846, and was distinguished in the capture of Monterey. In 1847-48 he commanded a division, under General Scott, in the capture of Vera Cruz, and in the battles from Cerro Gordo to the assault and capture of the city of Mexico. He was brevetted major-general, and was presented with a sword by Congress, by the States of New York and Louisiana, and by his native county, Columbia. A
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Young, John Russell 1841-1899 (search)
Young, John Russell 1841-1899 Journalist; born in Dowington, Pa., Nov. 20, 1841; received a public school education; became a copy-holder on the Philadelphia Press in 1857; was promoted to reporter, news-editor, Washington correspondent, and, at the outbreak of the Civil War, war correspondent with the Army of the Potomac; and served as such from the battle of Bull Run till the end of the Chickahominy campaign, when illness compelled him to return to Philadelphia. After his recovery he was managing editor of the Press; again went to the war in 1864, and served under General Banks in the Red River campaign; then returned to Philadelphia and resumed editorial charge of the Press. He joined the editorial staff of the New York Tribune in 1865, and was its managing editor in 1866-69, during which time he established the Morning post in Philadelphia, and the Standard in New York; was correspondent for the New York Herald in Europe in 1871-77, when he accompanied ex-President Grant on
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Young men's Christian associations, (search)
Young men's Christian associations, Organizations of young men in the different cities, demanding a profession of Christianity in their active, and good moral character in their associate members, and working by methods in harmony with Christianity for the physical, social, mental, and spiritual improvement of their members, and of young men in general. An organization called Young Men's Christian Association was first formed in London, England, by George Williams, in 1841. The movement extended to the United States and Canada in December, 1851, when societies were formed at Montreal, and Boston, Mass. About twenty-four associations were added during the next two years, and during the next ten years the number reached 200. At the first convention, held in Buffalo, N. Y., June 7, 1854, a confederation was formed, with a central committee, and a yearly convention. This form of affiliation continued till the time of the Civil War. During the war the United States Christian Comm
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