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[Reports of the press Association.] entered according to act of Col in the year 1863, by J. S. Thrasher, in the clerk's office of the District Court of the Confederate States for the Northern District of Georgia. From Northern Virginia. Orange C. H., March 2. --The enemy's Charlottesville raiding party recreased Robinson river into Culpeper county during the night. We captured several prisoners during several skirmishes with their rear guard yesterday. The enemy carried off a good many horses and negroes. This force consisted of about twenty five hundred cavalry, with two pieces of artillery. They burnt the county bridge over the Rivanna river, near Charlottesville. The enemy crossed infantry and artillery at Germana ford yesterday evening. [Second Dispatch.] Orange C. H., March 2. --Matters on the upper end of our lines are quiet. Our loss in the skirmishing yesterday near Madison C. H. was fifteen or twenty killed and wounded, chief
retreat from Charlottesville, the Page Flouring Mill, in the county of Green, and the flouring mill of Gen. R. A. Banks, in the county of Madison. In the latter mill there was, I am told, a large amount of wheat and flour, which was of course destroyed.--Many of the negroes who were carried off by the enemy contrived to effect their escape, and have returned to their masters within our lines. The heavy firing heard here on Thursday a said to have been target firing by the enemy in Culpeper county. A small force of the enemy's infantry crossed at Germania Ford on Friday night, but recrossed to Culpeper on Saturday without engaging any of our forces. Germania is a lower ford, and merely picketed by our cavalry videttes. To show you the spirit of the troops of this army, I have been requested to have published the following, which has been sent me from headquarters: Camp 15th Va Cavalry. Near Orange Court House. 1st February, 1864 The undersigned, members of Co
th was of such a character as to determine the Mayor to remand Edwards, Emory, and Hite, for further examination before the Hustings Court. Doyle was discharged. A similar decision was announced in the case of Ann Page, a free negroes, charged with receiving the above articles, knowing them to have been stolen. Ann Finn and Ellen and Margaret Brown, the first charged with using abusive and threatening language towards James B Smith, and the two latter with being free negroes from Culpeper county, without proper papers, were proven to have been captured in that county some time since by our pickets, but after an examination before a court martial turned loose in Richmond on their "parole of honor." The officer who arrested them testified that their character was of the worst kind, and that the house in which they lived (on Exchange alley) was one of the lowest, most disreputable kind. They claimed protection from the Confederate Government on the ground of being involuntary soj
John M. Botts to the Sanitary Commission. --An autograph letter of Mr. Botts, dated Auburn, Culpeper county, Virginia, and exhibited at the New York Fair, has the following: When I have seen a wounded soldier on the field, I have not stopped to ascertain whether he wore a blue jacket or a gray. It has been enough for me to know that he was a disabled and suffering fellow-creature to secure for him my sympathy and such comforts as I could bestow; and such, I believe, have been the instincts of the United States Sanitary Commission. With this experience, derived from personal observation, I cannot but appreciate the generous, noble, and Christian like object to be effected by the association of which you are an organ, and therefore it affords me pleasure to comply with your request by sending this poor contribution to your autograph letters, concluding with the earnest prayer that the present year may put an end to a conflict which is not only demoralizing the whole country
The War News. The Yankee raid in Culpeper county has proved a ludicrous failure. It appears that a body of seven hundred Yankee cavalry came from Warrenton and reached Rapid Ann station, where the Orange and Alexandria railroad crosses the Rapid Ann river, Sunday morning. They crossed the river there and came as far as Holliday's mill, which they burnt, with a considerable quantity of grain, stored there by the Orange and Alexandria Railroad Company. Here they captured a large number of government horses, which were grazing there. At this point the successful portion of the raid ended. A short distance from the road an engine was seen coming slowly towards them; and after dispatching a party to the station to burn the railroad bridge, the main body of the Yankees proceeded down the road to catch the train. The engineer tried to escape, but, apparently, for want of steam, made a slow business of getting away, and the exultant Yankees had nearly gotten to him, when the dischar
will soon turn in our favor. There were many rumors yesterday of the movements of our army in the Valley, which it might be imprudent to mention until confirmed by official reports. At last accounts, up to yesterday morning the enemy had reached Harrisonburg. This is the county seat of Rockingham, and is situated twenty-four miles north northeast of Staunton. The report that the enemy, in heavy force, composed of infantry, artillery and cavalry — had made their appearance in Culpeper county--proves to be an error. We can only learn that a body of cavalry is hovering about there, probably for purposes of observation. We have some few additional particulars of the fight near Winchester on Monday last. The highest estimate of our loss, from all causes, is from twenty-five hundred to three thousand; while that of the enemy is represented as much heavier, we having used artillery upon them at short range with great effect. Indeed, that the carnage was terrible, may be i
rawford. Mount Crawford is in Rockingham county just north of North river. It is about sixteen miles the other side of Staunton and eight miles this side of Harrisonburg. The raid in Northern Virginia. The raiding party mentioned yesterday as the day before at Russell's Hill, fifteen miles from Gordonsville, has returned without attempting a raid. On the Central road, official dispatches at the War Department report a small force of the enemy's cavalry and some infantry in Culpeper county, who are engaged in rebuilding the bridge at Rappahannock station. The Yankees are again running trains on the road to Rappahannock station. Around Richmond. Yesterday all was quiet. The enemy are busily engaged in strengthening the works they held on Monday. There were several rumors in town during the day of advances in force, &c., on the part of the Yankees, but none of them proved correct. In our report of the defence of Fort Gilme, it should have been stated that the L
Ran away, my servant, Louisa. She is about five feet high; dark complexion; no upper front teeth; she is slow of speech, and does not look up when speaking. She was raised in Culpeper county, Virginia. I will reward any person arresting her, or giving any information that will cause her delivery to the Chief of Police. M. M. Branch, Fifteenth street. ja 23--3t*
Ran Away, my servant, Louisa. She is about five feet high; dark complexion; no upper front teeth; she is slow of speech, and does not look up when speaking. She was raised in Culpeper county, Virginia. I will reward any person arresting her, or giving any information that will cause her delivery to the Chief of Police. M. M. Branch, Fifteenth street. ja 23--3t*
Ran Away, my servant, Louisa. She is about five feet high; dark complexion; no upper front teeth; she is slow of speech, and does not look up when speaking. She was raised in Culpeper county, Virginia. I will reward any person arresting her, or giving any information that will cause her delivery to the Chief of Police. M. M. Branch, Fifteenth street. ja 23--3t*
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