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Browsing named entities in a specific section of Edward Porter Alexander, Military memoirs of a Confederate: a critical narrative. Search the whole document.

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wans, Archer, Pender626 Rodes's9,632Rodes, Colquitt, Ramseur, Doles, Iverson418 Early's8,243Gordon, Hoke, Smith, Hays418 Colston's6,629Paxton, Jones, Warren, Nichols418 900Corps' Reserve Artillery983 4 Divisions35,79519 Brigades27118 600General Reserve Artillery626 Cavalry DIVISIONSSTRENGTHBRIGADESBATTS.guns Stuart2,400Fitzhugh Lee, W. H. F. Lee312 2 Corps, 7 Divisions, 30 Brigades, 56,444 Men, 54 Batteries, 228 Guns Allowing for about 3500 reenforcements during the month of April, Lee's whole force was about 60,000, of whom some 57,000 were infantry and artillery. Of these arms Hooker had about 122,000. Each commander planned to take the initiative. Hooker knew that he had double Lee's infantry, and great superiority in artillery, and he desired only to get at Lee away from breastworks. On April 13 he ordered Stoneman's cavalry upon a raid to Lee's rear, which expedition was to be the opening of his campaign. A rain-storm on the 14th, lasting 36 hours, halted
refuge in his fortified lines on the morning of the 3d. Anderson, with his three remaining brigades, — Wright's, Perry's, and Posey's,—was sent at 4 P. M. to watch that road, and threaten the enemy upon that flank. Two hours after sunrise on the 4th, Heth arrived with three brigades to relieve Anderson, who was now ordered to proceed to Salem Church, about six miles, and report to McLaws, which he did about noon. This sending Anderson to reinforce McLaws might have been done the afternoon before. He would then have been on hand at the earliest hour for the joint attack upon Sedgwick, on the 4th, which is now to be described. The events of the morning of the 4th had been as follows: No communication had been received by Sedgwick from Hooker, and he was still under orders to come to Chancellorsville. But at an early hour, movements of Early's troops were discovered in his rear, and, instead of advancing, Sedgwick had deployed Howe's division perpendicular to the Plank road faci
y, Kane, Greene CavalryPleasontonDavis, Devin522 StonemanAverellSargent, McIntosh GreggKilpatrick, Wyndham 11,544Reserve Brig.Buford 1,610Artillery Reserve1258 2,217Provost Guard210 8 Corps, 23 Divisions, 64 Brigades, 133,711 Men, 74 Batteries, 404 Guns The nearest Confederate return is for March 21. It is not entirely complete for the artillery and cavalry, but, estimating for them, Lee's organization and strength at that date was as follows: 1ST corps, Longstreet's, march 31, 1863 DIVISIONSSTRENGTHBRIGADESBATTS.guns Anderson's8,232Wilcox, Wright, Mahone, Posey, Perry418 McLaws's8,567Wofford, Semmes, Kershaw, Barksdale418 850Corps' Reserve Artillery1036 2 Divisions17,6499 Brigades1872 2D corps, Jackson's A. P. Hill's10,400Heth, Thomas, Lane, McGowans, Archer, Pender626 Rodes's9,632Rodes, Colquitt, Ramseur, Doles, Iverson418 Early's8,243Gordon, Hoke, Smith, Hays418 Colston's6,629Paxton, Jones, Warren, Nichols418 900Corps' Reserve Artillery983 4 Divisio
April, 1863 AD (search for this): chapter 15
movement could be renewed. It was intended that Stoneman should destroy the railroads, which would force Lee to retreat. Stoneman should then harass and delay him as he fell back, pursued by Hooker. Lee's proposed campaign was another invasion; this time of Pa. He could neither attack Hooker, nor even threaten his rear across the Rappahannock. But he could again sweep the Valley and cross the Potomac; and beyond, both Lee and Jackson imagined great possibilities. Between Jan. and April, 1863, Jackson had his chief engineer, Maj. Hotchkiss, prepare a remarkable map of the country from Winchester to the Susquehanna, compiled from county maps of Md., Va., and Pa. It was on a large scale, and noted farmhouses, with names of occupants. It was used by Lee on the Gettysburg campaign, and has been reproduced on smaller scale in the O. R. Atlas, Plate CXVI. Three months later the opportunity offered, and Lee put it to the test; but his great lieutenant, Jackson, was no longer at the
is army was only equalled by the faith of his army in him. The decision to attack was quickly made and preparations begun. Wilcox's brigade was ordered to Banks Ford to hold the position. This precaution was well taken, for after midnight of the 1st, Hooker ordered Reynolds's corps to leave Sedgwick and join the army at Chancellorsville. Reynolds started at sunrise and marched by Banks Ford, where he expected to find a bridge. But, as has been told, Griffin's and Humphreys's divisions, after being within sight on the afternoon of the 1st, had been recalled. Wilcox, at dawn on the 2d, had occupied the trenches. So Reynolds, arriving after sunrise and seeing Confederates in possession, continued his march on the north side, and crossed at United States Ford. Anderson's four remaining brigades, with McLaws's three, were ordered to intrench during the night. Jackson, with his three divisions, his own artillery, and Alexander's battalion of Longstreet's corps, were assigned to m
Reynolds started at sunrise and marched by Banks Ford, where he expected to find a bridge. But, as has been told, Griffin's and Humphreys's divisions, after being within sight on the afternoon of the 1st, had been recalled. Wilcox, at dawn on the 2d, had occupied the trenches. So Reynolds, arriving after sunrise and seeing Confederates in possession, continued his march on the north side, and crossed at United States Ford. Anderson's four remaining brigades, with McLaws's three, were order, which was defended by three regiments of Hays's brigade of Early's division, hurried there by Early on seeing the enemy's preparations. Soon afterward, Wilcox's brigade came to the scene from Banks Ford, where it had been in observation on the 2d. At dawn on the 3d, Wilcox noted that the enemy's pickets on the north side were wearing haversacks, and correctly guessed that the forces opposite were leaving for Chancellorsville. He was preparing to march in the same direction, when a messeng
antry to the front. Tell Maj. Hawks —There was a pause for some moments, and then, calmly, the last words, Let us pass over the river, and rest under the shade of the trees. Jackson's fall left A. P. Hill in command, but Hill was himself soon disabled by a fragment of shell, and sent for Stuart. Rodes ranked Stuart, but the latter was not only best known to the army, but was of great popularity, and Rodes cheerfully acquiesced. His whole career, until his death at Winchester, Sept. 19, 1864, was brilliant, and justifies the belief that he would have proven a competent commander, but, as will be seen, Stuart's conduct, upon this occasion, was notably fine. A little before dark, Stuart, with Jackson's consent, had taken his cavalry and a regiment of infantry and started to attack the camps and trains of the enemy near Ely's Ford. He had reached their vicinity and was forming for the assault, when one of Jackson's staff brought the message of recall. He ordered the command to fi
may have a weak feature. This was the case here. Its right flank rested in the air, and was not even covered by a curtain of cavalry. Hooker, however, was not entirely blind to this weakness of his line. He inspected it early next morning, May 2, and ordered changes and enjoined vigilance which might have saved him from the surprise of the afternoon, had he not, like Pope in his campaign of the previous fall, failed to fathom the boldness of Lee's designs even after discovering the Confehe roadside, watched the head of the column march by, and exchanged with Jackson the last few words ever to pass between them. Rodes's division led the column, Colston's division followed, and A. P. Hill's brought up the rear. The sun rose on May 2 a few minutes after five, and set at 6.50 P. M. The moon was full that night. The march led by a cross-roads near the Catherine Furnace, thence southward for over a mile and then southwestward for two miles before turning west and striking the
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