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edford line, on the west. This land is now known as Wellington. The farm remained a part of the town of Charlestown until 1726,, when it was annexed to Malden, but later set off to Medford. Thomas Blanchard was married twice in England, and married a third wife, Mary——, after coming to New England, his second wife having died on the passage over. Four of his sons came to this country. He died on his farm in Charlestown, May 21, 1654; his widow died at Noddle's Island, now East Boston, in 1676. II. George Blanchard had two wives and ten children; lived on one-half of the farm inherited from his father, and died there March 18, 1700, aged 84. His gravestone is in the Medford burying ground. III. Joseph Blanchard, eldest son of George Blanchard, by his first wife, was born in 1654; married Hannah, daughter of Thomas Shepard of Charlestown, April 13, 1681. He had seven children, and died in Charlestown, on the Blanchard Farm, October 24, 1694, aged 40. His gravestone is in
April 19th (search for this): chapter 1
Regiment, and the Ambulance Corps. December 9, 1897, Capt. James C. D. Clark was elected captain. The company was in good condition, many of its members being former officers of the High School Cadets. In less than two months after Capt. Clark's commission, a war cloud overhung the sky, and orders were given for each man to provide himself with clothing and equipments ready for instant duty, should war be declared. For the third time in the history of the United States, the nineteenth of April brought a call to arms. Again the drums beat for recruits at the High street armory, and those who had heard it nearly forty years before felt like stopping their ears and fleeing from the sound, but the boys, sons and grandsons of the men of ‘61, were full of the same excitement as in the days of the Civil War. Ninety-two names were enrolled in one week. April 29, came the disappointing news that the 5th was not needed, but on May 24, the regiment was ordered to Gloucester for an
October 24th, 1694 AD (search for this): chapter 1
Noddle's Island, now East Boston, in 1676. II. George Blanchard had two wives and ten children; lived on one-half of the farm inherited from his father, and died there March 18, 1700, aged 84. His gravestone is in the Medford burying ground. III. Joseph Blanchard, eldest son of George Blanchard, by his first wife, was born in 1654; married Hannah, daughter of Thomas Shepard of Charlestown, April 13, 1681. He had seven children, and died in Charlestown, on the Blanchard Farm, October 24, 1694, aged 40. His gravestone is in the Medford burying ground. IV. Aaron Blanchard, twin son of Joseph and Hannah (Shepard), was born March 4, 1690; married Sarah——; had twelve children; died at Medford, September 30, 1769 (?) V. Aaron Blanchard, Jr., son of Aaron and Sarah ——, was born in Medford, May 21, 1722; married, 1st, Rebecca Hall of Medford, November 13, 1745. She died November 13, 1749. He married, 2d, Tabitha Floyd, who was born March, 1729, and died July 31, 1775. Hi
January 6th, 1829 AD (search for this): chapter 1
onal Church of West Medford. After her death he married Miss Emma Fuller, daughter of George H. and Nancy Evelina (Blaisdell) Fuller of West Medford. She survives him and three children, viz.: Joseph Nelson Leonard, a member of this society, and Nathaniel Warren and Elizabeth Leonard. He died suddenly at his office in Boston, December 2, 1902, of heart disease. Cleopas Boyd Johnson. Cleopas Boyd Johnson, an honorary member of the Medford Historical Society, was born in Medford, January 6, 1829. His parents were John and Eliza (Mears) Johnson. He was the youngest of four children. He attended private and town schools, and was well liked by his mates. He left the high school early and served an apprenticeship at house carpentering in Medford. Then the family went to Oshkosh, Wisconsin, but after a short time returned to their old home. In those days they travelled via the Erie Canal. On his return he worked in the ship yards of Medford, and in the Navy Yard. When a you
April 29th (search for this): chapter 1
ts ready for instant duty, should war be declared. For the third time in the history of the United States, the nineteenth of April brought a call to arms. Again the drums beat for recruits at the High street armory, and those who had heard it nearly forty years before felt like stopping their ears and fleeing from the sound, but the boys, sons and grandsons of the men of ‘61, were full of the same excitement as in the days of the Civil War. Ninety-two names were enrolled in one week. April 29, came the disappointing news that the 5th was not needed, but on May 24, the regiment was ordered to Gloucester for an eight days tour of duty. As it was not at all certain that the boys would be ordered back to Medford at its close, they were escorted to the cars by the citizens, High School Cadets, and Fire Department. The week was no play-time, for the weather was wet and stormy, and the regiment was exercised in war-time drills. A sharp but unrewarded watch was kept for the Spanish f
May 19th, 1902 AD (search for this): chapter 1
The Lawrence Light Guard.—Continued. by Helen Tilden Wild. [Read before the Medford Historical Society, May 19, 1902.] AS soon as Co. C, 39th Regiment, was dismissed from the United States service, in June, 1865, the members renewed their old associations with the Lawrence Light Guard and resumed regular meetings in the Town Hall the following October. It was suggested that the company join the Lawrence Rifles, but the Light Guard positively refused to do so, and chose the following officers: Capt., I. F. R. Hosea; 1st Lieut., J. Henry Eames; 2d Lieut., Henry A. Ireland, Jr. In May, 1866, the 5th Regiment was inspected at the race course (Mystic Park). Co. E had three officers, fifty-seven men, and fifty-five guns. Fully two-thirds of the company were veterans; about thirty had served with the three years men. In June, 1866, the company began to fit up rooms in Usher's Building. The drill hall was shared with the Lawrence Rifles. At this time, when the Light Guard is a
a different hour and minute from what we anticipated before looking. With this in mind, how shall we define keeping time in Medford in 1700, when the smallest subdivision on the hour dial of the weaver's clock is the quarter of an hour, and furthermore, it never had but one hand, and that the hour hand. What sort of a mess would the men of today make of their work if but five only out of one hundred possessed time-pieces, and these with the hour hand only? The witchcraft trials of Salem, 1692, furnish much evidence as to the temporary use of words of timemeas-urement. They referred to three fixed times; sunrise, noon, and sunset. Parris, the minister at Salem village, notes that on November i, 1691, he called a meeting, For tomorrow an hour and a half before sundown. The entry the next day is, After sunset about seventeen of the brethren met. Owing to the indefiniteness of time, some of these brethren must have wasted at least an hour and a half. Yet their needs seem to have
s the quarter of an hour, and furthermore, it never had but one hand, and that the hour hand. What sort of a mess would the men of today make of their work if but five only out of one hundred possessed time-pieces, and these with the hour hand only? The witchcraft trials of Salem, 1692, furnish much evidence as to the temporary use of words of timemeas-urement. They referred to three fixed times; sunrise, noon, and sunset. Parris, the minister at Salem village, notes that on November i, 1691, he called a meeting, For tomorrow an hour and a half before sundown. The entry the next day is, After sunset about seventeen of the brethren met. Owing to the indefiniteness of time, some of these brethren must have wasted at least an hour and a half. Yet their needs seem to have been satisfied. Each house was sufficient to itself, for it had its water, its fuel, its lights, its stocks of food in the cellar, and a snow storm that to us would be a calamity was to them an inconvenience.
November 14th (search for this): chapter 1
t his promise made to the townspeople, I will look after the health of your boys. In October, 1st Lieut. Neilson was promoted to take command of Co. K, of Braintree; 2d Lieut. Whitney was promoted to his place. As section after section of those camped at Middletown left for the South, the 5th began to be disheartened; but on November 16 they were ordered to march, and took the cars to Greenville, S. C., one step nearer Cuba. Orders to go forward and a visit from the paymaster made November 14 a gala day. The troops were reviewed at Greenville by the mayor, and marched through the town with the band playing Dixie. Captain Clark had preceded the company, and tent floors and cook houses were ready for its advent. Thanksgiving dinner was sent by the Woman's Relief Corps and the Volunteer Aid Association of Medford, not the first or last of generous donations. The boys sent home the message, We have met the Turks and they are ours! Winter in the Sunny South was not what the
February 13th, 1882 AD (search for this): chapter 1
each company must have at least thirty men or be broken. Sergt. Porter was sent home and came back at midnight with fifteen men; ten more came in the morning, and the company was saved. Almost immediately after this muster, the company was reorganized; forty men were dropped from the rolls and new men enlisted to fill their places. Capt. George L. Goodale, now of the United States Army, took command. The reorganization and thirty-first anniversary of the Light Guard was celebrated February 13, 1882, by a banquet. At the next muster the general commanding told Capt. Goodale he had no criticism to make. In 1883, Capt. Goodale resigned, and for a few months Harry J. Newhall commanded, but was succeeded by Joseph E. Clark, formerly lieutenant in Co. H, of Charlestown. Under Capt. Goodale, and during the first term of Capt. Clark, the Light Guard held the front rank for drill and discipline. It was known as the crack company of the 5th Regiment. The company attended the cer
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