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Rutherford B. Hays (search for this): chapter 19
y the Confederate commander. The losses of the Unionists fell heavily upon particular brigades at particular points in the battle. That of the gallant Duryee, for example, returned from the field with not more than twenty men and four colors.--Statement to the author by General Duryee. See also History of Duryee's Brigade, by Franklin B. Hough, page 19. The carnage on the other side also fell on particular brigades. Jackson, in his report, says more than half of the brigades of Lawton and Hays were either killed or wounded, and more than a third of Trimble's; and all the regimental commanders in those brigades, except two, were killed or wounded. With the gloom of that night also ended the conflict known as the battle of Antietam, in which McClellan said (erroneously as to the number of troops) nearly two hundred thousand men and five hundred pieces of artillery were for fourteen hours engaged. McClellan's Report, page 210. Our soldiers slept that night, he said, conquerors on
Joseph K. F. Mansfield (search for this): chapter 19
eral Hooker; the Ninth, of Burnside's command, was under General Reno; the Twelfth was Banks's, which was now under General Mansfield, who had not before taken the field. Porter's corps remained in Washington until the 12th, and did not join the arDoubleday, and attack and turn the Confederate left. Sumner was directed to throw over the stream during the night General Mansfield's corps (Twelfth), and to hold his own (Second) ready to cross early the next morning. Hooker's movement was succeen rested that night on their arms upon the ground they had won from their foe. Mansfield's corps (divisions of Joseph K. F. Mansfield. Williams and Greene) crossed the Antietam during the evening in Hooker's track, and bivouacked on Poffenber of a burying-ground, and the five birds are over the spot at the edge of the woods, in the extreme distance, where General Mansfield was killed. menaced by unflinching Doubleday, withdrew to their original position near the church. Sedgwick, twic
M. D. Graham (search for this): chapter 19
charged the Confederates on the right of Caldwell, that they were repulsed and scattered in great confusion. and a charge of the Confederates directly on Richardson's front was quickly repulsed. The National line was steadily advanced until the foe was pushed back to Dr. Piper's house, near the Sharpsburg road, which formed a sort of citadel for them, and there they made an obstinate stand. Richardson's artillery was now brought up, and while that brave leader was directing the fire of Captain Graham's battery, he was felled by a ball that proved fatal. General Richardson was taken to McClellan's Headquarters (Pry's), where he died after suffering seven weeks. General W. S. Hancock succeeded him in command, when a charge was made that drove the Confederates from Piper's in the utmost confusion, and only the skillful show of strength by a few of his fresh troops prevented a fatal severance of Lee's line. D. H. Hill, in his report, speaking of the struggle at this point, declared
Albert J. Myer (search for this): chapter 19
mner and Hooker, batteries of 24-pounder Parrott guns, commanded by Captains Taft, Langner, and Von Kleizer, and Lieutenant Weaver, were planted. On the crest of the hill, above bridge No. 3, were batteries under Captain Weed and Lieutenant Benjamin. Franklin's corps and Couch's division were farther down in Pleasant Valley, near Brownsville, and Morrell's division of Porter's corps was approaching from Boonsborough, and Humphrey's from Frederick. A detachment of the Signal Corps, under Major Myer, had a station on Red Ridge, a spur of South Mountain, which overlooked the Signal-Station on Red Hills. entire field of operations, and from that point it performed very important service. Such was the general position of the contending armies on the 16th of September. The Confederates opened an artillery fire on the Nationals at dawn, but it was afternoon before McClellan was ready to put his troops in position for attack, the morning having been spent in reconnoitering, finding f
as Sykes's regular division of Porter's corps, protecting bridge No. 2. Farther down the stream, on the left, and not far from No. 3, Burnside's. corps was posted. Upon a ridge of the first line of hills east of Antietam, between the turnpike and Pry's house, and in front of Sumner and Hooker, batteries of 24-pounder Parrott guns, commanded by Captains Taft, Langner, and Von Kleizer, and Lieutenant Weaver, were planted. On the crest of the hill, above bridge No. 3, were batteries under Captain Weed and Lieutenant Benjamin. Franklin's corps and Couch's division were farther down in Pleasant Valley, near Brownsville, and Morrell's division of Porter's corps was approaching from Boonsborough, and Humphrey's from Frederick. A detachment of the Signal Corps, under Major Myer, had a station on Red Ridge, a spur of South Mountain, which overlooked the Signal-Station on Red Hills. entire field of operations, and from that point it performed very important service. Such was the general
T. H. Ford (search for this): chapter 19
hing worthy of a skillful or loyal commander to save his post and garrison below. He had placed a few troops under Colonel T. H. Ford, of the Thirty-second Harper's Ferry. Ohio, These were the Thirty-second Ohio, Thirty-ninth, One Hundred up a rough mountain road to the crest of the Elk Mountain, and to follow the ridge to Ford's position on Maryland Heights. Ford had only a slight breast-work of trees, with an abatis in front of it, near the crest, for defense. He repelled an assaullied, but the Confederates had secured such vantage-ground that, under cover of darkness, at two o'clock the next morning, Ford, hopeless of aid from Miles, spiked his guns and withdrew to Harper's Ferry. All was now lost, unless Miles could hold dered a month before the surrender to fortify Maryland Heights, but had neglected to do so; that he had refused to furnish Ford with intrenching tools; that two days before the surrender he had paroled sixteen Confederate prisoners and allowed them t
Franklin B. Hough (search for this): chapter 19
s on that day at 12,469 men, of whom 2,010 were killed. He estimated the loss of Lee as much greater. No reliable official statement seems to have been made by the Confederate commander. The losses of the Unionists fell heavily upon particular brigades at particular points in the battle. That of the gallant Duryee, for example, returned from the field with not more than twenty men and four colors.--Statement to the author by General Duryee. See also History of Duryee's Brigade, by Franklin B. Hough, page 19. The carnage on the other side also fell on particular brigades. Jackson, in his report, says more than half of the brigades of Lawton and Hays were either killed or wounded, and more than a third of Trimble's; and all the regimental commanders in those brigades, except two, were killed or wounded. With the gloom of that night also ended the conflict known as the battle of Antietam, in which McClellan said (erroneously as to the number of troops) nearly two hundred thousand
John Cochran (search for this): chapter 19
w proceeded to Washington, bearing a general order for instant dismissal from the service of the officers who, as he had ascertained, had made clandestine communications to the President concerning the defection of the troops toward their leader, and for other purposes. These he charged with fomenting The Union Generals. discontent in the army. In that order Generals Hooker, Brooks, and Newton were named for ignominious dismissal from the service, and Generals Franklin, W. F. Smith, Cochran, and Ferrero, and Lieutenant-Colonel J. H. Taylor, were to be relieved from duty in the Army of the Potomac. Generals Franklin and Smith, without the knowledge of Burnside, wrote a joint letter to the President on the 21st of December, expressing their belief that Burnside's plan of campaign could not succeed, and substantially recommending that of McClellan, by the James River and the country on its borders. The President replied that they were simply suggesting a plan fraught with the ol
Castiglione (search for this): chapter 19
e-boxes. The National Guard are pitiful. I have here 4,000 from Angers and Bretagne, in round hats, without cartridge-boxes, but with good weapons; and I have made them tell. There is no money, do you say? But where do you expect to get money but from the pockets of the enemy? You have no teams? Seize them I You have no magazines? Tut, tut, that is too ridiculous! I order you to put yourself in the field twelve hours after you receive this letter. If you are still the Augereau of Castiglione, keep your command. If your sixty years are too much for you, relinquish it to the oldest of your general officers. The country is menaced and in danger. It can only be saved by daring and alacrity, and not by vain delays. You must have a nucleus of 6,000 picked troops. I have not so many; yet I have destroyed three armies, captured 40,000 prisoners, taken 200 pieces of artillery, and thrice saved the capital. The enemy are in full flight upon Troyes? Be before them. Act no longer
Taliaferro (search for this): chapter 19
post ed be tween Hood's right a nd Hamilton's crossing on the railway, his front line under Pen der, Lane, and Archer occupying the edge of a wood. Lieutenant Walker, with fourteen pieces of artillery, was posted near the right, supported by two Virginia regiments, under Colonel Brockenborough. A projecting wood at the front of the general lines was held by Lane's brigade. Hill's reserve was composed of the brigades of Thomas and Gregg, with a part of Field's. The divisions of Early and Taliaferro composed Jackson's second line, and D. H. Hill's was his reserve. The cannon of the latter were well posted so as to command the open ground between the heights and the city. The plain on Jackson's right was occupied by Stuart, with two brigades of cavalry and his horse artillery, and his line extended to Massaponax Creek. Lee's Report, March 6, 1863. A council of officers was held on the evening of the 12th, when Burnside submitted his plan of attack the next morning, which was f
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