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he 7th of March, where a siege train was organized, *consisting of seven batteries of the First Indiana Artillery, two of the Sixth Michigan, and one of Mack's Eighteenth New York. The cavalry marched overland from New Orleans. At the middle of March, every thing was in readiness for an attack on Mobile, with from twenty-five thousand to thirty thousand troops, composed of the Thirteenth and Sixteenth Corps, Knipe's cavalry division, and a brigade of cavalry, a division of infantry, and anothsion of the Mississippi, numbering about twenty-two thousand men and horses, were encamped on the north side of the Tennessee River, at Gravelly Springs and Waterloo, in Lauderdale County, Alabama. These had been thoroughly disciplined, when, in March, 1865. they were prepared for an expedition into Alabama, having for its object co-operation with Canby in the reduction of Mobile, and the capture of important places, particularly Selma, on the Alabama River, where the Confederates had extensi
ances. During that raid he captured five fortified cities, two hundred and eighty-eight pieces of artillery, twenty-three stand of colors, and six thousand eight hundred and twenty prisoners; and he destroyed a vast amount of property of every kind. He lost seven hundred and twenty-five men, of whom ninety-nine were killed. The writer visited the theater of events described in this chapter in the spring of 1866. He arrived at Savannah from Hilton Head See page 488. the first week in April, and after visiting places of historic interest there, left that city on an evening train April 5. for Augusta and farther west. Travel had not yet been resumed, to a great extent. The roads were in a rough condition, the cars were wretched in accommodations, and the passengers were few. The latter were chiefly Northern business men. We arrived at Augusta early in the morning, and after breakfast took seats in a very comfortable car for Atlanta. It was a warm, pleasant day, and the passe
ge of the Department Redoubt and ditch at Mobile. this was the appearance of a portion of the inner line of works, in the suburbs of the city, near Dauphin Street, as it appeared when the writer sketched it in April, 1866. the picket fence indicates the line of Dauphin Street. The movable forces under Canby's command, had been organized into brigades, called the Reserve Corps of the Military Division of the West Mississippi, and numbered about ten thousand effective men. Early in January, 1865. these were concentrated at Kenner, ten miles above New Orleans, and General F. Steele See page 252. was assigned to take command of them. A part of this force was soon afterward sent to Fort Barrancas, in Pensacola Bay, and the remainder followed directly. These, with the addition of seven regiments, and several light batteries, were organized as the Thirteenth Army Corps, comprising three divisions, and General Gordon Granger was assigned to its command. Meanwhile, the Sixtee
ons, and General Gordon Granger was assigned to its command. Meanwhile, the Sixteenth Army Corps (General A. J. Smith), which had assisted in driving Hood out of Tennessee, was ordered to join Canby. It was then cantoned at Eastport. Early in February, it went in transports, accompanied by Knipe's division of cavalry, five thousand strong, by the waters of the Tennessee, Ohio, and Mississippi rivers, to New Orleans, where it arrived on the 21st, February. after a travel of over thirteen hundFebruary. after a travel of over thirteen hundred miles in the space of eleven days. There the corps remained awhile, waiting for the perfection of the arrangements for the expedition under Wilson, The Twenty-ninth and Thirty-third Iowa, Fiftieth Indiana, Twenty-seventh, Twenty-eighth and Thirty-fifth Wisconsin, and Seventy-seventh Ohio. which was to sweep down from the north, through Alabama, simultaneously with Canby's attack on Mobile. The corps finally moved again, and arrived at Fort Gaines, on Dauphin Island, on the 7th of March,
April 10th, 1865 AD (search for this): chapter 19
erals Lidell, Cockerell, and Thomas, and other officers of high rank, and three thousand men, as prisoners of war. The spoils were nearly forty pieces of artillery, four thousand small-arms, sixteen battle-flags, and a vast quantity of ammunition. The Confederates lost, in killed and wounded, about five hundred men. The National loss was about one thousand. The Nationals were now in undisputed possession of the whole eastern shore of the bay. The army and navy spent all the next day April 10, 1865. in careful reconnoitering, preparing for an advance on Mobile. Some of the gun-boats attempted to go up to Blakely, but were checked by a heavy fire from Forts Huger and Tracy. From these island batteries full two hundred shells were thrown at the navy during that and the next day, when, as we have seen, the garrisons of both spiked their guns, and fled in the shadows of night. April 11. Meanwhile the Thirteenth Army Corps had been taken across the bay, for an attack on Mobile, in co
een hundred miles in the space of eleven days. There the corps remained awhile, waiting for the perfection of the arrangements for the expedition under Wilson, The Twenty-ninth and Thirty-third Iowa, Fiftieth Indiana, Twenty-seventh, Twenty-eighth and Thirty-fifth Wisconsin, and Seventy-seventh Ohio. which was to sweep down from the north, through Alabama, simultaneously with Canby's attack on Mobile. The corps finally moved again, and arrived at Fort Gaines, on Dauphin Island, on the 7th of March, where a siege train was organized, *consisting of seven batteries of the First Indiana Artillery, two of the Sixth Michigan, and one of Mack's Eighteenth New York. The cavalry marched overland from New Orleans. At the middle of March, every thing was in readiness for an attack on Mobile, with from twenty-five thousand to thirty thousand troops, composed of the Thirteenth and Sixteenth Corps, Knipe's cavalry division, and a brigade of cavalry, a division of infantry, and another of negr
April 5th, 1865 AD (search for this): chapter 19
s brigade, to Centreville, cross the Cahawba there, and push on by way of Scottsville to assist Croxton in breaking up Jackson's column. McCook found Jackson at Scottsville, well posted, with intrenchments covering his column. Croxton had not come up, and he could hear nothing of him. Feeling too weak to attack the Confederates, he skirmished with them a little, burned a factory at Scottsville, and then fell back. He destroyed the bridge over the Cahawba, at Centreville, and rejoined April 5, 1865. Wildon at Selma. Wilson pushed southward from Randolph with the brigades of Long and Upton, and at-Ebenezer Church, near Boyle's Creek, six miles north of Plantersville, he was confronted by Forrest who had five thousand men behind a strong barricade and abatis. Forrest was straining every nerve to reach and defend Selma, which was one of the most important places in the Confederacy, on account of its immense founderies of cannon and projectiles. Wilson advanced to the attack at on
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