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Browsing named entities in a specific section of George Bancroft, History of the United States from the Discovery of the American Continent, Vol. 2, 17th edition.. Search the whole document.

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e rivers that flow into Albemarle Sound. The company was led by Roger Green, and his services were rewarded by the 1653. July. grant of a thousand acres, while ten thousand acres were offered to any hundred persons who would plant on the banks of t Quaker king, the rival of the ancient philosophers, to whom the world had erected statues. The constitutions were 1669, July. signed on the twenty-first of July, 1669; and a commission as governor was issued to William Sayle. In a second draft church remained for a season; while Miller proceeded to the province, in which he was now to hold the triple office 1677. July of president or governor, secretary, and collector. The government had for about a year been left in Chap XIII.} 1677 the shores of Carolina as the refuge where they were assured of favor. Even Shaftesbury, when he was committed to 1681. July. the Tower, desired leave to expatriate himself, and become an inhabitant of Carolina. Lingard's England, XIII. c. VII
October 22nd (search for this): chapter 3
now sent into Calvinistic districts, to be quartered in Protestant families, and to torment them into conversion. Meantime, emigration was a felony, and the frontiers were carefully guarded to prevent it. The hounds were let loose on game shut up in a close park. Here was an invention which multiplied tyranny indefinitely, and lodged its lustful and ferocious passions under every roof, within the secret recesses of every family. At length, the edict of Nantz was formally revoked. 1685 Oct. 22. Calvinists might no longer preach in churches or in the ruins of churches; all public worship was forbidden them; and the chancellor Le Tellier could shout aloud, Now, Lord, lettest thou thy servant depart in peace; even the eloquent Bossuet, in false rhetoric that reflects disgrace on his understanding Chap. XIII.} and heart, Leurs faux pasteurs, &c. Oralson Fun. de Le Tellier. The insinuation was false. could declare the total overthrow of heresy; while Louis XIV. believed his glo
rvening forests and came upon the rivers that flow into Albemarle Sound. The company was led by Roger Green, and his services were rewarded by the 1653. July. grant of a thousand acres, while ten thousand acres were offered to any hundred persons who would plant on the banks of the Roanoke, or on the south side of the Chowan and its tributary streams. Hening, i. 380, 381. These conditional grants seem not to have taken effect; yet the enterprise of Virginia did not flag; and Thomas Dew, 1656. Dec. once the speaker of the assembly, formed a plan for exploring the navigable rivers still further to the south, between Cape Hatteras and Cape Fear. Ibid. 422. How far this spirit of discovery led to immediate emigration, it is not possible to determine. The county of Nansemund had long abounded in non-conformists; Winthrop, II. 334. Johnson's Wonderw. Prov. B. III. c. XI. and it is certain the first settlements on Albemarle Sound were a result of spontaneous overflowings from
ans formed in England by Sir Robert Heath, or by Lord Maltravers, Heath's assign, were never realized, the desire of extending the settlements to the south still prevailed in Virginia; and twenty years after the excursion of Porey, a company 1642 Jan. that had heard of the river that lay south-west of the Appomattox, petitioned, and soon obtained leave of the 1643 Virginia legislature to prosecute the discovery, under the promise of a fourteen years monopoly of the profits. Hening, i. 262. d condition. South Carolina was a scene of turbulence till the constitutions were abandoned; and industry was unproductive till the colonists despised patronage and relied on themselves. It was in January, 1670, more than a month before 1670. Jan. the revised Model was signed, a considerable number of emigrants set sail for Carolina, which, both from climate and soil, was celebrated in advance as the beauty and envy of North America. Talbot, in dedication of Lederer. They were conducted
r discovery; and the sons of Governor Yeardley Thurloe, II. 273, 274. Letter of Francis Yeardley to John Farrar. wrote to England with exultation, that the northern country of Carolina had been explored by Virginians born. We are not left to conjecture, who of the inhabit- Chap. XIII.} ants of Nansemund of that day first traversed the intervening forests and came upon the rivers that flow into Albemarle Sound. The company was led by Roger Green, and his services were rewarded by the 1653. July. grant of a thousand acres, while ten thousand acres were offered to any hundred persons who would plant on the banks of the Roanoke, or on the south side of the Chowan and its tributary streams. Hening, i. 380, 381. These conditional grants seem not to have taken effect; yet the enterprise of Virginia did not flag; and Thomas Dew, 1656. Dec. once the speaker of the assembly, formed a plan for exploring the navigable rivers still further to the south, between Cape Hatteras and Cape
ey, we hope to find more facile people than the New England men. Yet they intrusted the affair entirely to Sir William's management. He was to get settlers as cheaply as possible; yet at any rate to get settlers. Like Massachusetts, Virginia was the mother of a Chap XIII.} cluster of states; like the towns of New England, the plantations of Virginia extended along the sea. The country on Nansemund River had been settled as early as 1609; in 1622, the adventurous Porey, then secre- 1622. Feb. tary of the Old Dominion, travelled over land to the South River, Chowan, and, on his return, celebrated the kindness of the native people, the fertility of the country, and the happy climate, that yielded two harvests in each year. Smith's Virginia, II. 64. If no immediate colonization ensued, if the plans formed in England by Sir Robert Heath, or by Lord Maltravers, Heath's assign, were never realized, the desire of extending the settlements to the south still prevailed in Virginia; and
ich I dare trust, older than 1662. before the restoration. At that period, men who were impatient of interference, who dreaded the enforcement of religious conformity, who distrusted the spirit of the new government in Virginia, plunged more deeply into the forests. It is known that, in 1662, the chief of the Yeopim Indians granted to George Durant Winthrop, II. 334, speaks of Mr. Durand, of Nansemund, elder of a Puritan very orthodox church, in that county, and banished from Virginia in 1648, by Sir William Berkeley. Were the exile and the colonist in any way connected? the neck of land which still bears his name; Mss. communicated by D. L. Swain, governor of North Carolina, in 1835. and, in the Chap XIII.} 1663 April 1. following year, George Cathmaid could claim from Sir William Berkeley a large grant of land upon the Sound, as a reward for having established sixty-seven persons in Carolina. Mss. from D. L. Swain. This may have been the oldest considerable settlement;
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