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Browsing named entities in a specific section of Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 17. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones). Search the whole document.

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convention of Arkansas, which on the 18th of March had refused to adopt an ordinance of secession by a vote of 35 to 39, assembled again on the 6th of May and passed that ordinance by a vote of 69 to 1. In North Carolina, which had refused in February to call a convention, one was called immediately upon the appearance of the proclamation, which met on the 20th of May and passed an ordinance of secession the following day. In Tennessee, which had refused to call a convention in February, the February, the people ratified an ordinance of secession on the 24th of June by a vote of 104,019 to 47,238, as announced by the Governor. In the Virginia convention, which had refused to adopt an ordinance of secession on the 4th of April, 1861, by a vote of 89 to 45, and which as late as the 11th of April had refused to adopt a conditional declaration in favor of secession, on the 17th of April an ordinance of secession was adopted by a vote of 88 to 55, and the majority vote was afterwards increased to 91.
January 1st (search for this): chapter 1.12
aged by the Federal Government for the overthrow of African slavery, and by the South for the maintenance of that institution. But incalculable as is the benefit of that consequence of the war, if we may put faith in the solemn acts and declarations of the Federal Government it is easy to show that it did not make war to emancipate the slaves, but that it liberated the slaves to help it to make war. President Lincoln's proclamation of September 22, 1862, declares: That on the first day of January, in the year of our Lord one thousand eight hundred and sixty-three, all persons held as slaves in any State, or designated part of a State, the people whereof shall then be in rebellion against the United States, shall be then, thenceforward, and forever free; and the Executive Government of the United States, including the military and naval authority thereof, will recognize and maintain the freedom of such persons, and will do no act or acts to repress such persons, or any of them,
January 11th (search for this): chapter 1.12
took effect by the action of the convention alone. In Georgia a strong minority opposed the measure to the last, and a test resolution, declaring it to be the right and duty of Georgia to secede, passed the convention on the 18th of January, 1861, by a vote of only 165 to 130, and, after the adoption of this resolution, the ordinance of secession was opposed the next day by 89 members against 208 voting in favor of it. In Alabama the ordinance was adopted by the convention on the 11th of January by a vote of 61 to 39. In Florida the ordinance was adopted on the 10th of January, 1861, by a vote of 62 to 7, but was not submitted to the people. In Mississippi the ordinance was adopted on the 9th of January, 1861, by a vote of 84 to 15, and was not submitted to the people. In Louisiana the ordinance was adopted in convention on the 25th of January, 1861 by a vote of 113 to 17, the convention refusing to submit it to the people by a vote of 84 to 45. In Texas the ordina
August 16th, 1864 AD (search for this): chapter 1.12
incidents con-16 nected with General Lee, he would be glad to furnish me with one which had occurred under his own observation, and which he thought ought to be told, and at my request he narrated the following circumstance. That I may not detract from its interest, I will him tell it in his own simple way: Dear Sir,—Yours of late date received and contents noted. The information about the late lamented General Lee, which I wish to communicate to you, is as follows: On the 16th of August, 1864, I was engaged in battle with the Confederate army. I belonged to the Tenth corps, United States army, General Foster commanding division. About 1 o'clock, afternoon, the enemy drove us before them. Before that we had gained several lines of pits, &c., but at that time they swept down upon us, carrying all before them. We fought as brave as we could, but it was of no avail. I thought at the time that it had taken a sudden turn and could not account for it. I was taken prisoner wi
e of the existence of free government. This sacrifice they were required to make to enable Mr. Lincoln to accomplish the objects of his proclamation, one of which, as I have shown, had been declared to be unlawful by the Supreme Court of the United States, and the others were so vague that the border States themselves might be embraced within their scope. Their resolution was quickly taken upon the question thus suddenly forced upon them. The convention of Arkansas, which on the 18th of March had refused to adopt an ordinance of secession by a vote of 35 to 39, assembled again on the 6th of May and passed that ordinance by a vote of 69 to 1. In North Carolina, which had refused in February to call a convention, one was called immediately upon the appearance of the proclamation, which met on the 20th of May and passed an ordinance of secession the following day. In Tennessee, which had refused to call a convention in February, the people ratified an ordinance of secession o
refused to adopt an ordinance of secession by a vote of 35 to 39, assembled again on the 6th of May and passed that ordinance by a vote of 69 to 1. In North Carolina, which had refused in February to call a convention, one was called immediately upon the appearance of the proclamation, which met on the 20th of May and passed an ordinance of secession the following day. In Tennessee, which had refused to call a convention in February, the people ratified an ordinance of secession on the 24th of June by a vote of 104,019 to 47,238, as announced by the Governor. In the Virginia convention, which had refused to adopt an ordinance of secession on the 4th of April, 1861, by a vote of 89 to 45, and which as late as the 11th of April had refused to adopt a conditional declaration in favor of secession, on the 17th of April an ordinance of secession was adopted by a vote of 88 to 55, and the majority vote was afterwards increased to 91. The change in the feeling of the people of Kentucky
April 4th, 1861 AD (search for this): chapter 1.12
manent disruption of the Union. The records of the convention abound with evidence of the devotion of the great body of its members to the Union, and of their earnest efforts to avert a resort to force as a means of preserving it. As late as April 4, 1861, the convention refused to submit an ordinance of secession to the people for their approval by a vote of 45 for to 80 against the proposition. On the 6th of April the convention rejected a resolution declaring that Virginia considered that onvention in February, the people ratified an ordinance of secession on the 24th of June by a vote of 104,019 to 47,238, as announced by the Governor. In the Virginia convention, which had refused to adopt an ordinance of secession on the 4th of April, 1861, by a vote of 89 to 45, and which as late as the 11th of April had refused to adopt a conditional declaration in favor of secession, on the 17th of April an ordinance of secession was adopted by a vote of 88 to 55, and the majority vote was
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