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go, of the regular army, who had performed gallant service in the battles of Belmont and Fort Donelson. The former fell at the head of his company, while his regiment was maintaining the terrible contest in front of Fort Magruder, in the afternoon of the 5th of May. He had just given the words for an assault, Boys, follow me I forward, march! when he fell, and soon expired. Lieutenant De Wolf was in charge of a battery of Gibson's Flying Artillery in the advance toward Williamsburg on the 4th, and in the encounter in which Stoneman and his followers were engaged with the Confederate cavalry on the day before the battle, and while valiantly doing his duty, he was severely wounded. Typhoid fever supervened, and he died a month later at Washington city. It would be a delightful task to record the names of all the brave who thus perished for their country, but we may only speak of one or two now and then as examples of true patriots and representatives of the Army of Liberty. appear
c. One was in the Mountain Department, under Fremont; another in the Department of the Shenandoah, under Banks; and a third in the newly created Department of the Rappahannock, under McDowell. At about the time of the siege of Yorktown, early in April, General Fremont was at Franklin, in Pendleton County, over the mountains west of Harrisonburg, with fifteen thousand men; General Banks was at Strasburg, in the Valley, with about sixteen thousand; and General McDowell was at Fredericksburg, on his purpose Shields's division was detached from Banks's command and given to McDowell, making the force of the latter about forty-one thousand men and one hundred guns. Such was the disposition of the National forces in Virginia at the close of April, when Stonewall Jackson, who, as we have observed, was driven up the Shenandoah Valley after his defeat by Shields at Kernstown, again commenced offensive operations. Jackson remained a few days at Mount Jackson, after his flight from Winchest
00. passage of the Blue Ridge, 401. General McCLELLAN'S batteries would all have been ready to open on the Confederate works on the morning of the 6th of May; 1862. but there was then no occasion for their use, for those works were abandoned. So early as the 30th of April, Jefferson Davis and two of his so-called cabinet, ange with Colonel George Washington were performed. That ancient house, then so honored, had been destroyed about thirty years before, and the one standing there in 1862 was only a modern structure bearing the ancient title. It was occupied, when the war broke out, by a son of Robert E. Lee. The wife and some of the family of Leefor cavalry to reap a richer harvest of the fruits of victory. After menacing Harper's Ferry, where General Rufus Saxton was in command, Jackson began May 80, 1862. as hasty a retreat up the Valley as Banks had made down it, for he was threatened with immediate peril. General Shields, as we have observed, had been ordered to
tia engaged in the siege, it was bombarded and the British General was driven out. When the writer visited Yorktown in 1848, the walls of that house exhibited scars made by the American shells and round shot on that occasion. When he was there in 1866 the house, which had survived two sieges more than eighty years apart, was still well preserved, and the scars made in the old War for Independence were yet visible. At his first visit he found the grave-yard attached to the old Parish Church in elson House (in which two or three generations of the Nelson family were buried), in excellent condition. there being several fine monuments over the graves of leading members of that family; but at his last visit that cemetery Parish Church in 1866. was a desolation-those monuments were mutilated, and the place of the steeple of the Church (which the Confederates used for a quarter-master's depot, and whose walls and roof only were preserved) was occupied by a signal-tower, erected by Magru
May 10th, 1862 AD (search for this): chapter 16
had ordered a large portion of the troops in hand to the right, under Hancock, to keep the Confederates in check in that direction, and to flank the works if possible. History will not be believed, said Hooker, in his report of the battle (May 10, 1862), when it is told that my division were permitted to carry on this unequal struggle from morning until night unaided, in the presence of more than 80,000 of their comrades with arms in their hands. Nevertheless it is true. So he fought on, ighth Pennsylvania; one hundred mounted riflemen; Follet's battery of light artillery, and Howard's battery. under the immediate command of Brigadier-general Max Weber, were in readiness for debarkation at Ocean View, and early in the morning May 10, 1862. a landing was effected unopposed, under the direction of Colonel Cram. The water was so shallow that the troops were compelled to pass ashore on platforms laid on old canal barges. The entire movement was successful; and at eight o'clock in
on. The Merrimack had been ordered to Yorktown, but it had so great a dread of the watchful little Monitor that it remained at Norfolk. Already some war-vessels, and a fleet of transports with Franklin's troops, as we have observed, were lying securely in Posquotin River, well up toward Yorktown. These considerations caused immediate action on the resolutions of the council. The sick, hospital stores, ammunition, and camp equipage were speedily sent to Richmond, and on the night of the 3d of May, the Confederate garrisons at Yorktown and Gloucester, and the troops along the line of the Warwick, fled toward Williamsburg. Early the next morning May 4. General McClellan telegraphed to the Secretary of War that he was in possession of the abandoned post, and added: No time shall be lost. I shall push the enemy to the wall. Yorktown presented to the victors evidences of great precipitation in the final departure of the troops, as well as deliberate preparation for a diabolical re
ls, and a fleet of transports with Franklin's troops, as we have observed, were lying securely in Posquotin River, well up toward Yorktown. These considerations caused immediate action on the resolutions of the council. The sick, hospital stores, ammunition, and camp equipage were speedily sent to Richmond, and on the night of the 3d of May, the Confederate garrisons at Yorktown and Gloucester, and the troops along the line of the Warwick, fled toward Williamsburg. Early the next morning May 4. General McClellan telegraphed to the Secretary of War that he was in possession of the abandoned post, and added: No time shall be lost. I shall push the enemy to the wall. Yorktown presented to the victors evidences of great precipitation in the final departure of the troops, as well as deliberate preparation for a diabolical reception of the Nationals after the flight of the garrison. The Confederates left most of their heavy guns behind them, all of which were spiked. They also lef
regular army, who had performed gallant service in the battles of Belmont and Fort Donelson. The former fell at the head of his company, while his regiment was maintaining the terrible contest in front of Fort Magruder, in the afternoon of the 5th of May. He had just given the words for an assault, Boys, follow me I forward, march! when he fell, and soon expired. Lieutenant De Wolf was in charge of a battery of Gibson's Flying Artillery in the advance toward Williamsburg on the 4th, and in tdrawal of Shields's division. Jackson was watching Banks closely, with orders to hold him, while General Lee, with a strong column, should push beyond the Rappahannock to cut off the communication between Winchester and Alexandria, On the 5th of May Lee wrote to Ewell that he had ordered North Carolina troops to report to him at Gordonsville, and said: I desire that those troops shall not be drawn to Swift Run Gap unless your necessities require it, the object being to form a strong column
ester, 393. Banks's retreat to the Potomac Jackson hastens up the Shenandoah Valley, 394. an exciting race in that Valley Jackson and Ewell hard pressed, 395. battle of Cross Keys, 396. map of operations in Upper Virginia, 398. battle of Port Republic and escape of Jackson's Army, 399. a visit to the Shenandoah region Weyer's Cave, 400. passage of the Blue Ridge, 401. General McCLELLAN'S batteries would all have been ready to open on the Confederate works on the morning of the 6th of May; 1862. but there was then no occasion for their use, for those works were abandoned. So early as the 30th of April, Jefferson Davis and two of his so-called cabinet, and Generals Johnston, Lee, and Magruder, held a council at the Nelson House, This was a large brick house in Yorktown, which belonged to Governor Nelson, of Virginia, and was occupied by Cornwallis as Headquarters during a part of the period of the siege of that post in 1781, when, at the instance of the owner, who was i
May 6th, 1862 AD (search for this): chapter 16
forces along the roads which the latter traveled with such celerity. They were safely encamped under the shelter of the fortifications around Richmond before he was ready to move forward from Williamsburg. On the morning after the battle May 6, 1862, the National troops took possession of Williamsburg, and General McClellan, from the house of Mr. Vest, Johnston's late Headquarters, telegraphed to the Secretary of War a brief account of the events of the previous day, and concluded with thuch. Franklin's long waiting division was not dispatched for that purpose until the day of the battle at Williamsburg, when it was debarked at Yorktown and re-embarked. It arrived at the head of York that night, and on the following morning May 6, 1862. Newton's brigade landed and took position on a plain of a thousand acres of open land, on the right bank of the Pamunkey, one of the streams that form the York river. These are the Pamunkey and the Mattapony. Strictly speaking, these stre
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