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Browsing named entities in Historic leaves, volume 4, April, 1905 - January, 1906.

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May 20th, 1779 AD (search for this): chapter 4
harlestown, near the ponds. He was, perhaps, the son or grandson of Daniel and Mary (Converse) Reed; the son was born February 19, 1732. In February, 1778, Walter Russell was acting as town clerk, a position which he did not hold long, as, May 20, 1779, we read that Samuel Swan was serving in that capacity. The last time we find Mr. Russell's name associated with school affairs was in 1780 (already referred to as the year of greatly-inflated values), when the district under his management rchools within and without the Neck. 1776, ‘77, John Hay, Timothy Tufts, Walter Russell, Samuel Gardner; £ 60 (for all the schools). May 11, 1778, Caleb Call, Samuel Tufts, Samuel Gardner, Philemon Russell; £ 140 (for all the schools). May 20, 1779, Samuel Tufts, Samuel Gardner, Amos Warren; £ 500 (for all the schools). [Committee within the Neck, Nathaniel Gorham, Eben Breed, David Wood.] May 8, 1780. The selectmen, with Samuel Gardner, a committee to regulate the schools; £ 6,400<
January 24th, 1737 AD (search for this): chapter 4
In February, 1778, Walter Russell was acting as town clerk, a position which he did not hold long, as, May 20, 1779, we read that Samuel Swan was serving in that capacity. The last time we find Mr. Russell's name associated with school affairs was in 1780 (already referred to as the year of greatly-inflated values), when the district under his management received £ 317 8s 6d of the £ 6,400 appropriated for schools! Walter Russell, son of Joseph and Mary (Robbins) Russell, was born January 24, 1737, and died at the early age of fortyfive, March 5, 1782. For his second wife, the mother of his children, he married Hannah Adams (Historic Leaves, Vol. III., p. 89). Dr. Paige, the historian of Cambridge, says that Joseph Russell, the father, lived on the north side of the main road in Menotomy, on the first estate west from the river (Alewife brook), but in 1730 exchanged estates with Captain Samuel Whittemore, and removed into the borders of Charlestown, now Somerville, where his h
December 6th, 1784 AD (search for this): chapter 4
was James Gardner, who received, through Collector Hawkins, pay for his services, August, 1786. We have mentioned the name of Amos Warren. He was serving in 1779, and again in 1784. August 2, 1784, Amos Warren and Samuel Gardner are allowed to keep tavern. We are justified in concluding that, previous to 1786, there was no public school building in these two districts. Several references to private quarters that were hired for school purposes are found upon the town records. December 6, 1784. Voted that the school at the upper end of the town be placed at Mr. Samuel Swan's, he to board the master at six shillings per week, and find a room for the school. Voted to give Samuel Gardner five shillings a week to board Ruth Jones to December, 1785 (see Historic Leaves, Vol. III., p. 68). December 14, 1785. The school kept at Phebe Russell's received £ 8 8s. May 4, 1785. Voted to give Coll. N. Hawkins for school kept at John Swan's £ 10 16s. In the warrant (February
December, 1785 AD (search for this): chapter 4
n. We are justified in concluding that, previous to 1786, there was no public school building in these two districts. Several references to private quarters that were hired for school purposes are found upon the town records. December 6, 1784. Voted that the school at the upper end of the town be placed at Mr. Samuel Swan's, he to board the master at six shillings per week, and find a room for the school. Voted to give Samuel Gardner five shillings a week to board Ruth Jones to December, 1785 (see Historic Leaves, Vol. III., p. 68). December 14, 1785. The school kept at Phebe Russell's received £ 8 8s. May 4, 1785. Voted to give Coll. N. Hawkins for school kept at John Swan's £ 10 16s. In the warrant (February 28, 1785) for the coming town meeting, we find the following: To know the minds of the town, what they will do with regard to two petitions presented by the people at the upper end of the town requesting that one or two schoolhouses may be built there. March
December 14th, 1785 AD (search for this): chapter 4
here was no public school building in these two districts. Several references to private quarters that were hired for school purposes are found upon the town records. December 6, 1784. Voted that the school at the upper end of the town be placed at Mr. Samuel Swan's, he to board the master at six shillings per week, and find a room for the school. Voted to give Samuel Gardner five shillings a week to board Ruth Jones to December, 1785 (see Historic Leaves, Vol. III., p. 68). December 14, 1785. The school kept at Phebe Russell's received £ 8 8s. May 4, 1785. Voted to give Coll. N. Hawkins for school kept at John Swan's £ 10 16s. In the warrant (February 28, 1785) for the coming town meeting, we find the following: To know the minds of the town, what they will do with regard to two petitions presented by the people at the upper end of the town requesting that one or two schoolhouses may be built there. March 7 it was voted that two schools be built agreeably to, this
May 4th, 1785 AD (search for this): chapter 4
and find a room for the school. Voted to give Samuel Gardner five shillings a week to board Ruth Jones to December, 1785 (see Historic Leaves, Vol. III., p. 68). December 14, 1785. The school kept at Phebe Russell's received £ 8 8s. May 4, 1785. Voted to give Coll. N. Hawkins for school kept at John Swan's £ 10 16s. In the warrant (February 28, 1785) for the coming town meeting, we find the following: To know the minds of the town, what they will do with regard to two petitions p of the schools. May 6, 1782. The selectmen and Edward Gardner; £ 120 (for all the schools). May 12, 1783 (outside), Timothy Tufts, Philemon Russell, Amos Warren; £ 125 (for all schools). May 10, 1784, the selectmen (same amount). May 4, 1785, the selectmen; £ 180 (for all schools). May 15, 1786, the selectmen and Seth Wyman; £ 185 (for all schools). May, 1787, the selectmen, Seth Wyman, William Whittemore (same amount). May 26, 1788, the selectmen, Philemon Russell, Seth <
February 28th, 1785 AD (search for this): chapter 4
6, 1784. Voted that the school at the upper end of the town be placed at Mr. Samuel Swan's, he to board the master at six shillings per week, and find a room for the school. Voted to give Samuel Gardner five shillings a week to board Ruth Jones to December, 1785 (see Historic Leaves, Vol. III., p. 68). December 14, 1785. The school kept at Phebe Russell's received £ 8 8s. May 4, 1785. Voted to give Coll. N. Hawkins for school kept at John Swan's £ 10 16s. In the warrant (February 28, 1785) for the coming town meeting, we find the following: To know the minds of the town, what they will do with regard to two petitions presented by the people at the upper end of the town requesting that one or two schoolhouses may be built there. March 7 it was voted that two schools be built agreeably to, this petition. The committee appointed for this purpose were Mr. Samuel Gardiner, Mr. William Whittemore, Coll. Nathaniel Hawkins, Lieut. Samuel Cutter, and Mr. Seth Wyman. These ge
June 3rd, 1788 AD (search for this): chapter 4
it was voted to allow Captain Cordis's account for building the schoolhouses without the Neck, £ 80. The following November Messrs. Whittemore and Philemon Russell were empowered to lay a floor, make seats, and lay a hearth at the Russell's school. We believe this was the first time in the history of Charlestown that a school building was designated, although unofficially, by the name of a person or family. A few references to these schools, though trifling, may not be out of place. June 3, 1788, Mr. Russell receives an order for work at the school, £ 2 9s 10d, and Seth Wyman for wood, £ 1 12s. In October Mr. Whittemore's bill for work at the school amounted to £ 3 5s 6d. April 4, 1791, Mr. Russell's bill for cutting and carting wood to the school No.. 3 and repairs amounts to £ 2 19s. The next April, for furnishing three and one-half cords of wood to their respective schools, Mr. Russell receives £ 3 9s, and Mr. Wyman £ 4 4s. This makes the price of wood (delivered), in the time
April 4th, 1791 AD (search for this): chapter 4
, make seats, and lay a hearth at the Russell's school. We believe this was the first time in the history of Charlestown that a school building was designated, although unofficially, by the name of a person or family. A few references to these schools, though trifling, may not be out of place. June 3, 1788, Mr. Russell receives an order for work at the school, £ 2 9s 10d, and Seth Wyman for wood, £ 1 12s. In October Mr. Whittemore's bill for work at the school amounted to £ 3 5s 6d. April 4, 1791, Mr. Russell's bill for cutting and carting wood to the school No.. 3 and repairs amounts to £ 2 19s. The next April, for furnishing three and one-half cords of wood to their respective schools, Mr. Russell receives £ 3 9s, and Mr. Wyman £ 4 4s. This makes the price of wood (delivered), in the time of our first president, from five to six dollarsper cord. January 5, 1789: Voted that the school money for the past year be divided according to the taxes, and that Nathaniel Hawkins, Samue<
June 28th, 1764 AD (search for this): chapter 4
t the school money for the past year be divided according to the taxes, and that Nathaniel Hawkins, Samuel Swan, Esq., and Philemon Russell be a committee to make division accordingly. Benjamin Hurd, Jr., & Seth Wyman were added to this committee. October 19, 1789. Voted that Coll. Hawkins, Philemon Russell, and Seth Wyman provide masters for the schools outside the Neck. Philemon Russell, youngest son of Joseph, and brother of Walter Russell, was born August 1, 1740, and married June 28, 1764, Elizabeth Wyman, who survived her husband many years, and died in 1825. The many references we have made to his name show that he was active in town affairs, and particularly interested in the schools. We shall have occasion to refer to him and his son, Philemon R. Russell, in our next period. He was licensed as a victualler, was employed by the town as a surveyor, and lived in the house which stood on the spot where his grandson, Levi Russell, erected a more modern structure, which
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