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February, 1651 AD (search for this): chapter 1
1835 to 1850, the custom was almost universal. After the fire in 1850, most of the buildings destroyed were replaced by cheaper structures, many of which are still in existence. The Tufts lot, corner of South and Main streets, remained vacant for many years. Finally, the Central Engine House was built there. Ancestry of Aaron Blanchard, periwig-maker. I. Thomas Blanchard, the emigrant, came from Hampshire, England, in 1639. He lived in Braintree, Mass., from 1646 to 1651. In February, 1651, he bought of Rev. John Wilson, Jr., pastor of the church in Dorchester, a house and farm of two hundred acres in Charlestown, lying on the north side of Mystic river, and between Malden river on the east, and the Cradock farm, or Medford line, on the west. This land is now known as Wellington. The farm remained a part of the town of Charlestown until 1726,, when it was annexed to Malden, but later set off to Medford. Thomas Blanchard was married twice in England, and married a third
November 16th (search for this): chapter 1
here, for the Doctor Captain watched his men so closely that minor ills were cured before they developed into anything serious. All through the campaign he kept his promise made to the townspeople, I will look after the health of your boys. In October, 1st Lieut. Neilson was promoted to take command of Co. K, of Braintree; 2d Lieut. Whitney was promoted to his place. As section after section of those camped at Middletown left for the South, the 5th began to be disheartened; but on November 16 they were ordered to march, and took the cars to Greenville, S. C., one step nearer Cuba. Orders to go forward and a visit from the paymaster made November 14 a gala day. The troops were reviewed at Greenville by the mayor, and marched through the town with the band playing Dixie. Captain Clark had preceded the company, and tent floors and cook houses were ready for its advent. Thanksgiving dinner was sent by the Woman's Relief Corps and the Volunteer Aid Association of Medford, not
May 5th, 1874 AD (search for this): chapter 1
osea resigned January 30, 1874. Steps were immediately taken toward consolidation with the Lawrence Rifles. The conference committee agreed that the new company should be called Co. E, 5th Regt., M. V. M., and should bear the name Lawrence Light Guard, but that the captain and 1st lieutenant of the Rifles, Warren W. Manning and Fred. W. Dorr, should head the new organization. Lieut. Jophanus H. Whitney, of the Light Guard, was made 2d lieutenant. The consolidated company was organized May 5, 1874. Lieut. Dorr resigned the following September, and J. H. Whitney and Charles M. Green were commissioned 1st and 2d lieutenants. Capt. Manning resigned in 1876, and J. H. Whitney became captain. Rifle practice was inaugurated during his term of service. Through a combination of circumstances, the interest in the State militia began to wane about 1880, and the Light Guard suffered with the whole. In 1881, it is recorded under the date of September 6, the celebrated yellow day, that e
April 4th (search for this): chapter 1
Saturday evening course of lectures for 1903 offers an attractive set of topics. Last month Mr. Walter C. Wright read a paper on the Gypsy Moth: Past, Present and Future, describing the habits of the pest and the most effective way of ridding the city of its ravages. He placed great responsibility on individual occupants of real estate, who might, by conscientious work, keep the moth in check on private property, while the State and City could be fully occupied in taking care of the trees in reservations, parks and highways. The following papers will be given during the winter and spring:— January 3.—Some Evils of our present Nominating System, and how they can be removed. Hon. F. W. Dallinger, of Cambridge. February 7.—Matthew Cradock. Mr. W. K. Watkins, of Malden. March 7.—How can we make Medford more beautiful? Mr. Edward P. Adams. April 4.—The Second Charter of Massachusetts. Mr. Walter H. Cushing. May 2.—Spot Pond, as it was and is. Mr. Herbert
rs, we must conclude without doubt that time-pieces were rare in Medford in the early decades of 1700, and that the appearance of a clock, seen in the possession of these two orphans, was an event toting that they were probably out of repair and useless. The records of Suffolk County for 1699-1700 show seventy-two inventories, in but eight of which clocks or watches are mentioned. The questwe anticipated before looking. With this in mind, how shall we define keeping time in Medford in 1700, when the smallest subdivision on the hour dial of the weaver's clock is the quarter of an hour, d. A study of this clock establishes two points; first, the independence of the individual in 1700 as contrasted with the inter-dependence of 1900; and second, that when in answer to the question first looks at the old weaver's clock, can it keep time? the reply is made, it keeps the time of 1700, one understands what is meant. Mystic river above the bridge, 1835-1850. CRADOCK bridge ha
is still touching, even if it is packed away in a lot of genealogical material. It is the story of the two children, a boy and a girl, made orphans by the Spaniards. The Spaniards and the English were in continual strife in the Bahamas, and in 1699, at Nassau, the Spaniards gained control, and beginning a course of plunder and slaughter, killed, among others, the parents of these children. Mr. Brooks relates how the orphans in some unknown way escaped and fled to the wharves and found a frie hundred eleven inventories filed, and in but four of them is there mention of a clock or watch, and to three of these the epithet old is attached, indicating that they were probably out of repair and useless. The records of Suffolk County for 1699-1700 show seventy-two inventories, in but eight of which clocks or watches are mentioned. The question may now be asked, If they had no clocks or watches, how did they keep time? But, before answering, we must determine what we of 1900 mean by
ck in the other, John Albree, at the age of twelve, began life in Medford, and the tradition is that this is the clock. An investigation into this tradition will give us an insight into the Medford homes of two centuries ago. Brooks, in his history, used about all the existing material concerning John Albree. The first record of him is in a list of those assessed September 2, 1701, on a country rate, the amount being three shillings. His name appears on the lists each succeeding year. In 1711, he married Elizabeth Green, who was daughter of Samuel Green (John 2, Percival 1), and his wife, Elizabeth Sill, who was daughter of Joseph Sill and his wife, Jemima Belcher, the latter being the daughter of Andrew Belcher and Elizabeth Danforth. He bought first the property afterwards known as the Thatcher Magoun estate, on the banks of the Mystic, and later, selling it, acquired the estate through which Meeting House Brook runs, on which the second meeting-house was built. He used the br
September 30th, 1769 AD (search for this): chapter 1
Medford burying ground. III. Joseph Blanchard, eldest son of George Blanchard, by his first wife, was born in 1654; married Hannah, daughter of Thomas Shepard of Charlestown, April 13, 1681. He had seven children, and died in Charlestown, on the Blanchard Farm, October 24, 1694, aged 40. His gravestone is in the Medford burying ground. IV. Aaron Blanchard, twin son of Joseph and Hannah (Shepard), was born March 4, 1690; married Sarah——; had twelve children; died at Medford, September 30, 1769 (?) V. Aaron Blanchard, Jr., son of Aaron and Sarah ——, was born in Medford, May 21, 1722; married, 1st, Rebecca Hall of Medford, November 13, 1745. She died November 13, 1749. He married, 2d, Tabitha Floyd, who was born March, 1729, and died July 31, 1775. His third wife was Rebecca Tufts, widow of Ichabod, and daughter of Samuel Francis of Medford; they were married November 14, 1776. She died in Medford, January 28, 1817. He died in Medford, January 7, 1787. He was the fat
in the history of the United States, the nineteenth of April brought a call to arms. Again the drums beat for recruits at the High street armory, and those who had heard it nearly forty years before felt like stopping their ears and fleeing from the sound, but the boys, sons and grandsons of the men of ‘61, were full of the same excitement as in the days of the Civil War. Ninety-two names were enrolled in one week. April 29, came the disappointing news that the 5th was not needed, but on May 24, the regiment was ordered to Gloucester for an eight days tour of duty. As it was not at all certain that the boys would be ordered back to Medford at its close, they were escorted to the cars by the citizens, High School Cadets, and Fire Department. The week was no play-time, for the weather was wet and stormy, and the regiment was exercised in war-time drills. A sharp but unrewarded watch was kept for the Spanish fleet. Orders were received that on the last day of June the Light Guard
. Thomas Blanchard, the emigrant, came from Hampshire, England, in 1639. He lived in Braintree, Mass., from 1646 to 1651. In February, 1651, he bought of Rev. John Wilson, Jr., pastor of the church in Dorchester, a house and farm of two hundred acres in Charlestown, lying on the north side of Mystic river, and between Malden river on the east, and the Cradock farm, or Medford line, on the west. This land is now known as Wellington. The farm remained a part of the town of Charlestown until 1726,, when it was annexed to Malden, but later set off to Medford. Thomas Blanchard was married twice in England, and married a third wife, Mary——, after coming to New England, his second wife having died on the passage over. Four of his sons came to this country. He died on his farm in Charlestown, May 21, 1654; his widow died at Noddle's Island, now East Boston, in 1676. II. George Blanchard had two wives and ten children; lived on one-half of the farm inherited from his father, and died
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