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March 6th, 1863 AD (search for this): chapter 87
ugust. I am, General, very respectfully, Your obedient servant, T. J. Jackson, Lieutenant-General. List showing the Killed and Wounded in the Army commanded by Major-General Jackson in the Battle of Cedar Run. divisions.officers.enlisted men.enlisted men. Killed.Wounded.Killed.Wounded.Missing. Jackson's126514547231 Ewell's31714161  A. H. Hill's43245313  Total1911420494631 Total killed, wounded, and missing, 1314. Report of General Ewell. Richmond, Virginia, March 6, 1863. Colonel C. J. Faulkner, Assistant Adjutant-General: sir: I have the honor to report, as follows, the movements of my division at Cedar Run, on the ninth August, 1862: My division followed the cavalry advance, and when we reached the south end of the valley, the enemy's cavalry were seen in strong force in our front. A reconnoissance was made, and artillery fired on the enemy, which drove them back, soon to reappear. It was evident that the enemy intended to make a stand at this
March 8th, 1863 AD (search for this): chapter 87
ding Hays's brigade, (Louisiana,) General Trimble, and General Early. My losses were eight wounded in the artillery.  Killed.Wounded. Early's Brigade,16145 Trimble's Brigade,117 Forno's (Hays's) Brigade,08   Total,17178 Respectfully, R. S. Ewell, Commanding. P. S. I enclose a drawing of the field of battle, by Lieutenant Richardson, Engineer corps, showing movements of the division. Report of Major-General A. P. Hill. Headquarters Light Division, camp Gregg, March 8, 1863. Lieutenant-Colonel C. J. Faulkner, Assistant Adjutant-General: Colonel: I have the honor to submit the following report of the part taken by the light division, under my command, at the battle of Cedar Run: On the night of the seventh August, 1862, my division, to which had been added the Louisiana brigade of Colonel Stafford, encamped around Orange Court-House. That night, orders were received by me, from Major-General Jackson, to move at dawn in the morning, and in the followin
rs Department of Northern Virginia: General: I have the honor herewith to submit to you a report of the operations of my command in the battle of Cedar Run, on the ninth day of August, 1862: Intelligence having reached the commanding General that Gordonsville was endangered by the approach of the enemy, I was ordered to move in that direction with Ewell's and Jackson's divisions, from my position on the Mechanicsville turnpike, near Richmond. I arrived near Gordonsville on the nineteenth day of July. From information received respecting the strength of the opposing Federal army, under General Pope, I requested the commanding General to reenforce me. He accordingly sent forward Major-General A. P. Hill, with his division. On the second of August, whilst Colonel (now Brigadier-General) W. E. Jones, by direction of Brigadier-General Robertson, was moving with the Seventh Virginia cavalry to take charge of picket posts on the Rapidan, he received intelligence, before he reached Or
March 14th, 1863 AD (search for this): chapter 87
. Deeply do I regret to state that the following named officers (and a few privates, who could not be detected) absented themselves without leave during that period of the engagement in which my command participated, viz.: First Lieutenant B. F. Jackson and Captain Singletary, of the Ninth Louisiana regiment. All of which is respectfully submitted. L. A. Stafford, Colonel, commanding Second Louisiana Brigade. Report of Colonel Crutchfield. headquarters artillery, Second corps, March 14, 1863. Lieutenant-Colonel C. J. Faulkner, Assistant Adjutant-General: Colonel: I have the honor to submit the following report of the part taken by the artillery of this army corps in the battle of Cedar Run, of August ninth, 1862: The road on which we advanced debouched from a piece of woods upon the immediate battle-field, which was open and somewhat broken, a brook running across it and the prolongation of the road, and making a small angle with our general line of battle. The advanc
March 19th, 1863 AD (search for this): chapter 87
ouacked upon the ground, and next day were withdrawn a short distance back, and the dead buried. Major J. G. Field and Captain F. T. Hill, of my staff, were wounded, the former severely. My loss was as follows:  Killed.Wounded.  Colonels,01  Lieut.-Colonels,03  Majors,03  Captains,19  Lieutenants,316  Privates,45113      49145--Total, 194 Very respectfully, A. P. Hill. On the above report was the following indorsement: headquarters Second corps, A. N. V., March 19, 1863. Respectfully forwarded. The reason assigned by General Hill for his division not being next to Ewell's, on the day preceding the battle of Cedar Run, renders it proper that the facts of the case should be stated. For the purpose of attacking the enemy at or near Culpeper Court-House, I directed Generals Ewell and Hill to leave their encampment on the seventh, and, at dawn on the following morning, to resume the march, and move via Barnett's Ford. The positions of the two divis
ed, and nine hundred and forty-six wounded, with thirty-one missing, making two hundred and twenty-three (223) killed, and one thousand and sixty (1060) wounded. Total loss of killed, wounded, and missing, one thousand three hundred and fourteen (1314.) This loss was probably about one half that sustained by the enemy. I remained in position until the night of the eleventh, when I returned to the vicinity of Gordonsville, in order to avoid being attacked by the vastly superior force in frontckson in the Battle of Cedar Run. divisions.officers.enlisted men.enlisted men. Killed.Wounded.Killed.Wounded.Missing. Jackson's126514547231 Ewell's31714161  A. H. Hill's43245313  Total1911420494631 Total killed, wounded, and missing, 1314. Report of General Ewell. Richmond, Virginia, March 6, 1863. Colonel C. J. Faulkner, Assistant Adjutant-General: sir: I have the honor to report, as follows, the movements of my division at Cedar Run, on the ninth August, 1862: My di
e veterans, although this was their first engagement. Besides, there was no opportunity for individual distinction. There were none absent without leave, nor could I have made them leave, even if I had ordered it. L. E. D'Aquin, Captain. Report of Captain Carpenter. headquarters Carpenter's battery, in camp near Gordonsville, August 14, 1862. To Colonel Ronald, commanding First Brigade, V. D.: sir: In obedience to circular issued from headquarters Valley District, on the thirteenth instant, I have to make the following report of the part taken by this battery in the action of Cedar Run, on the ninth day of August, 1862. I received orders early in the afternoon to take my Parrott piece to the front, which was promptly executed, placing it in position within seven hundred yards of five or six pieces of the enemy. Major Andrews, thinking it would be rather an unequal contest, ordered me not to commence firing until Captain Poague could bring his in position, when we comme
March, 1863 AD (search for this): chapter 87
few exceptions, they fought bravely, obeying all the commands of their officers promptly and cheerfully, displaying, throughout the whole day, an amount of bravery and disciplined valor, which I don't believe has been excelled during the war. I herewith enclose a report of the casualties on that day. I have the honor to be, Your obedient servant, J. A. Walker, Colonel Thirteenth Virginia Infantry. Report of Lieutenant-Colonel R. L. Walker. headquarters artillery battalion, March, 1863. Major: I have the honor to submit the following report of the part taken by the artillery of the light division in the battle of Cedar Run, August ninth, 1862: At about three o'clock P. M., all my batteries being in park near the house of----, I received an order from Major-General A. P. Hill to carry forward all my long-range guns, which order I immediately obeyed, but was unable to get more than two of my batteries in position, as the road was so blocked up with wagons and ambula
, he was ordered to halt, and remained until morning. I joined in with Colonel Lee, of the Thirty-third, and advanced, overtaking the Second and Fourth, who had halted in a cornfield, on the right of the main road leading to Culpeper Court-House, where the brigade remained over night and until about nine o'clock on the morning of the tenth. The enemy not having made any demonstration up to that time, we were ordered back a distance of about three miles, and camped until the morning of the twelfth, when we were ordered to take up the line of march to our old camp, near Liberty Mills, at which place we arrived about six o'clock P. M. I forward with this a list of casualties. Very respectfully, your obedient servant, H. J. Williams, Major, commanding Fifth Virginia Infantry. Report of Lieutenant-Colonel Hughes. headquarters Forty-Eighth regiment Alabama volunteers, August 13, 1862. Colonel A. G. Taliaferro, commanding Third Brigade, Army of the Valley: sir: I have the h
as confirmed in my opinion that the heavy forces concentrated in front rendered it unwise, on my part, to renew the action. The main body of my troops were, however, so posted as to receive the attack, if the enemy decided to advance. On the eleventh, a flag of truce was received from the enemy, who requested permission, until two o'clock, to remove and bury his dead, not already interred by our troops. This was granted, and the time subsequently extended, by request of the enemy, to five ie thousand and sixty (1060) wounded. Total loss of killed, wounded, and missing, one thousand three hundred and fourteen (1314.) This loss was probably about one half that sustained by the enemy. I remained in position until the night of the eleventh, when I returned to the vicinity of Gordonsville, in order to avoid being attacked by the vastly superior force in front of me, and with the hope that, by thus falling back, General Pope would be induced to follow me until I should be reenforced
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