hide Sorting

You can sort these results in two ways:

By entity
Chronological order for dates, alphabetical order for places and people.
By position (current method)
As the entities appear in the document.

You are currently sorting in ascending order. Sort in descending order.

hide Most Frequent Entities

The entities that appear most frequently in this document are shown below.

Entity Max. Freq Min. Freq
United States (United States) 24 0 Browse Search
Ann Jackson 14 0 Browse Search
Banks 13 1 Browse Search
Butler 12 0 Browse Search
John Rogers 12 0 Browse Search
Alabama (Alabama, United States) 12 0 Browse Search
Strasburg, Va. (Virginia, United States) 12 0 Browse Search
Missouri (Missouri, United States) 10 0 Browse Search
John H. Winder 10 0 Browse Search
Daniel E. Sickles 9 1 Browse Search
View all entities in this document...

Browsing named entities in The Daily Dispatch: may 28, 1862., [Electronic resource].

Found 648 total hits in 306 results.

... 21 22 23 24 25 26 27 28 29 30 31
Oliver Gromwell (search for this): article 4
the dead, to behold the shipwreck of faith and morals which has been worked by their own religious system. The present war is claimed by New England philosophers as the result of Puritan ideas. a grand step in the march of Puritan progress. No one can doubt the fact. and by such fruits let the world judge the line which has borne them — It is a war of aggression of interference with other people's business, of wholesale spoliation, robbing, and murder in fine, the Round head war of Oliver Gromwell over again, and no war ever had in it less of the principles of Christianity, or even common humanity.--If any Turk or heretic of modern times has conducted a warfare on principles more antagonistical to the Gospel than the present Puritan crusade, we do not know where to look for his record. Such exhibitions as these ought to satisfy all true Christian men of the danger of fanaticism, in whatever shape it may present itself. Moderation in all things is the true Christian rule. When
New England (United States) (search for this): article 4
enemy within, who delivers up to the enemy outside the key of a citadel which he could never by his own energies have entered and overcome. Fanaticism almost always ends in infidelity. That has been its invariable termination in Germany and New England. The honest zealots of primitive Puritanism would be astounded. Could they rise from the dead, to behold the shipwreck of faith and morals which has been worked by their own religious system. The present war is claimed by New England philosNew England philosophers as the result of Puritan ideas. a grand step in the march of Puritan progress. No one can doubt the fact. and by such fruits let the world judge the line which has borne them — It is a war of aggression of interference with other people's business, of wholesale spoliation, robbing, and murder in fine, the Round head war of Oliver Gromwell over again, and no war ever had in it less of the principles of Christianity, or even common humanity.--If any Turk or heretic of modern times has c
Puritan (Ohio, United States) (search for this): article 4
of primitive Puritanism would be astounded. Could they rise from the dead, to behold the shipwreck of faith and morals which has been worked by their own religious system. The present war is claimed by New England philosophers as the result of Puritan ideas. a grand step in the march of Puritan progress. No one can doubt the fact. and by such fruits let the world judge the line which has borne them — It is a war of aggression of interference with other people's business, of wholesale spoliiver Gromwell over again, and no war ever had in it less of the principles of Christianity, or even common humanity.--If any Turk or heretic of modern times has conducted a warfare on principles more antagonistical to the Gospel than the present Puritan crusade, we do not know where to look for his record. Such exhibitions as these ought to satisfy all true Christian men of the danger of fanaticism, in whatever shape it may present itself. Moderation in all things is the true Christian rule.
John H. Winder (search for this): article 4
Past during. --This habit has been pursued with so much vim for several days past by visiting jehnes that it has become a nuisance, and attracted the attention of the officers charged with its suppression. Yesterday evening a lisatenant and a private in some one of the company's of the 1st regiment, came along by the Provost Marshal's office, corner of 9th and Broad on horseback, and are rate that might not inappropriately be called "fast and farious." They were halted by the officers after some trouble and being taken before Major Griswold, the Lieutenant was sent before General Winder. who paroled him to appear at 3 o'clock this morning. The soldier was sent to Castle Godwin until the same hour. The steeds wors sent to the Government stable to be taken care of.
Past during. --This habit has been pursued with so much vim for several days past by visiting jehnes that it has become a nuisance, and attracted the attention of the officers charged with its suppression. Yesterday evening a lisatenant and a private in some one of the company's of the 1st regiment, came along by the Provost Marshal's office, corner of 9th and Broad on horseback, and are rate that might not inappropriately be called "fast and farious." They were halted by the officers after some trouble and being taken before Major Griswold, the Lieutenant was sent before General Winder. who paroled him to appear at 3 o'clock this morning. The soldier was sent to Castle Godwin until the same hour. The steeds wors sent to the Government stable to be taken care of.
ge for their manufactures, and to Canada the market for her fish, potatoes, and other products, which has been heretofore monopolized by the North. Had those powers united with Spain, recognized us, raised the blockade, and taken our crops last December, when the North was cowed by the resolute conduct of England in reclaiming our Commissioners, they would have had, no war. The indignation of the Northern people would have been turned against their Republican leaders, and they would have occupi with partial success, interference may cost those powers a war; but since the battle must be fought by them either at our door or their own, is it not better it should be done now while we can aid and reward them? In not coming out for us last December, it does appear to me that English statesmen committed what Talleyrand denounced as "worse than a crime — a blunder" Hoping they may yet repair it, and wishing them better judgment in future, I am very respectfully, Your servant. A Refuges fro
her countries, how can England, France, and Spain resist their dominion? From the former, aided (if need be) by Russia, they will take her American possessions, including the fisheries, whose competition they have, from the last, Cuba and St. Domingo; from all, the markets of the world. For, strive as they may, never will those powers be able to obtain elsewhere cotton so good and cheap as we can furnish to them. Mexico, of course, will be theirs in time — an empire far greater than ever Napoleon could have attumed to. See, in contrast to this, what assisting us will give to the European powers.--All we ask is recognition, and the raising of the blockade, that we may receive your manufactures (including munitions of war) in return for our crops. Our independence once established, the power of the North is broken, and she can no more be dangerous. We offer to England and France our coasting trade, our law material in exchange for their manufactures, and to Canada the market fo
o to the states men of your nation, and respectfully request you, if you think them worth notice to place them before your countrymen. To the South it is clear (and I believe it must be so to every one who candidly exam into the matter that this war against her was designed by the Republican party from the moment this party sprang into existence. For slavery they cared nothing. It was merely the convenient stepping-stone by which taking advantage of the strong prejudice created by Mrs. Stowe's misrepresentations, they rose to power. By the adoption of the Chicago Platform, by heaping upon us insults and threats by their persistent refuser, after the of their President, to give us any security that our constitutional rights should be respected, they intentionally goaded us into separating from them, and then, lost Europe should perceive their designs, by trickery cast upon on the odium of beginning the war. No doubt they hoped to subdue us more easily than they now flad to be
ense apprehension of the United States lest they should perceive and foil her designs, which are almost as much against those powers as against ourselves? So gigantic a scheme of robbery and wrong has never yet been conceived since the days of that great robber, Rome, and the worse on the part of the United States, as she has so loudly asserted the inherent right of man to self government. No wonder Russia should be her friend, it throws the partition of Poland into the shade, and no doubt Seward has promised that power that the fall of Sebastopot shall be avenged.--What can hinder it, if they are allowed by their naval superiority to "crush out the rebellion" and consolidate their power over us? The rebellion! What audacious wrong to call it so? Our revolution of was indeed a rebellion, for England had rights over her colonies which one act of States cannot pretend to have over another, and which were expressly denied to them when our Constitution was formed. But lust of power
Talleyrand (search for this): article 4
of the Northern people would have been turned against their Republican leaders, and they would have occupied themselves with putting them out of power. Now that these are flushed with partial success, interference may cost those powers a war; but since the battle must be fought by them either at our door or their own, is it not better it should be done now while we can aid and reward them? In not coming out for us last December, it does appear to me that English statesmen committed what Talleyrand denounced as "worse than a crime — a blunder" Hoping they may yet repair it, and wishing them better judgment in future, I am very respectfully, Your servant. A Refuges from the Valley of the Mississippi. Lynchburg, Va., May, 1862. A copy of the above was sent to the Consul of France, with the following note. Monsient — Your courtesy will pardon any errors I may commit in the mode of addressing you, when I tell you that my life has been mostly passed in quiet country p
... 21 22 23 24 25 26 27 28 29 30 31