hide Matching Documents

The documents where this entity occurs most often are shown below. Click on a document to open it.

Document Max. Freq Min. Freq
View all matching documents...

Your search returned 1,470 results in 357 document sections:

... 25 26 27 28 29 30 31 32 33 34 35 ...
s ordered to Aquia creek, except the First regiment, which was ordered to Tennessee. In the organization of the army of Northern Virginia, on the peninsula, April 30, 1862, the Tennessee brigade, composed of the First, Col. Peter Turney; the Seventh, Col. Robert Hatton, and the Fourteenth, Col. W. A. Forbes, 2,030 strong, was commanded by Brig.-Gen. Samuel R. Anderson, and constituted a part of Whiting's division of the reserve corps under the command of Maj.-Gen. G. W. Smith. On the 8th of May this brigade participated in the affair at Eltham, which, General Smith stated, forms one of the most interesting incidents of the march of my command in retiring from Yorktown out of the peninsula. Having learned that the enemy had anchored off West Point and was landing troops, General Smith attacked on May 7th with Hood's and Hampton's brigades. Two attempts were made to flank the Confederates, but the appearance of Gen. S. R. Anderson with the Tennessee brigade (said the division gen
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 11. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), General Beauregard's report of the battle of Drury's Bluff. (search)
k and repaired damages—put on a new steel prow, exchanged two of her guns for two others, and on May 8, more formidable than ever, again went out to attack the Federal fleet which had been reinforced; the latter cheered and dipped their flags as the Jamestown passed with the prizes. On the 8th of May, when the Merrimac had returned to Norfolk for supplies, a squadron consisting of the Monitor to Norfolk and Richmond, and then went up to the Navy Yard to water. I think it was on the 8th day of May that Flag-officer Goldsborough took advantage of her absence to bombard Sewell's Point with r power and efficiency. The South also had the same exaggerated idea of the vessel. On the 8th of May a squadron, including the Monitor, bombarded our batteries at Sewell Point. We immediately letack on Fort Brown, where Major Brown was killed. But the fort held out until succor came. On May 8th the forces under General Taylor, returning from Point Isabel, encountered the Mexicans, led by
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 11. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), The Merrimac and Monitor. (search)
The Virginia the next morning returned to Norfolk, went into dock and repaired damages—put on a new steel prow, exchanged two of her guns for two others, and on May 8, more formidable than ever, again went out to attack the Federal fleet which had been reinforced by the Galena and Vanderbilt, and was bombarding the Confederate boffered no resistance. French and English men-of-war were present; the latter cheered and dipped their flags as the Jamestown passed with the prizes. On the 8th of May, when the Merrimac had returned to Norfolk for supplies, a squadron consisting of the Monitor, Naugatuck and Galena (iron-clads) and five large men-of-war, coms in this position, offering battle, and protecting the approaches to Norfolk and Richmond, and then went up to the Navy Yard to water. I think it was on the 8th day of May that Flag-officer Goldsborough took advantage of her absence to bombard Sewell's Point with a number of his vessels—the Monitor, Galena, and Naugatuck include
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 11. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Services of the Virginia (Merrimac). (search)
olk for its protection. Commodore Tatnall commanded the Virginia forty-five days, of which time there were only thirteen days that she was not in dock or in the hands of the navy-yard. Yet he succeed in impressing the enemy that we were ready for active service. It was evident that the enemy very much overrated Some of the Northern papers estimated her to be equivalent to an army corps. our power and efficiency. The South also had the same exaggerated idea of the vessel. On the 8th of May a squadron, including the Monitor, bombarded our batteries at Sewell Point. We immediately left the yard for the Roads. As we drew near, the Monitor and her consorts ceased bombarding, and retreated under the guns of the forts, keeping beyond the range of our guns. Men-of-war from below the forts, and vessels expressly fitted for running us down, joined the other vessels between the forts. It looked as if the fleet was about to make a fierce onslaught upon us. But we were again to be
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 11. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Laying the corner Stone of the monument tomb of the Army of Tennessee Association, New Orleans. (search)
epaired to his plantation in Brazoria county, Texas, and was made happy by the admission of Texas, in 1845, to a place as one of the independent and sovereign States of the American Union. On the admission of Texas into the Union, General Z. Taylor was ordered to the Rio Grande to protect our western frontier from the threatened invasion of the Mexicans. The Mexicans began the contest by an attack on Fort Brown, where Major Brown was killed. But the fort held out until succor came. On May 8th the forces under General Taylor, returning from Point Isabel, encountered the Mexicans, led by General Ampudia, on the plain of Palo Alto and defeated them, with a loss of nine killed and forty-four wounded men. The loss of the Mexicans, 600 men. On the next day, the 9th, was fought the battle of Resaca de la Palma, when 6,000 Mexicans were defeated with a loss of 1,000 men. American loss, 110. Under the call for volunteers, General Johnston was made, by election, Colonel commanding the Fi
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 11. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Diary of Rev. J. G. Law. (search)
of battle all day in a drenching rain. To-morrow we will probably meet the foe. Then comes the tug of war. Conquer we must, For in God is our trust. May 6th.—On fatigue duty at the Ordnance Department, loading and unloading wagons of ammunition. Arms of all kinds are also coming in, Enfield rifles, etc. We are fully prepared for the enemy, and are receiving reinforcements every day. The inclement weather may retard field operations, and the battle may be delayed several days. ,May 8th.—The regiment lay in line of battle in the woods. Slept all the morning, and read Lady Glenlyon in the evening. Sharp skirmishing on our right all day. May 9th.—Halt by the roadside and seat myself on a log to write. The evening is lovely. The booming of cannon and the rattle of musketry has just ceased, and all nature sleeps in calm repose. Heavy skirmishing again all day on the right, and it is reported that we have repulsed the enemy. May 10th.—Heavy firing again to-day. Gen
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 12. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Operations from the 6th to the 11th of May, 1864—Report of General B. R. Johnson. (search)
regiment and a battery in position on the crossing of the road from Chesterfield Courthouse to this point. Leave a line of pickets to withdraw at daylight. Intrenching tools will be sent you at Swift Creek. I am, very respectfully, your obedient servant, [Signed] G. G. Pickett, Major-General. This was received by me about 10 P. M. on the 7th of May, 1864. Between to and 11 P. M. the artillery was put in motion. At 12 P. M. the infantry moved, and by 3 A. M. on the morning of the 8th of May our forces had crossed to the south bank of Swift Creek. During the day and night of the 8th I sent out several parties to the junction to collect property, arms and accoutrements. The field of battle was occupied by our troops until about 10 A. M. on Monday, the 9th inst., when the enemy advanced upon our position at Swift Creek. In this advance they passed to the north of the junction. From reports of cavalry and from the observations of Major-General Hill, who returned from the junc
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 13. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), The Merrimac and the Monitor—Report of the Committee on Naval Affairs. (search)
in, and she captured several prizes, in which the Monitor seemed to acquiesce, as she offered no resistance. French and English men-of-war were present; the latter cheered and dipped their flags as the Jamestown passed with the prizes. On the 8th of May, when the Merrimac had returned to Norfolk for supplies, a squadron, consisting of the Monitor, Naugatuck, and Galena (iron-clads), and five large men-of-war commenced to bombard our batteries at Sewell's Point. The Merrimac immediately left ld Point and the Rip-Raps was another. (2.) The Merrimac remained for some days in this position, offering battle, and protecting the approaches to Norfolk and Richmond, and then went up to the navy-yard to water. I think it was on the 8th day of May that Flag-Officer Goldsborough took advantage of her absence to bombard Sewell's Point with a number of his vessels, the Monitor, Galena and Naugatuck included, all three iron-clads. When the fact was known in Norfolk the Merrimac cast off f
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 14. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Report of the conduct of General George H. Steuart's brigade from the 5th to the 12th of May, 1864, inclusive. (search)
ble to fire, as they were empty and there was no ammunition, and in this act of duty James lost his right arm. From these facts Steuart ever claimed the guns as his capture. The only counter attack made by Steuart and Battle was that immediately following the death of the lamented Jones, with the results above indicated; this being ended, the troops lay quietly building breastworks all the afternoon on the line selected, and where they remained until moved by the right to Spotsylvania, May the 8th. General Ewell, in his report, makes no mention whatever of Steuart's brigade on the evening of the 10th, in the recapture of Doles's works. The facts are as hereinbefore stated. Steuart, facing by the rear rank, left his works and advancing across to Doles's line took an active part in that engagement. The two North Carolina regiments had served in Doles's brigade from the Seven Days battles around Richmond through the Second Manassas and Maryland campaign to Fredericksburg, 13th D
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 14. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Address before the Virginia division of Army of Northern Virginia, at their reunion on the evening of October 21, 1886. (search)
o had been appointed a Brigadier General in the Confederate army, was assigned to the command of the troops on the Alexandria line, and was directed to post his brigade of South Carolina volunteers at the Manassas Junction, and to establish his headquarters at that point, or in advance as he might find necessary. Colonel G. H. Terrett, who had been in command at Alexandria, retained it, and so did Colonel Philip St. George Cocke of those of Culpeper, where, from a report made by him on the 8th May, he had twelve hundred men. Both commands were embraced in General Bonham's district. Ibid, page 879. Thus it was that South Carolina troops were among the very first stationed at Manassas, a field soon to be rendered famous in the annals of the Army of Northern Virginia, and which they were to hallow, in both the great battles fought upon it, with the blood of so many of the noblest sons of their State. A field on which South Carolina furnished the sacrifice of the first general offi
... 25 26 27 28 29 30 31 32 33 34 35 ...