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ashub Bourne and his associates, William Dennison and Samuel Cooper. His office was at one time on Court Street, at number ten and a half, on the north side; and later at number ninety, according to the numbers of that period. For some time in 1802-3 he was at the South, attending to business which grew out of his father's estate. He remained three months at Savannah, in the early part of 1803, and was present at trials in which John M. Berrien, then a young man, won his first distinction. ated with the leading opponents of the order in the State,—John Quincy Adams, Pliny Merrick, Benjamin F. Hallett, Henry Gassett, and Amasa Walker. He had been himself initiated, about 1799, when quite a young man, and had become a master-mason in 1802. A year later he was the eulogist of the order, in a poem and an address before the Grand Lodge of the State. In 1806, however, he discontinued his attendance on its meetings. In 1829, he renounced his connection with it. The same year, he wro
r. Quincy's house on Pearl Street during his absences from the State. Mr. Quincy was soon absorbed in politics, as a leader of the Federal party, and severed his active connection with the profession; but he remained the friend of his pupil, notwithstanding their differences in politics, which made sharp divisions in society in those days. Mr. Sumner, in company with Richard Sullivan and Holder Slocum, was proposed as an attorney in the Court of Common Pleas in Boston, at the April Term, 1801 (May 7); and admitted to practice at the July Term (July 11), before Chief Justice Shearjashub Bourne and his associates, William Dennison and Samuel Cooper. His office was at one time on Court Street, at number ten and a half, on the north side; and later at number ninety, according to the numbers of that period. For some time in 1802-3 he was at the South, attending to business which grew out of his father's estate. He remained three months at Savannah, in the early part of 1803, and w
together on the Sabbath, to and from the meeting-house! Josiah Quincy, on the occasion of the death, in December, 1858, of Mrs. Steams, whose senior he was by four years, gave pleasant reminiscences of her childhood, and of his residence in Mr. French's family in his boyhood. Memorial of Madam Abigail Stearns, with Funeral Discourses of Rev. Samuel Sewall, and of her son, Rev. Jonathan F. Stearns. Boston, 1859. Charles Pinckney Sumner entered Harvard College in 1792, and graduated in 1796. The members of his class who became most widely known were Dr. James Jackson, the eminent physician, who survived till 1867; Rev. Dr. Leonard Woods; and John Pickering. Charles Sumner's tributes to Mr. Pickering are well known. Biographical Sketch of the late John Pickering, Works, Vol. I. p. 214; The Scholar (Mr. Pickering), the Jurist, the Artist, the Philanthropist, Works Vol. I. p. 241. His college quarterly-bills, including board in commons and tuition, varied from twenty-eight
June 25th, 1835 AD (search for this): chapter 2
of Ebenezer Pemberton, and was placed in the family of Rev. Jonathan French, the minister of the South Parish of that town. Mr. Pemberton was a graduate of Princeton College. James Madison and Aaron Burr are supposed to have been his pupils. It has been said of him that no teacher had a higher character for scholarship, manners, elegance, and piety. While of a kindly nature and beloved by his pupils, he maintained discipline and respect for authority after the old style. He died, June 25, 1835, at the age of eighty-nine. History of Andover, by Abiel Abbot, Andover, 1829; Allen's American Biographical Dictionary. Edmund Quincy, in his Life of Josiah Quincy, p. 28, says of Mr. Pemberton: This gentleman lived till 1836, and was past ninety when he died. I well remember the handsome old man, and the beautiful picture of serene and venerable age which he presented, seeming in old-world courtesy and costume to have stepped out of the last century into this, and the pride with w
ho was two years his junior in the course. A correspondence ensued. Their letters are playful, and hopeful of the future. Sumner's letters refer to books and poems he had read, as Hogarth Moralized, Roberts' Epistle to a Young Gentleman on leaving Eton School, Masson's Elegy to a Young Nobleman leaving the University, Pope's Eloisa to Abelard, Goldsmith's Edwin and Angelina, Shenstone's Pastoral Ballad, and some pieces in Enfield's Speaker. Sumner did not persevere as a teacher. In 1797-98 he passed nearly a year in the West Indies. He then began the study of law with Judge George R. Minot, an historical writer and effective public speaker. As early as 1799 he accepted an invitation from Josiah Quincy to a desk in his law-office; and was, while the relation continued, accustomed to have charge of the office, and to sleep in Mr. Quincy's house on Pearl Street during his absences from the State. Mr. Quincy was soon absorbed in politics, as a leader of the Federal party, and s
March 14th (search for this): chapter 2
standard to corporate and public affairs as to private life. In October, 1837, during the suspension of specie payments, he moved, as a stockholder of the State Bank, that no dividends be paid till its bills were redeemable in specie. The motion was lost, but he recorded his determination to renew it the next year. Sheriff Sumner's health was feeble in his later years. He became quite ill early in January, 1839, and after that month was confined to his house. He resigned his office, March 14. Governor Everett delayed action, hoping for his recovery; but relieved him, April 11, by the appointment of Joseph Eveleth as his successor. The judges of the Supreme Judicial Court, by a formal letter, drawn by Chief Justice Shaw, gratefully recognized his uniform kindness and attention during his administration. He died, April 24, at the age of sixty-three, the period which he had often designated as his probable end. In length of life, he and his son Charles differed less than one mon
August 29th, 1811 AD (search for this): chapter 2
ional glory, as he does our affection. These a grateful empire will voluntarily pay; but he deserves more: he deserves that you be faithful to yourselves, that you be free, united, and happy; that party asperity from this memorable day subside; and all, with liberal eye, seek private interest in the common weal. Mr. Sumner did not become actively interested in politics till 1803, near the close of Mr. Jefferson's first administration. Letter of Charles Pinckney Sumner, published Aug. 29, 1811, in the Commercial Gazette, Boston, dated Aug. 2:3, 1811, replying to the charge that he is an apostate. This letter was copied in the National Intelligencer. In another letter he denied having been at any time a member of a Jacobin club. The antagonism between the Federal party, which opposed Mr. Jefferson, and the Republican or Democratic party, which sustained him, was at its height. The Federalists, as a minority, had departed from the traditions of Washington's administration, an
June 2nd, 1833 AD (search for this): chapter 2
s which were frequent in American cities from 1834 to 1838, and which usually grew out of Slavery, religious antipathies, or criminal trials; and he insisted often on a more vigorous police. As early as 1830, he took an active interest in the temperance question; Article on exclusion of bars from theatres, in Commercial Gazette, Nov. 8, 1830. and, in the years immediately succeeding, delivered lectures, in which he enforced the duty of sobriety. At Holliston, May 4, 1831; Boston, June 2, 1833. He favored the restrictive legislation of 1837-38, and insisted on the immorality of licensing the sale of ardent spirits. He promoted the improvement of public schools. In 1818, when there were only five such schools in Boston, and these were crowded, he published several newspaper articles, in which he urged additional schools and an increase in the number of teachers for each. Boston Yankee, May 15, June 11 and 18, July 2, 9, and 23. Sheriff Sumner attended, in his early ma
d, who was two years his junior in the course. A correspondence ensued. Their letters are playful, and hopeful of the future. Sumner's letters refer to books and poems he had read, as Hogarth Moralized, Roberts' Epistle to a Young Gentleman on leaving Eton School, Masson's Elegy to a Young Nobleman leaving the University, Pope's Eloisa to Abelard, Goldsmith's Edwin and Angelina, Shenstone's Pastoral Ballad, and some pieces in Enfield's Speaker. Sumner did not persevere as a teacher. In 1797-98 he passed nearly a year in the West Indies. He then began the study of law with Judge George R. Minot, an historical writer and effective public speaker. As early as 1799 he accepted an invitation from Josiah Quincy to a desk in his law-office; and was, while the relation continued, accustomed to have charge of the office, and to sleep in Mr. Quincy's house on Pearl Street during his absences from the State. Mr. Quincy was soon absorbed in politics, as a leader of the Federal party, a
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