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Browsing named entities in The Daily Dispatch: may 28, 1862., [Electronic resource].

Found 648 total hits in 306 results.

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--The Missouri Army Argas, published in camp near Corinth has an admirable article upon the letter of Gen, Beauregard to Gen. Yan-Dorn, requiring the names of all officers and privates who distinguished themselves to be reported to him, as well as all those who misbehave or abendon their colors. it says This step inaugurates a new are in the army of the South. It has long been a complain, that once in the ranks always in the ranks. No matter how gallant a private might behave, it is argued that he never was promoted. New, we cannot say whether this be true or not. But one thing is certain, that in the future the rule of Napoleon which made his army the best the world ever saw, is to be the rule of our army-Several of Napoleon's Fleed Marshals rose from tire ranks. Undoubtedly there are many men in the ranks who fire worthy of being made officers, and there are many officers who ought to be in the ranks. This order, if greadily followed out. will do justice to the se
--The Missouri Army Argas, published in camp near Corinth has an admirable article upon the letter of Gen, Beauregard to Gen. Yan-Dorn, requiring the names of all officers and privates who distinguished themselves to be reported to him, as well as all those who misbehave or abendon their colors. it says This step inaugurates a new are in the army of the South. It has long been a complain, that once in the ranks always in the ranks. No matter how gallant a private might behave, it is argued that he never was promoted. New, we cannot say whether this be true or not. But one thing is certain, that in the future the rule of Napoleon which made his army the best the world ever saw, is to be the rule of our army-Several of Napoleon's Fleed Marshals rose from tire ranks. Undoubtedly there are many men in the ranks who fire worthy of being made officers, and there are many officers who ought to be in the ranks. This order, if greadily followed out. will do justice to the ser
Beenregurd (search for this): article 7
arless bayonet charge. We believe that when every ounce of powder and lead is shot away, our army, if properly drilled, will really be stronger than it ever war. The greatest minds in the South are coming to the conclusion that our liberties are to be well by the bayonet. Those regiments or companies that most distinguish themselves in bayonet charges will march on the true road to honor and preferment. We trat that all regimental commanders will faithfully execute this order of General Beenregurd Let our men see that great merit will not be overlooked. Let them feel that if they dare and suffer, their gallantry will be acknowledged and rewarded. Men of the Army of the West ! here is a chance for you. By unexampled bravery high on the rail of fame. If we succeed in this war — and we cannot doubt our final success — the Southern Confederacy is obliged to become a military people--Ten times more military than we ever have been. Every boy must have a military as well as a
Napoleon (Ohio, United States) (search for this): article 7
ell as all those who misbehave or abendon their colors. it says This step inaugurates a new are in the army of the South. It has long been a complain, that once in the ranks always in the ranks. No matter how gallant a private might behave, it is argued that he never was promoted. New, we cannot say whether this be true or not. But one thing is certain, that in the future the rule of Napoleon which made his army the best the world ever saw, is to be the rule of our army-Several of Napoleon's Fleed Marshals rose from tire ranks. Undoubtedly there are many men in the ranks who fire worthy of being made officers, and there are many officers who ought to be in the ranks. This order, if greadily followed out. will do justice to the service. Let every man recollect that the road to distination is now open to every soldier, whether private or officer. All experience attacts that a brave army suffers less in killed and wounded that a hesitating, laggard army. Whenever it is nece
E. T. Robinson (search for this): article 8
The sick at Camp Winder. --Persone wiching to contribure refreshments for the sick soldiers at Camp Winder, are requested to send them to the store of William G. Dandridge, on Broad street, near Ninth, or to the drugstore of E. T. Robinson, corner of Fourth and Franklin streets, before 12 o'clock M. The ladies will then take the contributions in charge and distribute them among the soldiers. This is an excellent movement, and we hope our citizens will see that the ladies are kept well supplied with the means of carrying on their mission of benevolence.
William G. Dandridge (search for this): article 8
The sick at Camp Winder. --Persone wiching to contribure refreshments for the sick soldiers at Camp Winder, are requested to send them to the store of William G. Dandridge, on Broad street, near Ninth, or to the drugstore of E. T. Robinson, corner of Fourth and Franklin streets, before 12 o'clock M. The ladies will then take the contributions in charge and distribute them among the soldiers. This is an excellent movement, and we hope our citizens will see that the ladies are kept well supplied with the means of carrying on their mission of benevolence.
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