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Browsing named entities in a specific section of Philip Henry Sheridan, Personal Memoirs of P. H. Sheridan, General, United States Army .. Search the whole document.

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October 22nd, 1864 AD (search for this): chapter 28
e within thirty days, Philip H. Sheridan is appointed a major-general in the United States Army. The direct result of the battle was the recapture of all the artillery, transportation, and camp equipage we had lost, and in addition twenty-four pieces of the enemy's artillery, twelve hundred prisoners, and a number of battle-flags. But more still flowed from this victory, succeeding as it did the disaster of the morning, for the re-occupation of our Executive Mansion. Washington, Oct. 22, 1864 Major General Sheridan. with great pleasure I render to you and your brave army the thanks of the nation, and my own personal admiration and gratitude, for the month's operations in the Shenandoah Valley, and especially for the splendid work of October 19, 1864. your Obt. Servt. Abraham Lincoln. old camps at once re-established a morale which for some hours had been greatly endangered by ill-fortune. It was not till after the battle that I learned fully what had taken place be
October 19th (search for this): chapter 28
ly wounded, died the next day. When the news of the victory was received, General Grant directed a salute of one hundred shotted guns to be fired into Petersburg, and the President at once thanked the army in an autograph letter. A few weeks after, he promoted me, and I received notice of this in a special letter from the Secretary of war, saying, that for the personal gallantry, military skill, and just confidence in the courage and patriotism of your troops, displayed by you on the 19th day of October at Cedar Run, whereby, under the blessing of Providence, your routed army was reorganized, a great National disaster averted, and a brilliant victory achieved over the rebels for the third time in pitched battle within thirty days, Philip H. Sheridan is appointed a major-general in the United States Army. The direct result of the battle was the recapture of all the artillery, transportation, and camp equipage we had lost, and in addition twenty-four pieces of the enemy's artillery,
October 12th, 1864 AD (search for this): chapter 28
of this railroad began to prevail, and the work on it was discontinued. The Sixth Corps, therefore, abandoned that route, and moved toward Ashby's Gap with the purpose of marching direct to Washington, but on the 13th I recalled it to Cedar Creek, in consequence of the arrival of the enemy's infantry at Fisher's Hill, and the receipt, the night before, of the following despatch, which again opened the question of an advance on Gordonsville and Charlottesville: (Cipher.) Washington, October 12, 1864, 12 M. Major-General Sheridan: Lieutenant-General Grant wishes a position taken far enough south to serve as a base for further operations upon Gordonsville and Charlottesville. It must be strongly fortified and provisioned. Some point in the vicinity of Manassas Gap would seem best suited for all purposes. Colonel Alexander, of the Engineers, will be sent to consult with you as soon as you connect with General Augur. H. W. Halleck, Major-General. As it was well known in Wa
October 13th, 1864 AD (search for this): chapter 28
fortified and provisioned. Some point in the vicinity of Manassas Gap would seem best suited for all purposes. Colonel Alexander, of the Engineers, will be sent to consult with you as soon as you connect with General Augur. H. W. Halleck, Major-General. As it was well known in Washington that the views expressed in the above despatch were counter to my convictions, I was the next day required by the following telegram from Secretary Stanton to repair to that city: Washington, October 13, 1864. Major-General Sheridan (through General Augur): If you can come here, a consultation on several points is extremely desirable. I propose to visit General Grant, and would like to see you first. Edwin M. Stanton, Secretary of War. I got all ready to comply with the terms of Secretary Stanton's despatch, but in the meantime the enemy appeared in my front in force, with infantry and cavalry, and attacked Colonel Thoburn, who had been pushed out toward Strasburg from Crook's com
October 16th, 1864 AD (search for this): chapter 28
there received the following despatch and inclosure from General Wright, who had been left in command at Cedar Creek: headquarters Middle Military division, October 16, 1864. General: I enclose you despatch which explains itself. If the enemy should be strongly re-enforced in cavalry, he might, by turning our right, give us am one of the ablest of the Confederate generals. Therefore I sent the following note to General Wright: headquarters Middle Military division, Front Royal, October 16, 1864. General: The cavalry is all ordered back to you; make your position strong. If Longstreet's despatch is true, he is under the impression that we have lotect the line of railroad, and through him received the following reply from General Halleck: headquarters armies of the United States, Washington, D. C., October 16, 1864. To Major-General Sheridan, Rectortown, Va. General Grant says that Longstreet brought with him no troops from Richmond, but I have very little confidence
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