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October 6th, 1864 AD (search for this): chapter 15
usseau, Steedman, Morgan, Washburne and Croxton, were now (under the direction of General Thomas, who had arrived at Nashville on the 3d of October) joined in the grand hunt for Forrest. The latter, looking out from Columbia, saw his peril, and met it as usual. Paroling the thousand prisoners he had captured, he destroyed five miles of the railroad southward from the Duck River, and then pushing across the country by way of Mount Pleasant and Lawrenceburg, he escaped over the Tennessee Oct. 6, 1864. at Bainbridge, with very little loss. Thomas's Headquarters, this is a view of the fine mansion of Mr. Cunningham, 15 high Street, Nashville, occupied by Generals Buell and Thomas, and other commanders, in that city. While these operations were going on in Tennessee and Northern Alabama, the movements of Hood against Sherman's communications northward of the Chattahoochee, already considered, See page 897. were begun. To watch and meet Hood's troops, as his plans might be
December 1st (search for this): chapter 15
wing, make demonstrations in the direction of Augusta, and give Wheeler all the fighting he desired. At the same time Howard, with the divisions of Woods and Corse, was moving south of the Ogeechee, along the dirt road leading to Savannah, while the divisions of Hazen and J. E. Smith were still further to the right. At Statesborough the former had a severe skirmish Dec. 4. with some Confederate cavalry, which he dispersed. Slocum marched from Louisville with the left wing, on the 1st of December, the Twentieth Corps in advance. It moved down the left bank of the Ogeechee, everywhere met by fallen trees or other obstructions in the swamps. The Fourteenth Corps moved farther to the left, and Kilpatrick, supported by Baird's infantry division of that corps, pushed on toward Waynesboroa. At Thomas's Station, on the railway connecting Millen and Augusta, he fought Wheeler, Dec. 4. and drove him from his, barricades through Waynesboroa and across Brier Creek, full eight miles, wh
December 3rd (search for this): chapter 15
or their captors robbed them of most of their clothing, with all their money, watches, et cetera. the ground inclosed within the stockade was about three hundred feet square, and at times it was crowded with the suffering captives. Just inside of the palisades was a light rail fence, which marked the dead line, or a boundary beyond which no prisoner was allowed to pass, under penalty of death from the bullet of a guardsman. Sherman reached Millen, with the Seventeenth Corps, on the 3d of December. It had destroyed the railway from the Ogeechee to that town, where, so lately, thousands of Union prisoners had been confined. The sight of the horrid prison-pen, in which they had been crowded, and tortured with hunger, cold, and cruel treatment, in the midst of plenty, and in which seven hundred and fifty had died, made the blood of their living companions-in-arms course more quickly in their veins, because of indignation, and nerved them to the performance of every service required
December 4th (search for this): chapter 15
e dirt road leading to Savannah, while the divisions of Hazen and J. E. Smith were still further to the right. At Statesborough the former had a severe skirmish Dec. 4. with some Confederate cavalry, which he dispersed. Slocum marched from Louisville with the left wing, on the 1st of December, the Twentieth Corps in advance. by Baird's infantry division of that corps, pushed on toward Waynesboroa. At Thomas's Station, on the railway connecting Millen and Augusta, he fought Wheeler, Dec. 4. and drove him from his, barricades through Waynesboroa and across Brier Creek, full eight miles, while Baird was breaking up the iron road and destroying bridges, and he returned to his quarters satisfied that all was well in Tennessee. Hood pressed up in full strength to invest Nashville, and on the morning of the 4th of December had formed his line, with his salient on Montgomery Hill, not more than six hundred yards from Wood's, at Thomas's center. His main line occupied the high gr
December 10th (search for this): chapter 15
, but Kilpatrick and Baird gallantly covered the rear ,of the moving columns between the Ogeechee and Savannah rivers. While there was frequent skirmishing, and fallen trees and other obstructions were met everywhere, no enemy in force was seen anywhere, until the heads of columns were within fifteen miles of the city of Savannah. All the roads leading into that town were obstructed by felled trees, earth-works, and artillery. These were easily turned and the foe expelled, and by the 10th of December the Confederates were driven within their lines, These lines followed substantially a swampy creek, which emptied into the Savannah River three miles above the city, and across to the bend of a corresponding stream which emptied into the Little Ogeechee: River. These streams, bordered by swamps and rice-fields flooded at high water, formed excellent flanks for the Confederates. and Savannah was completely beleagured. Sherman forbore making an immediate attack, for the only approach
December 8th (search for this): chapter 15
ion of Cheatham's corps, General Milroy was sent out from Fort Rosecrans with a small force to its assistance. The little garrison held it firmly until Milroy came, when the assailants were quickly driven away. During the next three days, Bate was re-enforced by two divisions of infantry and about twenty-five hundred cavalry, and then menaced Fort Rosecrans, but did not actually assail it. Buford's cavalry, after its batteries had opened briskly upon Murfreesboroa, dashed into the town, Dec. 8. but they were quickly expelled by a regiment of infantry, when they swept around by way of Lebanon, to the Cumberland, with the intention of getting upon Thomas's communications with Louisville by rail. The gunboats patrolling the river foiled their designs. On the same day, Milroy went out again with a stronger force, and fought the Confederates on the Wilkeson pike, routing them, with a loss on his part of two hundred and five men killed and wounded, and capturing from his antagonist ov
ent back to Knoxville. The writer visited Nashville, and the battle-field in its vicinity, at the beginning of May, 1866, after a voyage on the Cumberland to Fort Donelson and back, See page 226, volume II. and he was placed under many obligations to General Thomas, and members of his staff, and especially to Major Willard, for kind attentions, and for facilities for obtaining all necessary topographical and historical information concerning the battle of the 15th and 16th of December, 1864. of which a description, in outline, is given in this chapter. General Thomas took the writer, in his light carriage drawn by a span of beautiful dappled gray horses, to various points of interest, the most important of which, for the author's purpose, was the lofty hill between the Hardin and Granny White turnpikes, on which the commanding general stood, with the whole field of operations in view, and directed the battle on the 15th. With a large topographical map in his hand, See red
ssippi, and captured and destroyed Hood's pontoon train, ten miles from Russellville. Another force being reported in pursuit, under cover of darkness Palmer pushed for Moulton. Meeting the Confederates near Thorn Hill, he attacked and defeated 1865. them, and arrived safely at Decatur on the 6th of January. On the 30th of December, General Thomas announced to the army the. termination of the campaign, Thomas estimated his entire loss during the campaign, in all the operations under his to Huntsville, and to concentrate the troops of Smith, Schofield and Wilson, at Eastport, to await a renewal of the winter campaign in Mississippi and Alabama. Hood's army, as an organization, had almost disappeared, when, on the 23d of January 1865. he was relieved, as he said, at his own request, at Tupelo, in Mississippi. It was during the active campaign in Middle Tennessee, just considered, that the stirring events in which Generals Gillem and Breckinridge were chief actors, occurred,
December 12th (search for this): chapter 15
e road. This position he assailed, when an obstinate fight ensued, which resulted in his defeat, and retreat at evening, with a loss of 746 men. Foster then sent General E. E. Potter, with two brigades, across the Coosawhatchie, to Devaux Neck, when he advanced and seized a position Dec. 6, 1864. within cannon range of the railway, which he fortified and firmly held until the remainder of Foster's column came up to his help. It was here that the commanding general first heard, on the 12th of December, of Sherman being before Savannah, when he hastened to meet him, as recorded in the text. By direction of Sherman, he held on to the position near the Charleston and Savannah railway, and after Hardee fled to Charleston he took possession of and occupied the Confederate works at Pocotaligo, and at the railway crossings of the Tullifinny and Coosawhatchie rivers. That doubt was soon removed. Hazen had signaled back to Sherman, I am ready and will assault at once. He did so. It was
December 18th (search for this): chapter 15
the 10th of January he attacked a little garrison at Scottsboroa, and was repulsed, but succeeded in crossing the Tennessee River with a remnant of his command, only about 200 in number. He was still pursued, and at a place known as Red Hill, he was surprised by Colonel Palmer, and half his men were made prisoners, on the 14th of January. After surrendering, he escaped, by seizing a pistol, shooting a sentinel, and disappearing in the gloom of night. In the mean time Thomas had sent Dec. 18. Steedman with his forces across from Franklin to Murfreesboroa, with directions to proceed around by railway to Decatur, in Alabama, and thus to threaten Hood's railroad communications west of Florence. He was instructed to send back the garrisons which General Granger had called to Stevenson, See page 419. to their former posts. He was joined by Granger at the latter place, and they reoccupied Decatur on the 27th, but too late to impede Hood's flight, for he had already crossed the T
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