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Philadelphia (Pennsylvania, United States) (search for this): chapter 20
Phillips's life by her companionship, and when he himself had to be escorted home by a body-guard. The orator's scarifying review of these proceedings, from Lib. 30.202, 203. Theodore Parker's pulpit, on Sunday, December 16,—his topic being Mobs and Education,—brought him a second (daylight) assault as he issued from the Music Hall, and made his return home a street fight. On the same day, in Brooklyn, Henry Ward Beecher had to be guarded by Lib. 30.203. police in Plymouth Church. In Philadelphia, George William Curtis, engaged to lecture on Honesty in a lyceum course, was suppressed by the joint apprehensions Lib. 30.209. of the Mayor and the owners of the hall. For all this, the movement went on. On December 17 the Secession Convention opened its sessions with prayer in Charleston, and with the Palmetto flag flying over all the city and harbor save at Fort Moultrie. On December 20, it passed an ordinance of secession based primarily Lib. 30.207, 209. on the violation of
Worcester (Massachusetts, United States) (search for this): chapter 20
President. A secession followed, and a rump convention nominated John C. June 28. Breckinridge of Kentucky as the regular Democratic candidate. The triumph of the Republican Party was now a foregone conclusion, and all eyes were turned in scrutiny upon Lincoln. To the country at large he was an obscure, not to say an unknown man. His visit to New England in the fall of 1848, when, during the Congressional recess, he took the stump for Zachary Taylor, had made no impression. At Worcester, Mass., on Sept. 13, 1848, he repeated Mr. Webster's remark, that the nomination of Van Buren by a professedly anti-slavery party was either a trick or a joke; and declared, on his own account, that, of the three parties then asking the confidence of the country, the new one had less of principle than any other, adding, amid shouts of laughter, that the recently constructed, elastic Free-Soil platform reminded him of nothing so much as the pair of trousers offered for sale by a Yankee pedlar,
Harper's Ferry (West Virginia, United States) (search for this): chapter 20
rrison hails the secession of South Carolina as the end of the old Union and of slavery. The lamentable tragedy at Harper's Ferry is clearly traceable to the unjustifiable attempt to force slavery into Kansas by a repeal of the Missouri Compromiseing of John Brown. It was the historic truth; and the work of Nemesis had but begun. Directly after the attack on Harper's Ferry, the South initiated disunion by fortifying itself against domestic insurrection, both by extra vigilance and armed p Lib. 30.171. or over the perennial fear of slave risings, such as infected Lib. 29.187, 191. the whole South after Harper's Ferry, and in the summer and autumn of 1860 raged afresh, so that, as President Lib. 30.137, 141, 146, 149, 163, 171, 177,The North bade them good-bye with a smile at their silliness, and turned an incredulous ear to the Southern echoes of Harper's Ferry in both Houses of Congress. Had not Fremont's possible election in 1856 been made the ground Ante, p. 435. of threa
Mexico (Mexico, Mexico) (search for this): chapter 20
. 30.17. The election of a Black Republican President would furnish the occasion. In the House, Singleton of Mississippi declared he would never suffer Lib. 30.17. the army and navy to pass into the hands of such an Executive (with control, too, as Governor Letcher of Lib. 30.17, 18. Virginia added, of the judiciary and the post-offices). His advice to his own State was: The sooner we get out of the Union, the better. . . . A gallant son of the South, Jefferson Davis, led our forces into Mexico, and, thank God! he still lives, perhaps to lead a Southern army. Lib. 30.9. Davis, in spite of his having repeatedly pledged Ante, p. 469; himself to disunion in case of Republican success, was the Lib. 30.17. favorite standard-bearer in 1860 with the more besotted Democrats of the North. And even as Singleton was nominating him commander-in-chief of a Confederate army, Davis was reading a letter from ex-President Pierce, Jan. 6, 1860. marking him as the coming man for the nationa
Dixon, Ill. (Illinois, United States) (search for this): chapter 20
right—of abstract power to secede, I have never believed that actual disruption of the Union can occur without blood. And if, through the madness of Northern abolitionism, that dire calamity must come, the fighting will not be along Mason's and Dixon's line merely: it [will] be within our own borders, in our own streets, between the two classes of citizens to whom I have referred. Those who defy law and scout constitutional obligations, will, if we ever reach the arbitrament of arms, find oct is outlawed in all the South, and can neither hold meetings nor nominate candidates in that part of the country, and while neither Mr. Seward, nor Mr. Sumner, nor any other of its prominent men, is permitted freedom of speech south of Mason and Dixon's line, it is still insanely engaged in glorifying the Union, and pledging itself to frown upon all attempts to dissolve it. Though no member of the Republican Party could escape this just condemnation, subserviency was in some merely a logic
Mason City (Illinois, United States) (search for this): chapter 20
party has never even menaced the existence of the Union in any contingency; and that, of all the political parties that have yet been organized in this country, none has ever surpassed the Republican Party in its slavish subserviency to the Union; for while it is outlawed in all the South, and can neither hold meetings nor nominate candidates in that part of the country, and while neither Mr. Seward, nor Mr. Sumner, nor any other of its prominent men, is permitted freedom of speech south of Mason and Dixon's line, it is still insanely engaged in glorifying the Union, and pledging itself to frown upon all attempts to dissolve it. Though no member of the Republican Party could escape this just condemnation, subserviency was in some merely a logical attitude. While Governor Banks vetoed Lib. 30.10, 30. a revised code of Massachusetts rather than tolerate the omission of the word white from its militia law, and revetoed the bill introduced and passed as a separate Lib. 30.43, [46]
Fort Moultrie (South Carolina, United States) (search for this): chapter 20
he same day, in Brooklyn, Henry Ward Beecher had to be guarded by Lib. 30.203. police in Plymouth Church. In Philadelphia, George William Curtis, engaged to lecture on Honesty in a lyceum course, was suppressed by the joint apprehensions Lib. 30.209. of the Mayor and the owners of the hall. For all this, the movement went on. On December 17 the Secession Convention opened its sessions with prayer in Charleston, and with the Palmetto flag flying over all the city and harbor save at Fort Moultrie. On December 20, it passed an ordinance of secession based primarily Lib. 30.207, 209. on the violation of Constitutional rights by the passage of Personal Liberty laws—i. e., on the statutory achievements of the Garrisonian abolitionists. In place of quoting the language of the ordinance regarding the nature of the compact alleged to have been nullified by the North, let us take that of John Quincy Adams, from the familiar armory of the abolitionists: Yes! it cannot be denied—t
Auburn, Va. (Virginia, United States) (search for this): chapter 20
if we ever reach the arbitrament of arms, find occupation enough at home. Independent Democrat, Concord, N. H., Sept. 17, 1863; Greeley's Am. Conflict, 1.513; Lib. 33.158. On the other hand, the acknowledged coming man of the Republican Party, William H. Seward, doubtless well content to have been absent in Europe during the John Brown excitement, landed in New York on Lib. 30.3. December 27, 1859, to the sound of guns in the City Hall park, and made a triumphal progress to his home in Auburn. Resuming his place in the Senate, where he was shunned Lib. 30.11. by his virtuous Southern colleagues, he made his first manifesto in a speech on his bill to admit Kansas. Instead Feb. 29, 1860; Lib. 30.31, 37. of proclaiming afresh, with all the force of the latest evidence, the irrepressible conflict, he argued that there was no need of collision. Instead of justifying his Rochester Ante, p. 469. speech with John Brown, he repudiated him and justified his punishment. Instead of p
Sinai (Virginia, United States) (search for this): chapter 20
he Address at N. Bridgewater, Mass., Nov. 6, 1844; Phillips's Constitution a Pro-Slavery Compact, 3d ed., p. 182; Lib. 30.150. South prescribed, as a condition of their assent to the Constitution, three special provisions to secure the perpetuity of their dominion over their slaves. The first was the immunity for twenty years of pursuing the African slave trade; the second was the stipulation to surrender fugitive slaves—an engagement positively prohibited by the laws of God delivered from Sinai; and thirdly, the exaction, fatal to the principles of popular representation, of a representation for slaves—for articles of merchandise, under the name of persons ... The delegates from South Carolina and Georgia distinctly avowed that, without this guarantee of protection to their property in slaves, they would not yield their assent to the Constitution; and the freemen of the North, reduced to the alternative of departing from the vital principles of their liberty, or of forfeiting th
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