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Browsing named entities in a specific section of Colonel Charles E. Hooker, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 12.2, Mississippi (ed. Clement Anselm Evans). Search the whole document.

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W. W. Loring —brigades of John Adams, Buford, and Featherston, aggregate present, 7,427. Division of Maj.-Gen. W. H. T. Walker—brigades of Ector, Gist, Gregg and Wilson, aggregate present, 9,571. Cavalry division, Brig.-Gen. W. H. Jackson—brigades of Cosby and Whitfield, aggregate present, 4,373. Camp of direction, 247; reserve artillery, 294. Grand aggregate present was reported at 36,315; effective total, 28,154. Breckinridge's division was ordered forward to Clinton from Jackson, June 30th, and on the evening of July 1st Johnston's army encamped between Brownsville and the Yazoo river. Col. Wirt Adams, reconnoitering near Edwards, reported that the Federal line was weakest south of the railroad, and that the Federal army was suffering greatly from disease, and quite discouraged by its heavy losses. Many citizens, he said, express the confident belief that the climate alone will cause them to raise the siege if our garrison could hold out three weeks. On July 3d Johnston<
dson, assisted by General Gholson, of the Mississippi militia, to tear up the road between La Grange and Corinth, while he made a demonstration between Memphis and La Grange. His force comprised Colonel Slemon's brigade, the Thirty-third cavalry, and George's Fifth cavalry; and Colonel McCulloch's brigade, the First Partisan Rangers, Eighteenth battalion and Second Missouri. Major Mitchell, with two companies of the Eighteenth, drove in the enemy's pickets at Quinn's mill on the night of the 1st, and Chalmers crossed there on the 3d, capturing the picket of 27 men. He then attacked the Federal force at Collierville, but found it heavily reinforced, so that the gallant charge made by his men was of no avail. Colonel George, leading the attack of Slemons' brigade and riding into town, was captured. The chief surgeon, Dr. W. H. Beatty, was also taken, and 24 others, and 69 were killed or wounded. Meanwhile a small force, under Col. J. J. Neely, destroyed the railroad near Middleton.
f using the cotton to secure needed supplies for the army. There now remains to be noted the services of Mississippi soldiers in the battles of 1863 of the army of Tennessee, and the career of those who served in the army of Northern Virginia. In the cavalry operations in Tennessee early in 1863, the First and Twenty-eighth Mississippi cavalry regiments and the Fourth, Col. James Gordon, took a prominent part in Van Dorn's defeat and capture of Coburn's brigade at Thompson's Station, March 5th. Later in the same month the Fourth cavalry shared in the brilliant capture of the Federal force at Brentwood, by Forrest's command. At the organization of Bragg's army preceding the battle of Chickamauga, the Fifth Mississippi, Lieut.-Col. W. L. Sykes, and the Eighth, Col. John C. Wilkinson, formed part of the brigade of John K. Jackson, Cheatham's division, Polk's corps. The artillery of this division, under command of Maj. Melancthon Smith, included Smith's battery, under Lieut. W.
July, 1863 AD (search for this): chapter 10
Chapter 10: Operations in Mississippi July to December, 1863 siege of Jackson minor operations in the State service of Mississippians outside the State battle of Chickamauga Knoxville Chancellorsville Missionary Ridge Ringgold Gettysburg. The return of the army which General Johnston had collected at Jackson for June 25th shows the following organization: Division of Maj.-Gen. John C. Breckinridge—brigades of D. W. Adams, Helm and Stovall, aggregate present, 6,884. Division of Maj.-Gen. S. G. French—brigades of N. G. Evans, McNair and Maxey, aggregate present, 7,466. Division of Maj.-Gen. W. W. Loring —brigades of John Adams, Buford, and Featherston, aggregate present, 7,427. Division of Maj.-Gen. W. H. T. Walker—brigades of Ector, Gist, Gregg and Wilson, aggregate present, 9,571. Cavalry division, Brig.-Gen. W. H. Jackson—brigades of Cosby and Whitfield, aggregate present, 4,373. Camp of direction, 247; reserve artillery, 294. Grand aggregate pres
July 1st, 1863 AD (search for this): chapter 10
and, after serving on the Richmond and Blackwater lines, was ordered to Goldsboro, North Carolina, in December. It served under Longstreet in the Suffolk campaign, and in May was transferred to Heth's division of A. P. Hill's corps, and went to the front in Northern Virginia early in June. The Second was now commanded by Col. John M. Stone; Eleventh by Col. F. M. Green; Forty-second by Col. H. R. Miller. The Fifty-fifth North Carolina made the fourth regiment of the brigade. On the 1st of July, 1863, after Pettigrew's brigade of the same division had discovered the enemy at Gettysburg, the Eleventh was detailed as guard for the wagon train, and the other regiments of the brigade joined in the bloody but successful attack upon Reynolds' corps. General Heth's report says, Davis, on the left, advanced driving the enemy before him and capturing his batteries, but was unable to hold the position he had gained. The enemy concentrated on his front and flanks an overwhelming force. The
inor operations in the State service of Mississippians outside the State battle of Chickamauga Knoxville Chancellorsville Missionary Ridge Ringgold Gettysburg. The return of the army which General Johnston had collected at Jackson for June 25th shows the following organization: Division of Maj.-Gen. John C. Breckinridge—brigades of D. W. Adams, Helm and Stovall, aggregate present, 6,884. Division of Maj.-Gen. S. G. French—brigades of N. G. Evans, McNair and Maxey, aggregate presenaway; burned corn-cribs, mills, etc., and in many instances robbed citizens of clothing and furniture. On June 21st Lieut.-Col. R. C. Wood defeated a body of the enemy at Jones' plantation, capturing his cannon and thirty-three prisoners. On June 25th forty Federal raiders at Brookhaven, burning railroad cars, were pursued eighty-six miles by a force of thirty-five old men and boys, and captured. These little affairs, and many more that might be collected, illustrated the fact that while th
December, 1863 AD (search for this): chapter 10
Chapter 10: Operations in Mississippi July to December, 1863 siege of Jackson minor operations in the State service of Mississippians outside the State battle of Chickamauga Knoxville Chancellorsville Missionary Ridge Ringgold Gettysburg. The return of the army which General Johnston had collected at Jackson for June 25th shows the following organization: Division of Maj.-Gen. John C. Breckinridge—brigades of D. W. Adams, Helm and Stovall, aggregate present, 6,884. Division of Maj.-Gen. S. G. French—brigades of N. G. Evans, McNair and Maxey, aggregate present, 7,466. Division of Maj.-Gen. W. W. Loring —brigades of John Adams, Buford, and Featherston, aggregate present, 7,427. Division of Maj.-Gen. W. H. T. Walker—brigades of Ector, Gist, Gregg and Wilson, aggregate present, 9,571. Cavalry division, Brig.-Gen. W. H. Jackson—brigades of Cosby and Whitfield, aggregate present, 4,373. Camp of direction, 247; reserve artillery, 294. Grand aggregate pres
orinth. General Chalmers was also active in the northeast, embarrassing the enemy's transportation on the river. Col. Wirt Adams engaged Federal gunboats with his artillery at Liverpool Landing, May 20th-23d. Col. R. McCulloch's cavalry fought with an expedition from La Grange in the Senatobia swamp, May 23d. Colonel Slemons, about the same time, after firing on Federal transports near Austin, had a severe encounter with the cavalry under Ellet, who burned the town of Austin. On June 13th-22d there was an expedition under Colonel Phillips from La Grange, which was defeated severely by Colonel Barteau and Capt. R. G. Earle in a fight near Rocky Ford, on the Tallahatchie. The most formidable incursion was under Colonel Mizner and Major Henry from Tennessee. Chalmers, who had been bombarding the Federal steamers as they passed Dale's Point, promptly attacked Henry's command near Hernando on the 18th, and routed it, capturing Henry and 87 others and killing and wounding a large nu
87 others and killing and wounding a large number. Though compelled to fall back then, south of Panola, the Federal retreat was followed promptly, and Colonel McQuirk punished the enemy severely at Hudsonville. Colonel George reported of this expedition that its members stole every horse, mule, buggy, carriage and wagon they could seize, and every slave they could entice or force away; burned corn-cribs, mills, etc., and in many instances robbed citizens of clothing and furniture. On June 21st Lieut.-Col. R. C. Wood defeated a body of the enemy at Jones' plantation, capturing his cannon and thirty-three prisoners. On June 25th forty Federal raiders at Brookhaven, burning railroad cars, were pursued eighty-six miles by a force of thirty-five old men and boys, and captured. These little affairs, and many more that might be collected, illustrated the fact that while the United States forces had possession of the borders of the States on three sides, yet the interior was not for th
October 26th (search for this): chapter 10
tion of General Wheeler, which was desired, was delayed on account of the exhaustion of his command consequent upon the famous McMinnville raid. On October 14th, General McPherson, commanding at Vicksburg, started on an expedition toward Canton with 6,500 infantry and Winslow's cavalry brigade. His advance was gallantly checked by Cosby's brigade under Col. Wirt Adams, and Logan's brigade, on Bogue Chitto creek, and the expedition turned back considerably short of its destination. On October 26th, Gen. Samuel F. Ferguson, with a small command, attacked and routed the First Alabama (U. S.) cavalry, near Bay Springs. Gen. Leonidas L. Polk was assigned to the command of the army of the Mississippi, October 23d, General Johnston retaining his position at the head of the department. Early in November, when Grant, now in supreme command of the United States forces between the Mississippi and the Alleghanies, was making a desperate effort to hurry Sherman to the relief of Chattanooga
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