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June 29th, 1863 AD (search for this): chapter 22
Doc. 20.-the battles of Gettysburgh. Cincinnati Gazette account. special correspondence of Mr. Whitelaw Reid to the Cincinnati Gazette, from the army of the Potomac. After the invaders. I. Getting a good ready.Washington, June 29, 1863. would like you (if you feel able) to equip yourself with horse and outfit, put substitutes in your place in the office, and join Hooker's army in time for the fighting. It was a despatch, Sunday evening, from the manager, kindly alluding to a temporary debility that grew out of too much leisure on a recent visit west. Of course I felt able, or knew I should by to-morrow. But, alas! it was Hooker's army no longer. Washington was all a-buzz with the removal. A few idol-worshippers hissed their exultation at the constructive disgrace; but for the most part, there was astonishment at the unprecedented act and indignation at the one cause to which all attributed it. Any reader who chanced to remember a few paragraphs in a rec
n lying still all winter, under good shelter; has been tolerably well fed and clothed, and in this way has had a chance to recuperate after the fatiguing campaigns of last summer. Second, most of the weakly men, who could not stand a day's march without being sent to the rear, have been either discharged or have died, thus leaving a smaller portion of those remaining liable to disease. Third, since that portion of the rebel army (Ewell's corps) moved from behind Fredericksburgh, on the fourth of June last, it has been favored with remarkably fine weather; has been stimulated with almost uninterrupted success in its movements; has been marching through a rich and fertile country, and, by levying on the inhabitants of which, the soldiers have been able to procure an abundance of good wholesome food, better, perhaps, than they had for many months. These, and not the want of tents, are probably the causes which give to the rebel army its present healthy tone. Under ordinary circumstanc
er parts of the country. In this way it was supposed that the enemy's plan of campaign for the summer would be broken up, and part of the season of active operations be consumed in the formations of new combinations, and the preparations that they would require. In addition to these advantages, it was hoped that other valuable results might be attained by military success. Actuated by these and other important considerations that may hereafter be presented, the movement began on the third June. McLaws's division, of Longstreet's corps, left Fredericksburgh for Culpeper Court-House, and Hood's division, which was encamped on the Rapidan, marched to the same place. They were followed on the fourth and fifth by Ewell's corps, leaving that of A. P. Hill to occupy our lines at Fredericksburgh. The march of these troops having been discovered by the enemy on the afternoon of the fifth, and the following day he crossed a force, amounting to about one army corps, to the south sid
tories of western troops, are effectually shattered. It has shown to the public — it has always been evident to military judges — that this army has the capacity for fight, the endurance, the elan, and the energy to render it invincible in the hands of a cool and skilful General. The first movement toward the invasion of Pennsylvania was opened soon after the battle of Chancellorsville by a cavalry movement, which was met and quashed at Brandy Station by General Pleasanton, about the first of June. On the thirteenth ultimo, General Milroy was attacked at Winchester by the advance of Lee's army under General Ewell, and fled disgracefully, after a short conflict, to Harper's Ferry, abandoning all his stores and cannon to the rebels. This opened the way for the advance of the foe across the Potomac. Another force of its cavalry crossed the upper Potomac on the fifteenth, causing great consternation in Maryland and Lower Pennsylvania. It entered Chambersburgh and Mercersburgh in t
October 1st, 1863 AD (search for this): chapter 22
hey are my only trophy from that glorious field. Good-by to Gettysburgh — a mad gallop to Westminster, (which brought our day's ride up to nearly fifty miles,) to catch a train that after all, loaded with wounded soldiers as it was, spent the whole night backing and hauling on side tracks and switches; and so at last to Baltimore; and out of the field once more. May it be forever. Agate. Gazette office, July 8. Major-General Meade's report. headquarters army of the Potomac, October 1, 1863. General: I have the honor to submit herewith a report of the operations of this army during the month of July, including details of the battle of Gettysburgh, which have been delayed by failure to receive the reports of the several corps and division commanders, who were severely wounded in battle. On the twenty-eighth of June I received orders from the President, placing me in command of the army of the Potomac. The situation of affairs was briefly as follows: The confederate
se permitted us to accumulate stores at that point. When the march was again resumed, our wagons with a replenished stock continued to follow in the rear of the column. Dr. Alex. McDonald, who was temporarily in charge of our station at Acquia, as soon as he had reported the removal of our stores from that point, rejoined the corps in the field. I quote from his report a resume of our operations with the army, until it crossed the Potomac at Edwards's Ferry. On Monday, the twenty-second instant, (June,) two wagons loaded with hospital stores, in care of Messrs. Bush and Scandlin, and accompanied by Mr. Bellows, were sent to Fairfax Court-House; on Tuesday, another load, accompanied by Messrs. Hoag, Paige, Holbrook, and myself, proceeded to the same point, arriving at four P. M., and on Wednesday, a mule train with forage was sent in charge of Mr. Clampitt. Our intention was to leave one wagon with relief agent and storekeeper at Fairfax, to send a similar force to Centre
to Williamsport and Falling Waters, where they destroyed the enemy's ponton-bridge and captured its guard. Buford was at the same time sent to Williamsport and Hagerstown. The duty above assigned to the cavalry was most successfully accomplished, the enemy being greatly harassed, his trains destroyed, and many captures in guns and prisoners made. After halting a day at Middletown to procure necessary supplies and to bring up trains, the army moved through South-Mountain, and by the twelfth of July. was in front of the enemy, who occupied a strong position on the heights of Marsh Run, in advance of Williamsport. In taking this position, several skirmishes and affairs had been had with the enemy, principally by cavalry, from the Eleventh and Sixth corps. The thirteenth was occupied in making reconnoissances of the enemy's position and preparations for attack, but on advancing on the morning of the fourteenth, it was ascertained he had retired the night previous by a bridge a
ses and columbine, and modest, sweet-scented pinks, mingled with sprigs of cypress — they are my only trophy from that glorious field. Good-by to Gettysburgh — a mad gallop to Westminster, (which brought our day's ride up to nearly fifty miles,) to catch a train that after all, loaded with wounded soldiers as it was, spent the whole night backing and hauling on side tracks and switches; and so at last to Baltimore; and out of the field once more. May it be forever. Agate. Gazette office, July 8. Major-General Meade's report. headquarters army of the Potomac, October 1, 1863. General: I have the honor to submit herewith a report of the operations of this army during the month of July, including details of the battle of Gettysburgh, which have been delayed by failure to receive the reports of the several corps and division commanders, who were severely wounded in battle. On the twenty-eighth of June I received orders from the President, placing me in command of the arm
force had been augmented while at Culpeper by General Pickett, with three brigades of his division. The cavalry, under General Stuart, was thrown out in front of Longstreet to watch the enemy, now reported to be moving into Loudon. On the seventeenth his cavalry encountered two brigades of ours, under General Stuart, near Aldie, and was driven back with loss. The next day the engagement was renewed, the Federal cavalry being strongly supported by infantry, and General Stuart was in turn cfor one hundred thousand militia for this purpose. The first troops under this call left New-York on the seventeenth June. In anticipation of the accumulation of a large body of troops in the neighborhood of Harrisburgh, I despatched, on the seventeenth, Dr. Wm. F. Swalm, Inspector of the Sanitary Commission, with Mr. Isaac Harris, relief agent, to that point. They arrived at Harrishurgh before any troops, and made diligent preparation to lend such assistance as might be required. They rema
July 31st, 1863 AD (search for this): chapter 22
W. F. Smith, who joined me at Boonsboro, just prior to the withdrawal of the confederate army. In conclusion, I desire to return my thanks to my staff, general and personal, to each and all of whom I was indebted for unremitting activity and most efficient assistance. Very respectfully, your obedient servant, Geo. G. Meade, Major-General Commanding. Brigadier-General L. Thomas, Adjutant-General U. S. A. General R. E. Lee's report. headquarters army of Northern Virginia, July 31, 1863. General S. Cooper, Adjutant and Inspector-General, Richmond, Va.: General: I have the honor to submit the following outline of the recent operations of this army for the information of the department: The position occupied by the enemy opposite Fredericksburgh being one in which he could not be attacked to advantage, it was determined to draw him from it. The execution of this purpose embraced the relief of the Shenandoah Valley from the troops that had occupied the lower part of
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