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est letters sufficiently magnified. Bacon was born at Ilchester, in Somersetshire, in 1214, the year before the signing of Magna Charta; was educated at Oxford, then studied in Paris, where he took his degree, which was subsequently confirmed by the Oxford University; in 1240 he took the vows of a Franciscan at Oxford. His talents and originality caused him to be suspected by his brethren, and he was imprisoned in 1268, and closely confined for ten years. He returned to Oxford, and died in 1292. The claim to the invention of spectacles, asserted in behalf of Alexander de Spina, a monk of Pisa, who died in 1313, is believed to be anticipated by this dateof Bacon's. Scribe with Spec-tacles (tapestry of Nancy, France). Fig. 5356 is from the tapestry of Nancy, of the latter part of the fifteenth century, and represents a scribe with spectacles on nose, and with all his apparatus of writing,—pen, penknife portable case, book, and paper. Chaucer and Lydgate refer to spectacles.
d, a bill was brought forward and passed which made the avoidable production of smoke from furnace-chimneys an indictable and finable offense. Complaints against the smoke nuisance are of very old date. Great prejudice was felt in former times in England against the burning of coal, known then as sea-coal, because it was brought from the Tyne to the Thames by sea. It was supposed to be injurious to trade, health, the complexion, and a whole catalogue of evils was feared from its use. In 1306, the king of England issued a proclamation against its use, and a commission was issued for the purpose of ascertaining who burned seacoal within the city and its neighborhood, and to punish them by fine for the first offense and by the demolition of their furnaces if they persisted; but even these severe proceedings failed to put down the nuisance. A law was therefore passed, making the burning of sea-coal within the city a capital offense, and permitting its use only in the forges in the n
May 4th, 1858 AD (search for this): chapter 19
26, 1875. 1. (b.) Shuttles vibrate. No.Name.Date. 7,776WilsonNov. 12, 1850. 9,139MillerJuly 20, 1852. 11,934HarrisNov. 14, 1854. 11,971ParhamNov. 21, 1854. 13,195WoodruffJuly 3, 1855. 13,242WoodruffJuly 10, 1855. (Reissue.)345WilsonJan. 22, 1856. 15,635JohnsonAug. 26, 1856. (Reissue.)414WilsonDec. 9, 1856. 16,234GibbsDec. 16, 1856. 16,281LandfearDec. 23, 1856. 16,321WoodruffDec. 23, 1856. 18,068WickershamAug. 25, 1857. 18,069WickershamAug. 25, 1857. 20,175SmithMay 4, 1858. 20,531SangsterJune 8, 1858. 21,461WoodruffSept. 7, 1858. 22,137Spencer et al.Nov. 23, 1858. 22,255MackenzieDec. 7, 1858. 23,157CooperMar. 8, 1859. 26,130SingerNov. 15, 1859. 26,366MitchellDec. 6, 1859. 26,586HarrisonDec. 27, 1859. 27,208DavisFeb. 21, 1860. 28,610Scofield et al.June 5, 1860. 31,625RichardsMar. 5, 1861. 32,239ComfortMay 7, 1861. 33,415BollmanOct. 1, 1861. 33,940GroverDec. 17, 1861. 37,617DulaneyFeb. 10, 1863. 37,624HollowellFeb. 10, 1863. 38,592MackMay 19,
March 26th, 1872 AD (search for this): chapter 19
isNov. 14, 1871. 121,014SmithNov. 15, 1871. 121,356GoldsmithNov. 28, 1871. 121,516HarrisDec. 5, 1871. 124,206Goodrich et al.Mar. 5, 1872. 124,968MoschowitzMar. 26, 1872. 125,590MartinApr. 9, 1872. 125,674GrosfeldApr. 16, 1872. 127,158DaltonMay 28, 1872. 128,216DulaneyJune 25, 1872. 130,021ComingsJuly 30, 1872. 130,914GroLyonJan. 30, 1872. 123,494MackFeb. 6, 1872. 123,788MoscheowitzFeb. 20, 1872. 123,910JohnstonFeb. 20, 1872. 123,995JohnstonFeb. 27, 1872. 124,894Gray et al.Mar. 26, 1872. 125,230ToofApr. 2, 1872. 125,231ToofApr. 2, 1872. 125,424Willcox et al.Apr. 9, 1872. 126,139EllisApr. 30, 1872. 126,436Barney et al.May 7, 1872. 126,913Au 29, 1848.85,917.Downing, Jan. 19, 1869. 39,876.Bolton, Sept. 15, 1863.124,867.White et al. March 19, 1872. 47,208.Johnston, Apr. 11, 1865.125,055.Knizel, March 26, 1872. 62,669.Nelson, March 5, 1867. Fig. 5943 is for straightening shafts or bending iron of round or other section. The shaft is supported on two rests, and
n K, and at the same time draws up the bit toward the ring on the cheek-strap. See bridle. Safe′ty-buoy. A float to be attached to the person to prevent drowning. Safe′ty-cage. A hoisting and lowering chamber for mines, having guards which arrest the descent if the rope break or overwind. See cage; rope-Ele-Vator; safety-stop, etc. Safe′ty-car. 1. A marine car adapted to be drawn ashore on a hawser connecting a stranded vessel with the land. See life-car, Fig. 2927, page 1302. 2. A hoisting cage with stops to arrest its fall if the rope break. See cage; safety-stop. Safe′ty-chain. (Railway.) A slack chain which attaches a truck to a car-body and limits the excursions of the former as it slues round. Safe′ty-fun′nel. A glass funnel with a long neck for introducing acids, etc., into liquids contained in bottles or retorts, and under a pressure of gas. Safe′ty-fuse. A water-proof tube, ribbon, or tape containing an inflammable compos
ers were founded on piles, the spaces between which were filled in with stone, necessitating, after a time, the driving of other piles outside these, until the substructure frequently, as in the case of Old London Bridge, seriously obstructed the water-way and impeded navigation. This was built by Peter of Colechurch, 1176-1200, with houses on each side, connected by arches of timber, which crossed the roadway. This was burned in July, 1212, and 3,000 persons perished. It was restored in 1300; again partially burned in 1471, 1632, and 1725. The houses were pulled down in 1756, and finally the bridge itself, to make way for New London Bridge, constructed by the Rennies, opened in 1831. On this occasion the original piles, mostly of elm, were found to be but partially decayed, some portions being even used for making articles of utility or curiosity. The new bridge cost £ 506,000. The daily travel in 1859 was about 20,498 vehicles, carrying 60,836 persons, and 107,074 foot-passen
July 30th, 1861 AD (search for this): chapter 19
MillerJune 29, 1858. 20,990CarpenterJuly 27, 1858. 21,049HookJuly 27, 1858. 21,256Fitz et al.Aug. 24, 1858. 21,322ClarkAug. 31, 1858. 21,466ClintonSept. 7, 1858. 21,672HarrisOct. 5, 1858. 21,713WhiteOct. 5, 1858. 21,722HendrickOct. 5, 1858. 22,148PerryNov. 23, 1858. 22,719Fosket et al.Jan. 25, 1859. 24,098CarhartMay 24, 1859. 24,395McCurdyJune 14, 1859. 26,201PearsonNov. 22, 1859. 32,415CooperMay 28, 1861. 32,456StoakesMay 28, 1861. 32,782NortonJuly 9, 1861. 32,785RaymondJuly 30, 1861. 33,085HodgkinsAug. 20, 1861. 34,932WilliamsApr. 8, 1862. 38,450PalmerMay 5, 1863. 45,236FolsomNov. 29, 1864. 46,064BartlettJan. 31, 1865. (Reissue.)2,210BartlettMar. 27, 1866. 54,816GoodspeedMay 15, 1866. 56,990PiperAug. 7, 1866. 60,669BartramJan. 1, 1867. 61,176DriggsJan. 15, 1867. (Reissue.)2,745HodgkinsAug. 20, 1867. (Reissue.)2,746HodgkinsAug. 20, 1867. 68,196HillsAug. 27, 1867. 69,666HodgkinsOct. 8, 1867. 76,385BartlettApr. 7, 1868. 80,889WillmarthAug. 1
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